Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Date: Wednesday, 02/Feb/2022
10:30am - 11:00amOpening of the Help Desk
Location: Help Desk Room

If you have a question, please click on Breakout room in the Zoom menu at the bottom of the screen and choose "Help Desk Room."

11:00am - 11:15amWelcome & Opening
Location: Plenary Hall

Opening by the director of SFUVET and congress organizers

11:15am - 12:15pmKeynote 1: Prof Dr Stefan C. Wolter
Location: Plenary Hall
Session Chair: Juerg SCHWERI

Tradition alone will probably not get us further

Looking back at two decades of research on the economics of VET/PET, we have gained some insights into the functioning of the VET market, the behavior of firms, learners, and the state. Some of these insights will also help us to ensure the functioning of the VET/PET system in the coming years, when technical and economic structural change (keyword digitalization) and socio-political changes will continue to challenge the system. However, the keynote talk will not only take stock of these findings but will also take the opportunity to address those questions to which we have either not yet found a satisfactory answer or those that will only arise in the future, and we are not sure whether the "old" instruments will also help us to solve new problems. These include, for example, the questions of how to reduce cultural resistance to vocational education and training, why certain systems are extremely susceptible to economic cycles and shocks and others are not, how to maintain the willingness of companies to train when real activities shift to the areas of competence of tertiary education, or how the interaction of general education and vocational education and training is to be designed so that the latter does not run the risk of falling into a negative spiral. One thing is certain: relying on the fact that the Swiss system has always mastered previous crises because it is built on a long tradition will not provide sufficient guarantee that it will also master all future crises. However, this opens up new perspectives for a forward-looking research agenda, which dynamic VET research would have to tackle already today.

12:15pm - 1:30pmLunch

                                                                    At 12:45pm in Hyhyve:

                                                                    - Meet health care researchers in room 2 at the smoothy bar
                                                                    - Meet SFUVET’s international affairs unit at the lake

                                                                    Hyhyve VET Congress platform

                                                                    For more information on Hyhyve, please visit the VET Congress website.

1:30pm - 3:00pmPaper Session 1A: Educational and occupational choice
Location: Room 1
Session Chair: Juerg SCHWERI
1:30pm - 3:00pmPaper Session 1B: Teaching and learning
Location: Room 2
Session Chair: Tanja KÄSER
1:30pm - 3:00pmSymposium 1: Policy transfer I
Location: Room 3
Session Chair: Antje BARABASCH
Session Chair: Sandra BOHLINGER

Discussant: Stefan WOLF

This symposium addresses international policy transfer which is a key theme in international and comparative education. Policy transfer in VET mainly stems from the attractiveness of particular governance models and practices in teaching and learning in VET. An example are Public-Private-Partnership models in VET such as the ‘dual’ apprenticeship scheme in German-speaking countries or outcomes-based education derived from Anglophone countries and both models are seen as ideal ways to integrate (young) people into the labour market. Advocates of the dual apprenticeship scheme emphasize the low youth unemployment rates in those countries that have an apprenticeship scheme while those in favour of the learning outcomes orientation emphasize its transferability to all educational fields and to different target groups and contexts (such as VET or HE).

Against this background, this symposium will be concerned with debates and theoretical perspectives on the issue of international policy transfer in VET and therewith related issues such as a comparison of policy transfer in VET versus HE or policy transfer in VET in relation to continuing and adult education. It specifically addresses processes of policy transfer between donor and receiving countries and regions, changing roles in terms of borrowing or lending policies and the role of (international) actors in policy transfer. Theoretical and empirical perspectives on describing and analysing the policy cycle of the transfer initiatives will be presented, identifying the epistemological positions and methodological approaches to selected initiatives with respect to educational policies, but also labour market or HR policies. Authors will critically review the importance of developing ownership and the risk of failure of policy transfer activities globally.

Contributions address policy transfer coming from or within typical VET countries, such as Germany and Switzerland, but also the Francophone area and international perspectives including China and Vietnam.

3:00pm - 3:30pmCoffee-Break
3:30pm - 5:00pmPaper Session 2A: Higher vocational education
Location: Room 1
Session Chair: Carmen BAUMELER
3:30pm - 5:00pmPaper Session 2B: Training conditions and success
Location: Room 2
Session Chair: Christian IMDORF
3:30pm - 5:00pmSymposium 2: Policy transfer II
Location: Room 3
Session Chair: Antje BARABASCH
Session Chair: Sandra BOHLINGER

Discussant: Stefan WOLF

This symposium addresses international policy transfer which is a key theme in international and comparative education. Policy transfer in VET mainly stems from the attractiveness of particular governance models and practices in teaching and learning in VET. An example are Public-Private-Partnership models in VET such as the ‘dual’ apprenticeship scheme in German-speaking countries or outcomes-based education derived from Anglophone countries and both models are seen as ideal ways to integrate (young) people into the labour market. Advocates of the dual apprenticeship scheme emphasize the low youth unemployment rates in those countries that have an apprenticeship scheme while those in favour of the learning outcomes orientation emphasize its transferability to all educational fields and to different target groups and contexts (such as VET or HE).

Against this background, this symposium will be concerned with debates and theoretical perspectives on the issue of international policy transfer in VET and therewith related issues such as a comparison of policy transfer in VET versus HE or policy transfer in VET in relation to continuing and adult education. It specifically addresses processes of policy transfer between donor and receiving countries and regions, changing roles in terms of borrowing or lending policies and the role of (international) actors in policy transfer. Theoretical and empirical perspectives on describing and analysing the policy cycle of the transfer initiatives will be presented, identifying the epistemological positions and methodological approaches to selected initiatives with respect to educational policies, but also labour market or HR policies. Authors will critically review the importance of developing ownership and the risk of failure of policy transfer activities globally.

Contributions address policy transfer coming from or within typical VET countries, such as Germany and Switzerland, but also the Francophone area and international perspectives including China and Vietnam.

5:15pm - 6:15pmVirtual Aperitif

Social gathering in Hyhyve

- Meet policy transfer researchers at the lake

Hyhyve VET Congress platform

For more information on Hyhyve, please visit the VET Congress website.

Date: Thursday, 03/Feb/2022
8:45am - 9:00amOpening of the Help Desk
Location: Help Desk Room

If you have a question, please click on Breakout room in the Zoom menu at the bottom of the screen and choose "Help Desk Room."

9:00am - 10:00amKeynote 2: Prof Dr Lorna Unwin
Location: Plenary Hall
Session Chair: Christian IMDORF

Re(valuing) VET as a route to expertise in disruptive times

In today’s highly varied world of work, where ‘intangible assets’ (ideas, brands, marketing, networks) and the use of digital technologies play an increasingly central and disruptive role, traditional boundaries between occupational fields and hierarchies are being breached. At the same time, faced with the pressures of daily life, many individuals are finding comfort and satisfaction in (re)learning and practising a craft as well as in buying handmade goods (for which, of course, there is a growing market). As such, VET navigates the shifting sands of change and continuity, of heritage and innovation, and of quality and the marketplace.

Yet, the bounded classifications that still determine to some extent the structure of VET systems, programmes and even pedagogies are rooted in a previous era when occupational categories were presumed to accurately describe the work people do, that young people were novices with nothing to teach their older colleagues, and that expertise was sliced up into clearly demarcated levels beyond which lay the rarified land of the ‘professions’. In this presentation, I will draw on ideas from Communication Studies and Cultural Sociology as well as from social theories of learning to explore how VET might grapple with a more fluid concept of expertise, one that acknowledges the different dynamic ways in which conceptions of its value are formulated beyond the confines of VET systems. I will argue that this could help VET address some of the challenges it faces through expanding the range of capabilities of its students and trainees and, as a result, addressing the demands from employers and politicians.

10:00am - 10:30amCoffee-Break
10:30am - 12:00pmPaper Session 3A: Training conditions and learning processes
Location: Room 1
Session Chair: Filippo PUSTERLA
10:30am - 12:00pmPaper Session 3B: Educational structures, transitions to higher education and into the labour market
Location: Room 2
Session Chair: Brigitte SCHELS
10:30am - 12:00pmPaper Session 3C: International VET cooperation
Location: Room 3
Session Chair: Lorenzo BONOLI
12:00pm - 1:00pmLunch

                                                                    At 12:30pm in Hyhyve:

                                                                    - Causes and secrets of the success of Swiss initial VET (at the lake)

                                                                    Hyhyve VET Congress platform

                                                                    For more information on Hyhyve, please visit the VET Congress website.

1:00pm - 2:30pmPaper Session 4A: Demand for education and skills
Location: Room 1
Session Chair: Juerg SCHWERI
1:00pm - 2:30pmPaper Session 4B: Organization and development of VET
Location: Room 2
Session Chair: Mona GRANATO
1:00pm - 2:30pmPaper Session 4C: Digital Learning
Location: Room 3
Session Chair: Alberto A. CATTANEO
1:00pm - 2:30pmPoster Session 4D
Location: Room 4
Session Chair: Sonja ENGELAGE
2:30pm - 3:00pmCoffee-Break
3:00pm - 4:00pmKeynote 3: Prof Dr Raija Hämäläinen
Location: Plenary Hall
Session Chair: Dominik PETKO

Digitalisation in a Rapidly Changing World: Multidisciplinary Methods and Technologies for Strengthening VET

The driving force for research in technology-enhanced learning is a rapidly changing world in which structural change is influencing the entire society and reshaping learning and professional development. The twenty-first century calls for novel, flexible skills and abilities in shared learning and working practices. Therefore, education and lifelong learning must aim not only to nurture the development of specific knowledge and professional competencies but also to support and teach productive learning processes. The preconditions for designing future VET efforts are the analysis and understanding of learning and interaction processes and their contextual adaptations. Specifically, in addition to understanding the effects of technology on learning and professional development, we need to understand how learning and interaction processes occur and unfold over time. Furthermore, the crucial question is how to operationalise our research-based knowledge to provide support for VET and professional development. In this talk, I will discuss the relationship between adults’ skills and their educational needs in these realms, based on large-scale assessment studies. From this perspective, and with empirical examples, I will further elaborate our research progress in learning and professional development, with examples from intervention studies aiming to target technology-enhanced learning as multilayered and situated phenomena and to provide tools for both researching and supporting learning and professional development. For example, I will consider how research can capture interaction processes (with novel methods; eye-tracking, heartrate variability and prosodic analysis of voice) and take the time variable into account to provide valuable insights into how to design, test and refine technologies and approaches for designing and supporting learning and professional development. Finally, the presentation will conclude with the theoretical and practical implications of methods and technologies for enhancing future VET.

4:15pm - 5:45pmPaper Session 5A: The role of different types of skills in the recruitment process
Location: Room 1
Session Chair: Miriam GRØNNING
4:15pm - 5:45pmPaper Session 5B: Teacher skills
Location: Room 2
Session Chair: Marina FIORI
4:15pm - 5:45pmSymposium 3: Current transformation of the health care sector and related training needs
Location: Room 3
Session Chair: Patrizia SALZMANN

Discussant: Miriam PETERS

The need for highly and specifically qualified personnel is a key concern in healthcare world-wide. Healthcare professionals are continuously confronted with changing competence re-quirements due to the increasing complexity of the tasks required, as well as the trends linked to organizational transformations and increasing digitalization of the world of work. Vocational and professional education and training (VPET) need to respond to these challenges to meet the demand for qualified staff. This symposium examines potential ways to enrich and adapt VPET in healthcare from various perspectives. The first contribution takes an articulation of an ethnographic work-analytic approach and uses analysis of neonatal nurses’ activity to identify competence requirements in neonatal care in France and derives possible improvements for training from the key concerns that structure the nurses’ activity. The second contribution also adopts an ethnographic approach to explore the impact of digital technology on nursing activities in Swiss hospitals, particularly on the transmission of patient care information; from this research, video-based learning situations will be created to train nursing staff. The third contribution analyzes the requirements for and needs of nurses in long-term care in the Swiss canton of Ticino, with the aim of developing a continuing education program that strengthens the resilience of active nurses and reintegrates nurses who have left the healthcare sector but wish to return under sustainable conditions. The fourth contribution examines the factors that contribute to companies training more tertiary-qualified nurses and supporting graduates of vocational education as healthcare assistants to pursue tertiary-level training in nursing; recommendations for subsequent action are made.

4:15pm - 5:45pmSymposium 4: The future of vocational training in the 1950s and 1970s
Location: Room 4
Session Chair: Lorenzo BONOLI
Session Chair: Philipp GONON

Discussant: Philipp GONON

In the years after the Second World War, several European countries reformed their vocational training systems by adopting measures and making choices that have marked the field to this day. Our symposium raises the question of the "future of vocational training" in this period in three European countries. In other words, what were the representations of the future of society and VET in the years 1950-1970 in Switzerland, Germany and France and to what extent did these representations shape the development of VET in the three countries considered here?

The 1950s and 1970s were years marked by an economic boom, a significant development of automation, a gradual expansion of the service sector, an acceleration in the pace of technical innovation, and major changes in social relations both in schools, with the democratisation of education, and in society, with the ‘68 . These events will have a profound influence on the future of society in general and vocational training in particular, which will be called upon to improve its quality, to review the content of its teaching, to integrate a greater number of young people and to ensure better conditions of equal opportunities.

Our symposium will allow us to examine how these events have influenced the debate in France, Germany and Switzerland and what concrete traces they have left to this day.

 

6:00pm - 7:00pmVirtual Aperitif

Social gathering in Hyhyve

Hyhyve VET Congress 2022

For more information on Hyhyve, please visit the VET Congress website.

Date: Friday, 04/Feb/2022
8:45am - 9:00amOpening of the Help Desk
Location: Help Desk Room

If you have a question, please click on Breakout room in the Zoom menu at the bottom of the screen and choose "Help Desk Room."

9:00am - 10:00amKeynote 4: Prof Dr Lukas Graf
Location: Plenary Hall
Session Chair: Peter SCHLÖGL

Vocational Education and Training in the Knowledge Economy: Comparing Pathways of Change in Switzerland and Germany

Vocational education and training (VET) systems are challenged by the rise of the knowledge and service economy, related changes in production models and workplaces, and, more generally, the growing popularity of academic forms of education. Moreover, European educational policies call for a greater permeability between VET and higher education. This is especially challenging for countries in which VET and higher education traditionally display a relatively strong institutional separation. However, achieving structural reforms in VET systems is demanding. This applies in particular to collectively governed dual-apprenticeship training that has its base in the industrial and crafts sectors of the economy and builds on a long-standing tradition of decentralised cooperation of multiple public and private stakeholders. As a result, it tends to be path-dependent, which favours gradual over radical forms of change. In view of the rise of the knowledge and service economy and the growing popularity of academic forms of education, this keynote analyses policy responses in Switzerland and Germany. How do these systems react to the challenges related to the rise of the knowledge and service economy? The historical institutionalist analysis finds that in adjusting collective skill formation to the knowledge economy, distinct pathways of gradual change are evolving in otherwise relatively similar systems. The dominant pattern of change tends to be the reinterpretation of institutions (conversion) in Switzerland but the addition of new institutions on top of old ones (layering) in Germany, with different implications for the future viability of collective skill formation. The comparison also shows that Switzerland features a more consensual approach to reform. The analysis indicates that country size – both in terms of geography and population – is a key factor underlying the type of change observed, contributing to the discussion of general scope conditions for educational policy reform. The presentation concludes with a reflection on the broader relevance and practical implications of these findings.

10:00am - 10:30amCoffee-Break
10:30am - 12:00pmPaper Session 6A: Mobility and school-to-work transitions
Location: Room 1
Session Chair: Daniela ROHRBACH-SCHMIDT
10:30am - 12:00pmPaper Session 6B: Workplace learning
Location: Room 2
Session Chair: Marina FIORI
10:30am - 12:00pmPaper Session 6C: Future skills and competences
Location: Room 3
Session Chair: Antje BARABASCH
10:30am - 12:00pmPaper Session 6D: International VET systems
Location: Room 4
Session Chair: Lorenzo BONOLI
12:00pm - 1:00pmLunch

                                                                    At 12:30pm in Hyhyve:

                                                                    - Meet researchers on digital learning in room 2 at the smoothy bar
                                                                    - Meet SFUVET’s international affairs unit at the lake

                                                                    Hyhyve VET Congress olatform

                                                                    For more information on Hyhyve, please visit the VET Congress website.

1:00pm - 1:40pmBest Paper Award
Location: Plenary Hall
1:45pm - 3:15pmPaper Session 7A: Returns to education
Location: Room 1
Session Chair: Filippo PUSTERLA
1:45pm - 3:15pmPaper Session 7B: Digitalisation and School
Location: Room 2
Session Chair: Alberto A. CATTANEO
1:45pm - 3:15pmSymposium 5: New Learning Cultures
Location: Room 3
Session Chair: Antje BARABASCH

Discussant: Patric RAEMY

Learning cultures are industry and even enterprise specific and can therefore also be viewed as ecosystems. In a learning ecosystem there is a dynamic interaction between the individual actors (apprentices, teachers, mentors, managers) and the various environments in which learning takes place (vocational school, inter-company courses, workplace, community-based and informal learning settings, virtual spaces) as well as the culture in which they are embedded (business-, school-, digital-, society culture etc.). Since economic changes and in particular digitalization in all researched industries have a major impact on the ways in which learning is conducted and competences are acquired, enterprises have the need to understand how they can facilitate apprenticeships within their premises.

The symposium comprises three presentations based on case studies in Swiss enterprises concerned with new learning cultures in apprenticeship training and a collaborating group in Germany, concerned with success factors for apprenticeships. The case studies focus on different aspects of innovative learning cultures: 1) role understanding and coping strategies of workplace trainers in the retail industry, 2) digital transformation within different learning ecosystems, 3) coaching as an approach to support learners in their competence development, and 4) the effect of self-assessment of transferable competences on subjective apprenticeship success. While the first three studies are based on semi-structured interviews, focus groups and observations and their qualitative analysis, the last presentation is based on a survey, linear regression and a stepwise model construction to show differences between the effects of the assessment of social and methodological competences. What all four studies and the researchers have in common is the role of competence development within apprenticeship training, the interest in the role of culture within all of that and a focus on workplace training.

3:20pm - 3:30pmFarewell
Location: Plenary Hall