Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

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Session Overview
Location: 4404
L:70
Date: Saturday, 19/May/2018
10:30am - 10:55amLD Sat1030-8
4404 
 

A Corpus to Promote Fluency in Group Discussions

K. Kato

Tokai University, Japan

This presentation will introduce a teaching method and materials aimed at helping Japanese students talk among themselves in English as they accomplish group tasks. The unique point of this method is that students wrote down Japanese expressions they wanted to say in English while trying a task-based group project. A native English and Japanese English teacher translated the expressions and made an English corpus for students to practice using in their group speaking tasks over throughout the semester. This activity and materials helps students notice their weak points and learn expressions and strategies for developing pragmatic fluency.

 
11:00am - 11:25amLD Sat1100-8
4404 
 

A Longitudinal Study of Motivational Changes in English Learning among Rural High School Students

H. Hsu

Kainan University, Taiwan

Motivation has been widely researched and recognized as a crucial factor affecting learners’ second and foreign language learning. This study examined changes in motivation of 92 Taiwanese rural junior high school students learning English through questionnaires over five semesters. Seven motivational factors including intrinsic, extrinsic, task value, control beliefs, self-efficacy, expectancy, anxiety were observed over the years. Results indicate that students start at a higher level of both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation compared to other motivational factors. However, the overall explanatory power of motivational factors gradually decreased over the years. Implications for understanding student levels of motivational changes are discussed.

 
2:00pm - 2:25pmLD Sat1400-8
4404 
 

Pedagogical Implications of Self-Reflection

A. Belobrovy

Reitaku University, Japan

Self-reflection can be recognized as a process that gives students opportunities to stop and be reflective about the learning that has taken place (Davies, Herbst, & Busick,2013). This presentation provides analysis of the pedagogical implications of Japanese EFL college students’ reflective diaries in a speaking and listening course.The diary entries were qualitatively analyzed from the perspective of their contribution to the learners' awareness of their language skill development and progress. In addition, the research findings were discussed on pedagogical implications of perception, goal-setting, learning difficulties and motivation, and curricular aspects such as setting customized curricular goals and adjusting activity choices.

 
2:30pm - 2:55pmSat1430-8: Associate Member Presentation
4404 
 

Way To Go! - Effective Listening and Speaking Practice Strategy

C. J. North

ESL Learning, Japan

Targeted for TOEIC levels 350-650, Way To Go! is a guided speaking and listening practice textbook and audio system that will effectively benefit both high school and university students. Using attainable and challenging exercises, the methodology promotes full participation and a positive supportive classroom atmosphere. Importantly, the 12 hours of easy access online audio allows for effective independent study. Discover a strategy that keeps students on task and produces recognizable improvement with students.

 
4:30pm - 4:55pmCUE Sat1630-8
4404 
 

The Necessity of English Presentation Skill Sets

R. Miles

Nanzan University, Japan

College and university educators often advise their students that learning how to deliver oral presentations in English is necessary for success in university courses, and ultimately, for future careers in various fields of employment. In attempt to verify this assumption, a qualitative pilot study was conducted with recent university graduates from a Japanese university (n=41). Findings revealed how often these recent graduates presented for work, what language they presented in, what types of presentations they delivered, and which techniques and skills they deemed necessary. These findings have important implications for university course designers and instructors alike.

 
5:00pm - 5:25pmCUE Sat1700-8
4404 
 

Teaching a University Seminar Class

B. Van Deusen

Nagasaki International University, Japan

Teaching a seminar class at the university level can be a challenging and rewarding experience. The presenter will reflect on his first three years as a seminar teacher in a Department of International Tourism, including his first class of graduating students. Through this, he will discuss topics such as the basic responsibilities of a seminar teacher, pastoral care, seminar curriculum, undergraduate thesis (aka sotsugyo kenkyu), seminar trips, and unexpected challenges. It is hoped that the content and discussion will be beneficial to all teachers, whether simply curious or very experienced.

 
5:30pm - 5:55pmSat1730-8
4404 
6:00pm - 6:25pmCUE Sat1800-8
4404 
 

Validating L2 Motivation Survey

T. Fukuda

International Christian University, Japan

This study investigates 37 survey items concerning L2 motivation. The hypothesis is that L2 is a broad concept within which five subcategories exist. These categories are termed; effort, integrativeness, instrumental motivation, and ideal L2 self. Seven to nine survey items are written for each subcategory, and a pilot study was conducted, in which 120 university students participated. The data was analyzed for internal consistency with Cronbach’s alpha, and for unidimensionality with the Rasch model, and four poorly performing items were removed. As a result, the comprehensive survey targeted at L2 motivation was finalized with 33 items.

 
Date: Sunday, 20/May/2018
11:00am - 11:25amSun1100-8
4404 
 

Conceptualizing a model for assessment in CLIL

M. A. J. deBoer

Akita International University, Japan

The efficiency of CLIL instruction has been researched extensively, demonstrating its positive impact on learners. Yet, an underrepresentation of assessment as the focus of CLIL research has resulted in an unclear understanding of what assessment in the CLIL classroom should look like or aim at. Applying CEFR principles and dynamic assessment practices, the premise that knowledge is co-constructed in social interaction through the use of language mediating subject matter and subject matter mediating the language is one starting point for conceptualising and implementing CLIL assessment. This monistic perspective of teaching, learning, and assessment in the CLIL classroom will be discussed.

 
11:30am - 11:55amSun1130-8
4404 
1:00pm - 1:25pmCUE Sun1300-8
4404 
 

Collaboration for Professional Development

W. M Gough1, D. Lucovich2

1Tokai University, Japan; 2The University of Nagano

This session will be a forum for JALT members to discuss ideas for increased cooperation between chapters and SIGs and how these can increase professional development opportunities and expand membership by meeting the needs of a broader range of teaching professionals. We will give examples of successful collaborations between chapters and SIGs to show how, by supporting each other, groups can scaffold professional growth and encourage engagement with the community. The presentation will be moderated by the Tokyo Chapter President and CUE SIG Coordinator, and will include Q & A and time for brainstorming ideas for future collaborations.

 
1:30pm - 1:55pmTD Sun1330-8
4404 
 

Collaboration for Professional Development

D. Lucovich1, W. M. Gough2

1The University of Nagano; 2Tokai University

This session will be a forum for JALT members to discuss ideas for increased cooperation between chapters and SIGs and how these can increase professional development opportunities and expand membership by meeting the needs of a broader range of teaching professionals. We will give examples of successful collaborations between chapters and SIGs to show how, by supporting each other, groups can scaffold professional growth and encourage engagement with the community. The presentation will be moderated by the Tokyo Chapter President and CUE SIG Coordinator, and will include Q & A and time for brainstorming ideas for future collaborations.

 
3:30pm - 3:55pmLD Sun1530-8
4404 
 

Learning to Globalize Through Localization

P. Joun

Tamagawa University, Japan

In order to foster an "international mindset" (openness to interact with the international community using English) amongst our students, it is first important to evaluate how comfortable and motivated our students feel to do so in the classroom. This presentation seeks to explore what our possible blind-spots are regarding Japanese leaner anxiety in the classroom due to different cultural mindsets between the students and foreign instructors, as well as how the strategic use of L1 in the classroom with beginner level students may be helpful in alleviating some of the students' apprehension about learning English with a foreign instructor.

 
4:00pm - 4:25pmLD Sun1600-8
4404 
 

Learner Development: A Focus on Habit

C. Macleod

Atomi University, Japan

For decades psychologists have detailed the importance of motivation in achieving goals. In this presentation, I will explain why an overreliance on motivation can actually be harmful for students and suggest focussing on daily study habits instead. I will highlight what teachers should think about when helping their students create habits and then introduce apps that students can use to maintain these habits and achieve their goals. This presentation will provide practical advice about how teachers can help students re-evaluate their language learning process.

 
4:30pm - 4:55pmLD Sun1630-8
4404 
 

L2 Learner Training in Group Work: A Japanese Need

S. Warrington

Nagoya University of Commerce & Business, Japan

With active learning currently in the vanguard of Japanese educational initiatives (MEXT, 2014), Japanese L2 learners are increasingly being asked to engage more in group work. However, because of particular cultural and educational concerns, forming and functioning ‘as’ a group can often prove quite difficult for them. This is only compounded by the fact that many L2 teachers often mistakenly assume these learners understand and know how to do it. With this in mind, this presentation will discuss the need for learner training in group work as a means to promote positive interdependence and individual accountability among Japanese L2 learners.

 
5:00pm - 5:25pmSun1700-8
4404 

 
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