Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
Presentations

W05: A user journey in OpenAIRE services (I)
Time: 10/Jun/2019: 9:00am-10:30am · Location: ESA-W-120

A user journey in OpenAIRE services through the lens of repository managers

Pedro Príncipe1, Paolo Manghi2, Leonard Mack3, André Vieira1, Jochen Schirrwagen4

1University of Minho, Portugal; 2CNR-ISTI, Italy; 3JISC, UK; 4Bielefeld University, Germany

OpenAIRE is the European Union initiative for an Open Access Infrastructure for Research in Europe that aims to establish an open and sustainable scholarly communication infrastructure responsible for the overall management, analysis, manipulation, provision, monitoring and cross-linking of all research outcomes (publications, related datasets, software and services) across existing, planned and future repositories. In the new phase of OpenAIRE, among the project’s goals, there is the one to repackage OpenAIRE services providing them as complete products to the final users.

This workshop puts forward an interactive session aiming to provide detailed information on the main services and tools targeting content providers and in which OpenAIRE team foresee to collect contributions from the repository manager’s community to further develop the portfolio of services offered by OpenAIRE.

The workshop will provide an interactive demo of the dashboard for content providers tools (repositories registration and validation, collection monitor and content enrichments), detailing mainly the catch-all broker service functionalities, such as the metadata enrichments and the usage statistics service. Additionally, this all day workshop will introduce attendees the new content acquisition policy, the Guidelines for Literature Repository Managers version 4.0 and the OpenAIRE graph.

Workshops-W05-455Príncipe.pdf


P1A: UX in practice
Time: 11/Jun/2019: 11:00am-12:30pm · Location: Lecture Hall A

Jisc Open Research Repository: Delivering a compelling User Experience

Tom Davey, Dom Fripp, John Kaye

Jisc, United Kingdom

Jisc has developed “Jisc Open Research Hub” - a solution to enable the research community to deposit and preserve research data and other digital objects. It includes repository, preservation, and reporting. This presentation discusses the repository – Jisc Open Research Repository – developed from scratch in alignment to a range of sector needs.

Jisc recognised the importance of delivering this service with a compelling user experience, and invested greatly into achieving this aim.

We explore the many motivations for the care given to the user experience and the different methods applied throughout the development process, which are felt to be highly relevant to those wishing to understand user-centred approaches to product development, especially in the repository / research space.

We discuss the design/development process, including the use of external and in-house expertise, and key activities including:

Requirements-gathering (inc. 16 pilot institutions, domain experts, other bodies)

Testing - including several phases of user acceptance testing, benchmarking, and standards (accessibility) testing

UX Governance

Jisc’s position in the UK HE / research sector, as well as the scale of the project provides us many domain-specific insights to share, ranging from broad methods, down to individual design decisions informed by research and domain expertise.

Paper-P1A-119Davey_a.pptx
Paper-P1A-119Davey_b.pdf


Poster reception
Time: 11/Jun/2019: 5:30pm-7:30pm

Jisc Open Research Hub – Supporting Open Scholarship

John Kaye, Dom Fripp, Tom Davey

Jisc, United Kingdom

Jisc’s Open Research Hub integrates a number of repository, preservation, reporting and storage platforms as a one stop shop for researchers and research managers. The service offers both open source and proprietary systems and allows data and metadata to be shared openly if required. The platform has been developed through years-long consultation with the UK HE research sector and sector bodies, along with contributions from both in-house Jisc and third-party experts.

The need for such a solution has arisen from the sector’s desires to achieve several, shared aims, including: greater collaboration; tackling the reproducibility crisis; enabling better research; and meeting funder requirements.

Jisc’s custom-built repository—the Open Research Repository—is part of the Jisc Open Research Hub. It’s built upon an extensive data model and rich messaging layer, providing users with a clean, simple, and easy-to-learn interface for the deposit, approval, and discovery of a range of outputs.

Jisc’s position in the UK higher education / research sector, as well as the scale of the service provides us with many domain-specific insights to share with OR2019 delegates, ranging from the broad methods mentioned above, down to individual design decisions informed by our research and domain expertise.

Posters--488Kaye.docx


P5B: Practice research in repositories (presentation and panel)
Time: 12/Jun/2019: 1:30pm-3:00pm · Location: Lecture Hall B

Practice-based arts research in repositories: how do we better engage with researchers to capture, manage and enable discoverability of this research?

Jenny Evans1, Andrew Gray2, John Kaye3, Dawn Pike4, Tom Renner5, Nicola Siminson4, Nina Watts1

1University of Westminster, United Kingdom; 2Goldsmiths, University of London, United Kingdom; 3Jisc, United Kingdom; 4Glasgow School of Art, United Kingdom; 5Haplo, United Kingdom

Repositories have historically focused on supporting traditional text-based outputs in STEM areas, capturing and making individual research publications openly available, and more recently the underpinning datasets. Funder policies focus on these outputs, resulting in greater awareness and usage of repositories amongst STEM researchers.

Practice-based arts research tends to be in non-text formats, and is often part of a wider, changing portfolio of work (including the original artefact and related documentation), elements of which may be captured in a publications repository, with associated documentation held in a data repository. This has often led to fractured discussions: those on open access take place in different forums to those on research data; and different teams may support these areas, including libraries, archives and research offices.

Much work has been done to customise repositories to more effectively capture this research. However, barriers to effectively engage with this community remain. Specific functionality requirements and issues include: records that enable open metadata and closed files; portfolios representing a changing body of work need updating over time; issues with file sizes and types, image quality and video streaming; restrictions imposed by repository software architecture, and interoperability with CRIS systems; and concerns with intellectual property rights and copyright.

Panels-P5B-395Evans.pdf


P5E: Standards and protocols for ingesting and harvesting
Time: 12/Jun/2019: 1:30pm-3:00pm · Location: Lecture Hall M

SWORDv3: Standardising Interoperability for Data Repositories

Richard Jones1, Neil Jefferies2, Lars Holm Nielsen3, Dom Fripp4

1Cottage Labs LLP, United Kingdom; 2University of Oxford, United Kingdom; 3CERN; 4Jisc

SWORDv3 is the most recent update on the SWORD deposit and interoperability standard. This new version brings with it enhancements to support research data and other modern use cases for machine-to-machine communication. This presentation will discuss the process of developing the new version of the standard, the key changes since the last version, and the community governance and management of the specification going forward.

Paper-P5E-250Jones,Jefferies_a.txt


P6A: ORCID in repositories
Time: 12/Jun/2019: 3:30pm-5:00pm · Location: Lecture Hall A

Cultivating ORCIDs - growing a sustainable national consortium

Balviar Notay, Adam Vials Moore, Monica Duke

Jisc, United Kingdom

Jisc runs the ORCID consortium in the UK. Since the start of the consortium in 2015 it was our mission to improve ORCID uptake, improve the technical infrastructure and make the consortium a sustainable concern. We currently have 86 members who have just renewed their membership for 3 years and getting to this point has been a journey which has required getting national agreement with funders/stakeholders, running pilot projects through to setting up service infrastructure and developing a business model for sustainability. To provide an attractive service which is sustainable we have had to spin a number of plates and continue to look at ways in which we can provide value for the consortium such as developing software to influencing change with third party vendors.

Paper-P6A-245Notay,Duke_a.pptx


P6E: Developer Track
Time: 12/Jun/2019: 3:30pm-5:00pm · Location: Lecture Hall M

Show and Tell: SHERPA Romeo's New API

Adam Field

Jisc, United Kingdom

The Beta launch of Jisc's Romeo Service is a significant milestone towards the completion of the v2.Sherpa project. Our services now all share the same platform, user interface, data model and API.

The API is lightweight, RESTful and returns UFT-8 JSON. It supports the export of all first class object types contained in the system, namely Publishers, Publisher Policies, Publications, Repositories (with attached policies), and Funders (with attached policies). These can be exported in paged, filtered collections.

We would like to give a live demonstration of the v2.Sherpa API to the dev track, invite the attendees to informally have a go, and have a brief discussion focused around further user requirements and use-cases (to be continued outside of the track).

Developer Track-P6E-107Field_a.pptx


P7C: 24x7s: New repositories and tools
Time: 13/Jun/2019: 9:00am-10:30am · Location: Lecture Hall C

Introducing the New Sherpa Romeo

Jane HS Anders

Jisc, United Kingdom

For the past 15 years, Sherpa Romeo has for provided a vital service to the Open Access sector; providing easy-to-read interpretations of publishers’ self-archiving policies. Over this time, we have seen Open Access gain widespread acceptance. As policies and requirements have evolved, the underlying database struggled to keep up with the shift in use-cases that resulted.

Due to this, we have been working on a complete rewrite of our platforms and a migration of our data to the new, improved data model. Following the recent beta launch of the new Sherpa Romeo, we would like to show our work to the conference.

This presentation reports on the work carried out in order to upgrade the service so that it meets not only the current needs of the open access sector, but also maintains flexibility to meet future needs.

The new services includes:

- Greater clarity of publisher policies

- Revised inclusion criteria

This works ensures that our compliance services are able to meet the needs to changes to funder requirements such as Plan S.

24x7-P7C-247Anders_b.pptx


P7C: 24x7s: New repositories and tools
Time: 13/Jun/2019: 9:00am-10:30am · Location: Lecture Hall C

Jisc Open Research Hub – Supporting Open Scholarship

John Kaye, Dom Fripp, Tom Davey

Jisc, United Kingdom

Jisc’s Open Research Hub integrates a number of repository, preservation, reporting and storage platforms as a one stop shop for researchers and research managers. The service offers both open source and proprietary systems and allows data and metadata to be shared openly if required. The platform has been developed through years-long consultation with the UK HE research sector and sector bodies, along with contributions from both in-house Jisc and third-party experts.

The need for such a solution has arisen from the sector’s desires to achieve several, shared aims, including: greater collaboration; tackling the reproducibility crisis; enabling better research; and meeting funder requirements.

Jisc’s custom-built repository—the Open Research Repository—is part of the Jisc Open Research Hub. It’s built upon an extensive data model and rich messaging layer, providing users with a clean, simple, and easy-to-learn interface for the deposit, approval, and discovery of a range of outputs.

Jisc’s position in the UK higher education / research sector, as well as the scale of the service provides us with many domain-specific insights to share with OR2019 delegates, ranging from the broad methods mentioned above, down to individual design decisions informed by our research and domain expertise.

24x7-P7C-487Kaye_b.pptx
 
 
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