Conference Agenda

To read the abstracts of submissions, click on the title of the session at the top of the cell, not on the title of the submission.  

 
 
Session Overview
Date: Thursday, 19/May/2022
11:00am - 1:00pmTrEDMIL SIG

Training, Education and Development for Medical Information and Library professionals (TrEDMIL) SIG will meet in advance of EAHIL 2022 via Webex. An inivitation and meeting information was sent out via TrEDMIL- and EAHIL-mailing lists.

Date: Monday, 30/May/2022
1:00pm - 5:00pmEAHIL board meeting
Location: Conference Centre Engels (external location)
Date: Tuesday, 31/May/2022
9:00am - 12:00pmCEC2
Location: Conference Centre Engels (external location)
 
ID: 172 / CEC2: 1
Continuing Education (CEC) Session
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Expert searching for health care guidelines

Ingeborg van Dusseldorp1, Hans Ket2

1Knowledge Institute of the Association of Medical Specialists, Netherlands, The; 2Amsterdam UMC, locatation VUmc


van Dusseldorp-Expert searching for health care guidelines-172.docx
 
9:00am - 12:00pmCEC3
Location: Conference Centre Engels (external location)
 
ID: 202 / CEC3: 1
Continuing Education (CEC) Session
Topics: Data

Introduction to data handling and fetching data from web services with OpenRefine

Evamaria Krause1, Michaela Beisser1, Helge Knüttel2

1University Library, University of Augsburg, Germany; 2University Library, University of Regensburg, Germany

Biography and Bibliography
Evamaria is subject librarian for medicine and head of the medical library at Augsburg University Library, Germany. She is part of the library’s research data management and teaching teams. Since 2018, she has organized and taught different Library Carpentry workshops.
Publications: https://www.uni-augsburg.de/de/organisation/bibliothek/uber-uns/team-der-ub/evamaria-krause/

Michaela is a librarian at the medical library at Augsburg University Library, Germany, since 2018. She has a focus on information literacy.

Helge is subject and liaison librarian for medicine with University Library of Regensburg, Germany. He enjoys teaching and has a special interest in systematic searching, systematic reviews and other forms of evidence synthesis as well as research methodology. He is an EAHIL council member for Germany.
Publications: https://www.uni-regensburg.de/bibliothek/faecher/medizin/ansprechpartner/index.html#publist_hk

Krause-Introduction to data handling and fetching data from web services with OpenRefine-202.docx
 
9:00am - 3:45pmCEC1
Location: Conference Centre Engels (external location)
 
ID: 183 / CEC1: 1
Continuing Education (CEC) Session
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Efficiency in systematic searching

Wichor Bramer, Elise Krabbendam, Sabrina Gunput, Maarten Engel

Erasmus MC, Netherlands, The


Bramer-Efficiency in systematic searching-183.pdf
 
9:00am - 3:45pmEAHIL board meeting
Location: Conference Centre Engels (external location)
12:45pm - 3:45pmCEC4
Location: Conference Centre Engels (external location)
 
ID: 225 / CEC4: 1
Continuing Education (CEC) Session
Topics: Resources and metrics

How to introduce the use of next generation metrics at your institution

Alicia Fátima Gomez

TU Wien Bibliothek, Austria

Biography and Bibliography
Alicia is a librarian and scholarly communication specialist, with international professional experience in several areas of research and knowledge management (open science, scientometrics, research data and library management). Co-founder of the EAHIL EVALUATION AND METRICS special interest group.

She currently works at the Technische Universität Wien Bibliothek (Austria) as Head of Scientometrics and Data Visualisation. Previously she worked as OPENAIRE NOAD at the FECYT, the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology; and was beforehand Research & Scholarly Communications Information Manager at the University of Hertfordshire (UK), and Head of the Library and Information Service at the Spanish National Cardiovascular Research Centre (Spain).

Gomez-How to introduce the use of next generation metrics-225.pdf
 
4:00pm - 5:30pmEAHIL Council meeting
Location: Conference Centre Engels (external location)
6:00pm - 8:00pmFirst timers meeting
Location: Euromast (external location)
Date: Wednesday, 01/June/2022
9:00am - 9:15amOpening Session
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Wichor Bramer
Session Chair: Tiina Marketta Heino
9:15am - 10:15amP1: Keynote Speaker: Paul Smit
Location: Willem Burgerzaal

Philosopher and comedian Paul Smit is one of the most in demand speakers in the Netherlands. He gives interactive and humorous presentations about human behavior and the brain and talks about influence, change, innovation and collaboration. 

 
ID: 2247 / P1: 1
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Changing Perspective

Paul Smit

Philiosopher and Comedian

Philosopher and comedian Paul Smit is one of the most in demand speakers in the Netherlands. He gives interactive and humorous presentations about human behavior and the brain and talks about influence, change, innovation and collaboration. Paul Smit graduated with an essay on ‘the evolution of human consciousness’. He wrote ten books about philosophy, psychology and neuroscience and knows how to convey complex issues in a comprehensive, humorous and practical way.

 
10:15am - 10:45amCoffee Break
Location: Willem Burgerfoyer
10:15am - 10:45amSIG chairs meeting
10:45am - 12:00pm1.1: Oral Presentations - Resources and Metrics (1)
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Robin Filippus Ottjes
 
10:45am - 11:00am
ID: 128 / 1.1: 1
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Maximise the research impact of your institution: a use case of Ghent University Hospital

Greet Wieme1, Muguet Koobasi1, Ann De Meulemeester1, Anniek Toye2, Renaat R. Peleman1, Nele S. Pauwels1

1Knowledge Centre for Health Ghent, Ghent University, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 2Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

Aim: Healthcare professionals and hospital policy makers are providing the best possible care on a daily basis, ensuring sustainable hospital performance and effectively managing costs. Next to healthcare analytics, key performance indicators reflecting the scientific output and impact are crucial for academic hospitals. Research metrics - traditional and next-generation - drive policy decisions and allocation of funds.

Methods: A bibliometric analysis of the impact and output of Ghent University Hospital was performed using InCites and Altmetric Explorer. The analysis was performed for the hospital and for each of the approximately 60 medical departments. The results of these analyses were presented to various policy-making bodies of the hospital and Ghent University that is the hospitals’ parent organisation. To optimise our analysis, we formulated actions on the level of the analysis tool and actions towards researchers.

Results: Thanks to the recruitment of a new member on our team, an awareness campaign for our researchers was rolled out. As a result of information sessions, workshops, an infographic, an interactive Power BI presentation and personal assistance, we made our researchers aware of how to correctly affiliate to our hospital and to create, use and update their ORCID iDs. Additionally, medical departments were encouraged to standardise their affiliation to their department. We started to contact Ghent University Hospital employees with an ORCID iD to connect their ORCID iD to their Ghent University profile. Over a 7 week period, we had a success rate of 44% (38/86), but this is continuously evolving.

Furthermore, we analysed articles published by our researchers that were not automatically linked to our hospital in Web of Science. We identified synonyms and variants that were used for our institution. By adding these synonyms and variants in Web of Science, more than 2000 publications (>600 publications in 2016-2020) were additionally assigned to our institution. This resulted in an increase of 8% of publications correctly linked with Ghent University Hospital and in an important gain of analytical information in InCites.

Conclusion: Generally speaking for researchers, the availability of metrics depends on their research output being available online. Research that is openly available, will be accessible to more people and will, therefore, have a greater impact. Recently, xxxx initiated a project to increase the visibility of research being conducted at Ghent University Hospital, which is the cornerstone of research metrics. Thanks to our two-sided approach – on the level of the researcher and the analysis tool – analyses conducted for our institution are more accurate and will be increasingly more accurate in the future. Research performed at Ghent University (Hospital) will thus become more visible to the public and the government for policy decisions and financial support. During this session, experiences and lessons learnt will be shared to inspire others who perform bibliometric analyses

Human touch of your submission in your abstract: We note that despite all the information campaigns and sessions, personal support on bibliometrics is vital. We will, therefore, continue to work on this aspect.



11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 139 / 1.1: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

The use of Handle System on institutional repositories and their connection with alternative metrics

Elena Pastor-ramon1, Lluís Codina2, Cristòfol Rovira2

1Virtual Health Sciences of the Balearic Islands, University Pompeu Fabra, Spain; 2University Pompeu Fabra, Spain

Introduction

There are about 164 institutional repositories (IR) from EAHIL countries registered in OpenDoar. Many of these repositories are not using the Handle System (HS) as a persistent identifier (PI).

Also, they are not showing the altmetrics offered by Altmetric and PlumX, and many have not installed the API that allows to measure the altmetrics of the documents in these IR.

PI with which the altmetrics work take into account the DOI, if the document does not have it, PMID or the ArxiV identifier are detected. The HS, although the instructions offered by the providers of these metrics tell us that it works as a PI, the reality is that the only way to see the impact in a document with just HS assigned is to put the badge of one of these tools or installing their APIs.

Aims

To show how many IR from EAHIL member countries are assigning handles to their records, as well as to know if these repositories are collecting information from Altmetric and PlumX.

Also, we want to provide a checklist with those characteristics that an IR should have to provide as much information as possible on these metrics to be efficient and give value to the documents deposited in it.

Method

A search was carried out in OpenDoar limiting to IR, which had journal articles and limiting to the subjects "Health and Medicine" and Psychology, then we searched limited to each country with EAHIL partners. An Excel document was created in which we added the fields of the institution, URL of the repository, if it had a handle, if it had other persistent identifiers, if it had information on alternative metrics and if it did not have this information if it could at least be tracked by these bibliometric tools.

Results

Many of the European repositories are not assigning a HS to their records, they give generic URLs that could mean that if that repository changed domains its records could no longer be found and all the information for that record would have to be provided again. By not providing a handle, the different social impact measurement tools may not be able to detect this information. Furthermore, although these repositories do assign the HS, by not having installed the API or not having notified Altmetric or PlumX so that they can be tracked by them, they do not allow these metrics to detect the information of the repository's records, which means that the impact they may be having is not known.

Conclusion

Although great advances have been made in the creation of IR, many of them are still in elementary stages. Our analysis provides an insight into the current situation of institutional repositories in health, medicine, and psychology from EAHIL partners in terms of the use of PI, especially the HS. We also show a picture of how altmetrics are being used by country, we want to show if they are being given the importance that Altmetric and PlumX seem to have in theory.

Biography and Bibliography
Elena Pastor-Ramon, a librarian from the Virtual Health Sciences Library (Bibliosalut) since 2003 and Ph.D. student from the University Pompeu Fabra since 2020.

Pastor-Ramon, Elena; Páez, Virgili (2021). «Mejora del impacto mediante difusión de la investigación en redes sociales: #PublicaSalutIB». Investigación Bibliotecológica: archivonomía, bibliotecología e información, v. 35, n. 88, p. 29.
https://doi.org/10.22201/iibi.24488321xe.2021.88.58355

Pastor-Ramon, Elena; Codina, Lluís; Rovira, Cristòfol (2021). «Value of Digital Object Identifier in Academic Journals and Its Influence on Social and Academic Impact: Nursing Journals Experience». En: Abstract Book Workshop Proceedings Abstract Book,

García-puente, María; Pastor-ramon, Elena; Agirre, Oskia; Morán, José-maría; García-puente, María; Pastor-ramon, Elena (2020). «Research note. Open letter to the users of the new PubMed: a critical appraisal», pp. 1-5.

Dr. Lluís Codina and Dr. Cristòfol Rovira, are professors from the University Pompeu Fabra.


11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 229 / 1.1: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Innovations in preprint peer review - What new forms of peer review does preprinting facilitate?

Susana Oliveira Henriques1,2,3, Ludo Waltman1,2, Stephen Pinfield1,4, Naemin Rzayeva1,2

1Research on Research Institute; 2Centre for Science and Technology Studies, Leiden University; 3School of Medicine, University of Lisbon; 4University of Sheffield

Introduction

The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the importance of an effective scholarly communication system. Traditional scholarly communication channels, particularly peer-reviewed journals, have been put under pressure to deal with Covid-19-related research in a timely way. At the same time, there was an unprecedented rise in the use of preprints by the biomedical scientific community. Preprint servers make work available rapidly (albeit usually in a form before peer review) and openly, meaning they can be accessed in a timely way by scientists, policymakers, medical practitioners, journalists, and citizens in general. Although preprints have played an essential role in the dissemination of research about Covid-19, concerns remain about quality assurance and misinformation as potential risks to public health.

Aim

We provide an overview of recent innovative projects that enable evaluative peer interactions (e.g., comments, recommendations, reviews), addressing the need for more transparent and responsible use of preprints. Also, we identify future trends and provide recommendations. Finally, we aim to promote discussion about the role of preprint peer review in the scholarly communication system and the contributions that different actors in the system can make to these developments.

Method/ Program Description

Based on the ReimagineReview registry developed by ASAPbio, we collected information on 44 projects that provide innovation in peer review, particularly peer review of preprints. Detailed information on each project was collected through online research and organised into four main categories: i) general description; ii) peer review process; iii) sustainability; and iv) maturity.

Results/ Evaluation

Globally, data show us that different groups (e.g., individuals, publishers, and professional societies), from various disciplinary fields, with different aims and needs, are involved in the development of innovative projects to increase speed, quality, transparency, incentivisation, or fairness of peer review. Also, we observe the emergence of different types of quality assessment (e.g., free-form commenting, badges, and quantitative scores), new patterns of communication (e.g., interaction between authors, reviewers and the public in general) and innovative approaches to peer review (e.g., pre or post-publication peer review, public commenting, public recommendation, quantitative scores or summaries of the evidence). As this is an ongoing project, we can only present provisional results mainly from the first two categories listed above.

Conclusion

It is too early to assess the long-term sustainability and impact of the various projects and the way in which these projects fit the aims and needs of different stakeholders. Nevertheless, our work does show that several valuable services are being provided. It also shows how these services could potentially improve trust in research reporting, and it highlights future trends in scholarly communication and peer review.

Human Touch (Recommended)

The scientific peer review system is overburdened, and there appears to be a growing dissatisfaction among authors, reviewers and journal editors. Our work suggests improvements that could make the system more informal, collaborative, rapid, open, public and transparent, which will hopefully help to turn peer review into a more rewarding experience for all stakeholders involved.

Biography and Bibliography
Susana Oliveira Henriques is an External PhD candidate at the Centre for Science and Technology Studies, Leiden University. Susana’s research interests include innovation in scholarly communication and peer review, with a special focus on dissemination and quality control of biomedical research. She is also interested in research management, science policy and responsible use of metrics. Susana holds a degree in History and a Master in Library Sciences. She is head of the Central Library - Center for Information and Documentation of the University of Lisbon School of Medicine, where she is also a guest teacher of Evidence Based Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Public Health.
ORCID: 0000-0002-0947-5083

Recent publication:
Waltman, Ludo; Pinfield, Stephen; Rzayeva, Narmin; Oliveira Henriques, Susana; Fang, Zhichao; Brumberg, Johanna; et al. (2021): Scholarly communication in times of crisis: The response of the scholarly communication system to the COVID-19 pandemic. Research on Research Institute. Report.https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.17125394.v1


11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 145 / 1.1: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Effective training to enhance author tracking citations to boost research evaluation

Elisabetta Poltronieri, Cristina Mancini, Giuse Ardita, Donatella Gentili, Maria Salvatorina Graziani, Paola Pecci, Filippo Santoro, Monica Zedda, Paola De Castro

Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy

Introduction
Author disambiguation (variants of author name) stands for a crucial point for information professionals committed to updating authors' profile in citation databases of multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed literature (Web of Science and Scopus).

By implementing the training of the internal research staff on how measuring impact of scientific papers, the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS, Italian National Institute of Health) is committed to fully comply with the internal policy on archiving procedures and promoting open access publications, recently signed by the ISS President.

Aim
ISS has recently set up an internal task force aiming at supporting internal research staff (about 1000 people) in the daily practice of checking paper lists under their profile, to avoid misidentification and to get effective metrics score (H index etc.). This is a central objective of research evaluation process and reporting of annual activities to obtain funding. The constant effort is that of providing current training and continuing educational tools to enable researchers managing their own profiles on the platforms devoted to host citations and metrics.
Method/ Program Description

A methodological approach has been developed to help researchers to become more familiar in building on their unique identifiers (ResearcherID, ScopusID and ORCID), thus mantaining accurate accounts.

Further efforts for improving quality of scientific communication and transparency of research results (publications and data) are being undertaken within a recently set ISS working group on Integrity of research.

In this perspective, the ISS institutional repository OAI – PMH compliant, PublISS (https://publ.iss.it), is planning to implement the ORCID API aimed at linking authors and all their name variants with their publications. Interconnecting PublISS with ORCID Registry can help populating author profiles, thus improving search and retrieval of biomedical literature to support networking and collaboration.

Results/ Evaluation

Critical issues linked to changing platforms interfaces, level of author’s autonomy in managing their accounts, number of researchers equipped with unique identifiers and testing of users' navigation skills will be analysed and evaluated.
Conclusion

Deeply inspiring activities for assessing research effectiveness were those carried on under the umbrella of DORA (Declaration of Research Assessment) and TARA (Advance Research Assessment) project. Both initiatives aim at re-affirming the importance of best practises for the evaluation of scholarly research based on a responsible use of metrics, thus avoiding inappropriate manipulation of quantitative research impact, in view of adopting criteria and standards to reform research assessment.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This work is intended to strenghten close collobaration and networking culture among colleagues dealing with different tasks within the same Instituion (IT expert, librarians, scientific information professionals, researchers) in order to improve the whole institutional performance.

All the above-described components of the scholarly communication system accelerate the process of a virtuous engagement of all stakeholders acting within the scientific research community.

Biography and Bibliography
Elisabetta Poltronieri, is working at the Scientific Communication Service of the Italian Institute of Health, the leading research body in Italy in the field of public health.
Her main responsibilities include bibliographic editing and the diffusion of scientific work published by the Institute research staff.


11:45am - 12:00pm
ID: 134 / 1.1: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Library Challenges in Promoting Open Access at University

Inga Znotina, Eliza Anna Actina, Signe Riekstina-Pala

Rigas Stradins university, Latvia

Preparation

During the last two years, one of the main challenges of the Library has been the provision and promotion of open access at Rīga Stradiņš University (RSU), as the Library played a leading role in organising all processes:

- preparation of open access and Institutional e-resource repository policy and guideline documents;

- development of the RSU Research Information System (RIS) Pure and the RSU Institutional open access e-resource repository;

- training for Library and teaching staff;

- addition of the Support for Research section to the University Library website.

Within this very short period, the Library had to identify the resources and actions needed to ensure the provision of open access at Rīga Stradiņš University, as such an action policy has not yet been approved at the national level in Latvia.

Implementation

RSU Library drew up three important documents: RSU open access policy; policy for RSU Institutional open access e-resource repository; guidelines for RSU Institutional open access e-resource repository.

The Library staff participated in the initial research, testing and evaluation to select the most appropriate RIS tool between Elsevier Pure and Thomson Reuters Converis, eventually creating a proposal about the benefits of Elsevier Pure. 6 Library staff members participated in remote Pure training, conducted by a representative of Elsevier. Since then, the Library has developed 5 instructions on adding different publications to Pure, a coordinating process description and a video instruction on importing publications from online databases (e.g. Scopus, Web of Science).

From 2006 to June 2020, the metadata of RSU staff publications (for 2005-2019) was entered into the Library Information System (LIS) ALEPH500, constructing an electronic bibliographic database. In November 2020, the Library staff started entering that year’s publications into RIS Pure, adding full-text links for open access publications. By the end of 2021, all available RSU staff publications from Scopus and Web of Science have been added to Pure. Together with the Research Department, Library staff members also provide training to RSU staff about contributing to RIS Pure.

RIS Pure has been linked to the RSU Institutional open access e-resource repository – validated publications are imported and compiled. An RSU Institutional repository work group of departmental representatives and guided by the Library was set up in 2019, allowing to start adding digitised historical dissertations. Since 2020, the Library has been collaborating and actively developing the repository: planning resource communities; establishing metadata standards; defining resource access levels and user rights; and adding digitised historical monographs. Development of the Study material repository also continues in order to accumulate open access educational resources.

The new Support for Research section of the Library webpage was developed to provide researchers with RSU open access documents, links to data sources and various guides.

Conclusion

Our experience shows that the Library can implement an open access policy within its University without a joint national policy and in a short period of time, by developing close cooperation with all the participating departments of Rīga Stradiņš University.

 
10:45am - 12:00pm1.2: Oral Presentations - Data
Location: Van Beuningen
Session Chair: Witold Kozakiewicz
 
10:45am - 11:00am
ID: 112 / 1.2: 1
Oral Presentation
Topics: Data

The Radboud University Data Repository: digital preservation throughout the research lifecycle

Didi Lamers, Inge Slouwerhof

Radboud University Library, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

Introduction

At Radboud University a new tool has recently been developed and put into service to archive, publish and share digital research data acquired, processed, and analysed by researchers of the University. This novel repository is named the Radboud University Data Repository.
Aim

To serve researchers throughout the research lifecycle, the mission of the repository is threefold:

  1. To offer long-term internal data preservation for internal re-use
  2. To offer long-term internal data preservation for reproducibility and scientific integrity
  3. To offer FAIR open access data sharing with the external scientific community

Method

The repository allows researchers to archive their data into three types of data collections, collectively corresponding to a single research project. Raw, unprocessed data of the project are preserved in Data Acquisition Collections (DACs). The research process is documented in Research Documentation Collections (RDCs). Data on which a scientific publication is based are stored and publicly shared in Data Sharing Collections (DSCs), which stimulate FAIR data preservation. The collection types serve the goals of long-term internal data preservation for re-use, reproducibility, and scientific integrity (DACs and RDCs) and of FAIR open access data sharing with the external scientific community (DSCs).

The <our organisation> Data Repository is suitable for daily data handling and researchers can collaborate on their data with colleagues from inside and outside of the university by extensive role-based access management. When a data collection is complete, it can be archived (DACs and RDCs) or published (DSCs). Access to published DSCs can be managed by the researcher based on a wide variety of Data Use Agreements. All data collections are made findable by metadata indexing in a searchable resource, the assignment of a persistent identifier (DOI), and the availability of rich metadata fields.
Results

The repository was launched in January 2021. By now (November 2021) it contains 64 data collections. A survey will be used to evaluate user satisfaction.
Conclusion

With the launch of the RDR, <our organisation> now has a tool available that promotes FAIR research data and enhances the impact of its research.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Without having to spend a lot of time on research data management, researchers of <our organisation> can now easily archive or publicly share their research data, enhancing the impact and reproducibility of their research.

Biography and Bibliography
After the successful defense of my PhD thesis in February 2021, I started working as a research data management specialist at Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands. I work as a data steward and product owner of the University’s institutional repository: the Radboud Data Repository. Our repository has been in use since January of this year. A large part of my daily activities consists of communicating with researchers, data stewards, research data management specialists, data architects, and developers to incorporate their feedback and insights in order to maximize the value of our repository. My background is in biology, with a master’s degree in the Molecular Mechanisms of Disease (research master at Radboud University) and a PhD in neuroscience/biophysics at the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, Italy. My research activities taught me about epilepsy, electrophysiology, in vivo imaging, and writing data analysis software, but also about the importance of re-usability and reproducibility of research data. I am happy that in my new position as Data Steward and product owner of the RDR I can help to make the research process more efficient.


11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 147 / 1.2: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Data

Implementing new tool during the pandemic distance work - case REDCap

Katri Larmo, Tiina Heino, Iina Hepolehto

Helsinki University Library, Terkko Medical Campus Library, Finland

Introduction: REDCap is a tool for capturing research data, also sensitive and personal data. It was created in 2004 at Vanderbilt University (USA) and is now widely used all over the world. University of Helsinki got REDCap license in 2020 and the tool was launched for customer use in 2021.

Aim: We describe the process of learning REDCap and starting the user education, all this during the pandemic distance work. How to communicate effectively, learn both together and independently, keep up the good spirit and sense of community and work intensively, with still enough time to breath and rest? The focus is on the individual information specialist point of view.

Program Description:

The initial REDCap admin team included 5 persons; 3 from the library and 2 from the IT-center. The system is owned by the library. REDCap was licensed in 2020 and launched to customers in 2021. The user support started with information campaign, webinar sessions and establishing REDCap-support-email. The first webinars were given from the survey data point of view, with good feedback.

However, we soon discovered the need for webinars specializing to the clinical research data point of view. It was decided that Terkko information specialist gives these webinars, with the support of research data team members. This started intensive learning – both for the REDCap tool and for deeper understanding of the clinical research process. In October 2021 the first two webinars of “REDCap – clinical data” were given and since that we have collectively supported the customers with their REDCap projects. One of the Terkko information specialists is now on the admin team of REDCap.

Evaluation:

From the individual information specialist point of view, the key things to make this happen were 1) Great support from colleagues and learning together 2) Strong motivation: we were very happy to get REDCap available for our customers. 3) Deadlines: “test webinar” given to colleagues, right after the summer holidays, gave good structure for working 4) Very generous sharing of information also form other organizations; e.g. an experienced REDCap-user and biostatistician from the University of Turku giving us a “private” webinar session 5) Active utilization of excellent REDCap webinars from YouTube – thanks to the distance work there were lot of good webinars available 6) Change to make stupid questions 7) Aiming to “growth mindset” (see Dr. Carol Dweck) 8) Customers’ questions and real life cases 9) Problem solving together with good colleagues and customers.

Conclusion:

When implementing new services, especially in exceptional times such as the covid pandemic and total distance working, it is crucial to have the good and continuous communication with colleagues, a strong sense of community and motivation.

Human Touch:

With this presentation we would like to invite EAHIL colleagues to this discussion – both about the practicalities of REDCap and creating a good supportive atmosphere that carries us through to the “new normal”.

Biography and Bibliography
Dweck CS. Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. Updated Edition. New York: Ballantine Books; 2007. 320 s.


11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 117 / 1.2: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Data

Archiving and publishing research data at University Medical Centre Utrecht

Nico Poppelier

University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands, Netherlands, The

Introduction

In 2019 University Medical Centre Utrecht embarked on a project aimed at implementing a platform for archiving and disclosing the results of scientific research. Two fundamental concepts underlying this project are Open Science and FAIR. In this presentation we will describe the results of the project.

Aim

The goal of the project was to implement a platform that would enable researchers to archive the results of their research projects and to disclose these results to colleagues within and outside the institute. Fundamental concepts here are Open Science and FAIR. Sharing data is an important step that a research institute should take to give substance to the concept of Open Science, a component of the research strategy of University Medical Centre Utrecht . In order to optimally share data, it is crucial to make this data findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR). For this, we need new IT platforms, but also clear policies and guidelines.

Method/ Program Description

Using a list of criteria developed by a working group of the Research Data Alliance, we evaluated several software packages, including Archivematica, Dataverse, DSpace, CKAN and YODA (a development of Utrecht University). Some of the important criteria were: GDPR compliance, metadata support, check-sums, and conversion to durable file formats.

We concluded that none of the specified software packages matched our requirements for both archiving and disclosing research data. However, a combination of two software packages, Archivematica and Dataverse, turned out to be the best solution for our institute. Therefore we decided to divide the project in three parts:

  1. implement an internal archive based on Archivematica
  2. implement DataverseNL as our preferred repository for sharing data
  3. develop an integration between Archivematica and Dataverse

Results/ Evaluation

In July 2021 we started using DataverseNL with our own guidelines and process description.

In December 2021 we will start using the Archivematica archive. The integration will be realized in the first quarter of 2022.

Conclusion

Developing and implementing the processes around these IT platforms proved to be very time-consuming. We also invested a lot of time in communication with researchers, writing documentation and developing training material. Data managers play an important role, since they provide support to the researchers. The principal investigators also play an important role, both in the process of publishing a dataset on DataverseNL, and in the process of assessing a request for access to a published dataset.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Introducing new IT platforms is only a small part of this project, since we require researchers to organize their work differently: structure your research folder, document all steps in your preparation and analysis, collect metadata for all data files, and document the conditions under which data can be shared. Open Science and FAIR are valuable concepts, but they do not come for free: researchers are required to spend extra time on meeting these requirements, supported by data managers. Most researchers are willing to do this, provided they are acknowledged and rewarded in some way.

Biography and Bibliography
1978-1984 MSc theoretical physics, University of Utrecht.
1984-1989 PhD theoretical nuclear physics, University of Utrecht.
1990-2000 Elsevier Science
Since 2002 I work at the University Medical Centre Utrecht, initially in the field of healthcare IT, but since early 2019 in the field of research IT.
My list of publications can be found through my ORCID identifier 0000-0002-1246-4342.


11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 230 / 1.2: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Data

Research Data Management for the Health Sciences at the Medical University of Lodz: Data Management Plans.

Agnieszka Goszczyńska

The Medical University of Lodz, Poland

At the Information and Library Center of the Medical University of Lodz, we are constantly developing how we support researchers. To improve our skills, we take part in courses and share good practices with other librarians. Nowadays, the most popular topic is open data. This presentation will mainly discuss research data supporting services (data management plan, legal issues, metadata standards, support for data archiving and preserving) and training activities: workshops, online training, and face-to-face consultations (DMP's). I will also talk about training for librarians and the Polish Working Group of the DSCC IN PL (Data Stewardship Competence Centers), in which we are taking part.

 
10:45am - 12:00pm1.3: Workshop Professionals Connected
Location: Schadee
 
ID: 233 / 1.3: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Professionals Connected

Libraries After COVID-19: A Learning Conversation

Nicole Capdarest-Arest

University of California, Davis, United States of America

Biography and Bibliography
Nicole, as Head of the Blaisdell Medical Library at UC Davis, spearheads biomedical library initiatives and partners on research, education and clinical care with faculty, staff and students in the UC Davis School of Medicine, Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, Clinical and Translational Science Center, UC Davis Health, and the affiliated research centers and institutes. Her special areas of focus include leadership, design thinking, program development, instructional design, and optimizing quality information retrieval processes.

Selected publications:

In press: JMLA commentary on resilience engineering

Capdarest-Arest, N., & Gray, J. M. (2020). Health sciences library leadership skills in an interprofessional landscape: a review and textual analysis. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA, 108(4), 547.
 
10:45am - 12:00pm1.4: Workshop Information Retrieval
Location: Zeelenberg
 
ID: 190 / 1.4: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Have a go at completing a search summary table

Alison Bethel, Naomi Shaw

University of Exeter, United Kingdom

 
12:00pm - 12:30pmOne Minute Madness Poster Presentations
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
12:30pm - 2:00pmLunch / Exhibition
Location: Willem Burgerfoyer
1:00pm - 2:00pmPoster Presentations 1: Uneven numbers
Location: Willem Burgerfoyer
 
ID: 199 / Poster Presentations 1: 1
Poster
Topics: Education

Identification of research methods used in literature review-based theses in health sciences

Muharrem YILMAZ

Kristiania University College, Norway

Introduction

It is important to develop skills to search and critically review scientific literature for health students since the health science literature is growing enormously and evidence-based knowledge is essential in students’ future occupational profession. Therefore, there is a need for further research in the development of search strategies in literature-based work within health programs.

The School of Health Sciences (ScHS) at Kristiania University College consists of the two institutions; Public Health & Training and Psychology, Pedagogy & Law. It offers research-based education at both bachelor's and master's level in addition to several further education programmes, subjects including Applied psychology, Pedagogy, Biomedicine, Physical activity and nutrition, Health and sports management, Lifestyle change and public health, Osteopathy, Training and coaching.

In the ScHS students are required to choose one research method for their Bachelor (BA) thesis from a variety of options i.e., qualitative, quantitative, case study or literature study (LS).

In the recent years, GDPR rules provides strict consideration to privacy. As a result, data collection has become challenging. Students now mostly prefer literature study to other complex research methodologies. This methodology is popular among health researchers, yet it is new for BA students in the School of Health Sciences.

The library offers a 3-hour course in information literacy and provides induvial guidance to support them.

Understanding their information seeking patterns will help the library to provide suitable support.

Aim

The purpose of the study is to identify the information seeking patterns for undergraduate students undertaking a literature review based thesis.

RQ1: How did the students select the databases for the literature review?
RQ2: How did the students justify their methods for doing literature searches?
RQ3: What criteria do students use to select a sample for their literature?

Method/ Program Description

This study is a qualitative review of the published thesis at the undergraduate level which analyzes a number of graduate theses in the ScHS at Kristiania University College.

A retrospective observational study was conducted to identify literature studies indexed in Kristiania Open Archive (KOA) from 2019 to 2021.

Results & Conclusion

The study shows that most theses were based on literature study as methodology between 2019 -2021 (17/27).

The findings demonstrate that research skills of students are adequate to implement literature studies. However, they should be enhanced. The support by librarians to students proved to be important. Systematic library-faculty collaboration for research methods courses is crucial and should be maintained. The action the library will consider is to integrate the Evidence Based Practice into the curriculum in ScHS, to give focus to literature study as method and develop services accordingly, to enhance hands on teaching interventions, workshops and supervision.

The result of this research will inform the development of an information literacy curriculum for educators and librarians targeted for this group. Further, it may create a cooperation with educators and health librarians at the undergraduate level in health sciences.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This research will create an effective dioalog and strong bridge between librarians and teachers for students knowlodge skills.



ID: 135 / Poster Presentations 1: 2
Poster
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

The Emtree term “diagnostic test accuracy study” retrieved less than half of the diagnostic accuracy studies in Embase

Pema Gurung1,2, Sahile Makineli2, René Spijker2, Mariska.M.G. Leeflang2

1Walaeus Library, Albinusdreef 2 2333 ZA Leiden 071 526 38 90; 2Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam Public Health, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Introduction
Embase is a biomedical and pharmacological bibliographic database of published literature, produced by Elsevier. In 2011, Embase introduced the Emtree term “diagnostic test accuracy study,” after discussion with the diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) community of Cochrane.
Aim
The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of this Emtree term when used to retrieve diagnostic accuracy studies.
Method/ Program Description
We first piloted a random selection of 1,000 titles from Embase and then repeated the process with 1,223 studies specifically limited to humans. Two researchers independently screened those for eligibility. From titles that were indicated as being relevant or potentially relevant by at least one assessor, the full texts were retrieved and screened. A third researcher retrieved the Emtree terms for each title and checked whether "diagnostic test accuracy study" was one of the attached Emtree terms. The results of both exercises were then cross-classified, and sensitivity and specificity of the Emtree term were estimated.
Results/ Evaluation
Our pilot set consisted of 1,000 studies, of which 20 (2.0%) were studies from which DTA data could be extracted. Thirteen studies had the label DTA study, of which five were indeed DTA studies. The final set consisted of 1,223 studies, of which 33 (2.7%) were DTA studies. Twenty studies were labeled as DTA study, of which fourteen indeed were DTA studies. This resulted in a sensitivity of 42.4% (95% CI: 25.5% to 60.8%) and a specificity of 99.5% (95% CI: 98.9% to 99.8%).
Conclusion

Although we planned to include a more focused set of studies in our second attempt, the percentage of DTA studies was similar in both attempts. The DTA label failed to retrieve most of the DTA studies and 30% of the studies labeled as being DTA study were in fact not DTA studies. The Emtree term DTA study does not meet the requirements to be useful for retrieving DTA studies accurately.

Human Touch (Recommended)

"your beliefs become your thoughts"

"your thoughts become your words"

"your words become your actions"

"your actions become your habits"

"your habits become your value"

"your value become your distiny"

Biography and Bibliography
I am from Nepal.
I have done my bachelor in health sciences at VU Amsterdam and i have done a master in global health at Maastricht University.
I have a few years of research background.
Now I am working as a medical information specialist at Leiden University.


ID: 129 / Poster Presentations 1: 3
Poster
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Turning student assignments into publications: Benefits for students and librarians

Heather MacDonald

Carleton University, Canada

Introduction

As the Health and Biosciences Librarian at <our country> , introducing graduate Health Science students to evidence synthesis is a significant part of information literacy training. Last year during the winter 2021 semester I collaborated with a faculty member on a student assignment that involved conducting evidence synthesis.

Aim

The faculty member approached me with the suggestion to have small groups conduct rapid scoping reviews with the option to publish the review after the assignment was completed. Her rationale was a TED talk entitled Don’t Waste Student Work – making student assignments valuable beyond the classroom.

Method/ Program Description

My contribution involved vetting the topics to make sure the amount of literature was manageable. I made recommendations on how to narrow/broaden certain topics to make them feasible in a 4-month timeframe. At the beginning of the semester each group met with me to get an initial search started and receive an overview of the scoping review process. I checked the group searches during the semester and met with some of the groups about the data extraction phase as well.

Results/ Evaluation

Because of my involvement in the process the faculty member offered authorship on any publications. Two of four groups opted to publish. The professor, teaching assistant and I met with both groups during the summer to discuss publication options. The students wrote draft publications and the three of us proofread and edited the publications. My focus was predominantly on the methods section.

Conclusion

This was a unique way, as a librarian, to participate in the classroom, but also to publish. Critical to the success was a solid relationship with the faculty member, established over the course of several years of teaching. Also essential was adequate time to review topics before the semester. Meeting students during the semester is a standard part of my role, but summer meetings and time to proofread and edit was required for this project as well.

Human Touch (Recommended)

For the students this was an excellent opportunity to make their assignment count beyond the classroom. Participating in the projects allowed me to see the final product the students produced, not something I always get to see, and to gain authorship.

Biography and Bibliography
Heather MacDonald has a background in biology and health. After working for 15 years in research laboratories, she switched gears completing her MLIS in 2010. She worked at University of Ottawa before arriving at Carleton University. Heather also works with the Knowledge Translation program at St Mikes Hospital.

Research Interests
Heather's research interests include the application of knowledge synthesis methodologies in different disciplines, active learning using systematic reviews, research data management and data sharing.


ID: 137 / Poster Presentations 1: 4
Poster
Topics: Professionals Connected

Health librarians: what’s so important about professional library associations?

Mary Dunne

Health Research Board, Ireland

Introduction

Professional library associations bring together information professionals who share interest in a subject, type of service, or geographical location. Their role in controlling entry, setting standards, and representing the interests of our profession means they have an impact on everyone involved in library and information services. It is important, therefore, that associations remain relevant and of value to our profession.

Aim

As a specialist group of the Library Association of Ireland, the Health Sciences Libraries Group (HSLG) aims to represent the professional needs of health librarians in Ireland. The committee, who guide the group’s direction and service provision, wanted to hear our members’ views on membership and to understand their expectations and priorities.

Method

In November 2021 we conducted an anonymous online survey of group members. To gain insight from a diverse cohort, we also invited other librarians based in Ireland, including those who were not members of a library association, to participate. We sent a survey link to our membership list, our email discussion list, the association’s e-newsletter, and via Twitter. The survey allowed skip logic so respondents could answer questions of relevance to them.

Results

We received 49 valid completed surveys. There were 21 responses from group members, giving a response rate of 46% for our group. The remaining 28 responses were from other members of the national association or another professional library association (21), former association members (6) and one person who had never joined an association. Although numbers are small, responses provide a useful guide to what is wanted and needed. For HSLG respondents, 95% agreed or strongly agreed that group membership was important for, and had improved, their practice; that the group fulfilled their expectations, and offered sufficient opportunities to contribute. All members agreed or strongly agreed that the HSLG provides community support. We also learned about the reasons librarians join library associations, and their valuable role in providing continuing professional development, progressing the interests of our profession, and supporting collegiality by connecting us as a community.

Conclusion

The responses from our survey provide a strong indication of priorities and will guide the direction and future services of the HSLG. Our findings will be of interest to those working on the governing bodies of library associations and groups. They are also relevant to members of these organisations who may wish to reflect on the benefits of membership and how they can communicate their needs to those making decisions on their behalf.

Human Touch

Our survey revealed the importance of belonging to a professional group which can provide tangible support but also a network of colleagues with whom we can engage, share and collaborate. In times when we are more isolated at work, we should all have access to a strong professional community.

Biography and Bibliography
Mary Dunne is a Chartered Information Specialist working in the HRB National Drugs Library, Dublin. Mary is Vice Chair and Research Officer of the Health Sciences Libraries Group of the Library Association of Ireland. Mary’s qualifications include a Masters in Psychology and a Masters in Information and Library Studies (Distinction). She was elected to the Register of Chartered Members of CILIP in 2015 and Register of Associate Members of the LAI in 2016. She has presented at numerous conferences, and authored articles for library and drug-related publications.

Some recent publications:
• Motorways to boreens: the story of the Irish Health Sciences Libraries Group virtual journal club, Journal of Health Information and Libraries Australasia, 2021, 2(3) https://doi.org/10.55999/johila.v2i3.88
• Health Research Board information specialists: adapting our practice to meet stakeholder needs duing a pandemic, An Leabharlann, Issue 1, 2021 https://www.libraryassociation.ie/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/An_Leabharlann_30-1_Full.pdf
• Enhancing social capital in our stakeholder networks, Insights: the UKSG journal. DOI: http://doi.org/10.1629/uksg.530
• Poster presentation: The HRB national drugs library: breaking boundaries by bridging and bonding, Jul 9, 2019, BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine https://ebm.bmj.com/content/24/Suppl_1/A46.1
• Regular contributor to the HSLG newsletter HINT (Health Information News & Thinking) https://hslg.ie/hint/


ID: 207 / Poster Presentations 1: 5
Poster
Topics: Professionals Connected

Information services and COVID-19 pandemics : 20 months later...

Patrice X. Chalon, Luc Hourlay, Nicolas Fairon

KCE, Belgium

Introduction
In March 2020, Belgium was subject to a containment measure in order to stop the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in its territory. Permanent teleworking for all staff was imposed, at the risk of impacting the continuity of services, including the library and information retrieval services. While the limitations on access to scientific research results have generally been exacerbated by this confinement, in the case of the KCE, the usual library services were ultimately only marginally affected. However, new services were requested to help researchers identify resources needed for their work.
Aim
To describe the situation 20 months after the containment measures. To evaluate changes in library services, specific COVID-19 services that were implemented on an emergency basis, and the impact on information retrieval procedures.
Method
The experiences of librarian and information specialists were summarized. The Long COVID example is used to illustrate the changes in procedures.
Results
Twenty months after the onset of the pandemic, working from home is still the rule for all KCE employees; therefore, the “temporary” adaptations to library services are still in place. COVID-19 specific services have been discontinued; international resources, such as the WHO COVID-19 Database, have been prioritized. Preprints are now a “standard” source of information for emerging or rapidly changing topics such as COVID-19; tools and procedures have been updated accordingly.
Conclusion

Since the beginning of the pandemic, KCE librarian and information specialists succeeded into delivering the usual services to their users: researchers could access all sources of information (bibliographical databases, journal articles and books) and conduct their research “as usual”. The lessons learned were integrated into the standard working method, to the benefit of the delivered advices and recommendations to decision makers. Adversity does not kill librarians, it makes them stronger!

Human Touch (Recommended)

Biography and Bibliography
Chalon PX, Hourlay L, Fairon N. La continuité des services dans le contexte de la pandémie covid-19 : retour d’expérience du KCE. Cahiers de la documentation - Bladen voor Documentatie. 2020;3-4(décembre 2020):66-72. [Journal article]
 
1:00pm - 2:00pmSIG - Public Health Information Group
Location: Van Beuningen
Session Chair: Mala Mann
1:00pm - 2:00pmVendor Workshops
Location: Schadee

13:00-13:30 Ingressus : Find, notifiy and connect. Rody Jordens 

13:30-13:40 Clarivate : The introduction to Clarivate's life sciences (Health Care) information  Koen Severijns - Global Head of Solutions and Sales Enablement

13:40-13:50 EBSCO: Using EBSCO to transfer knowledge to clinical practice. Claire Honeybourne - Director of Sales

2:00pm - 3:15pm2.1: Oral Presentations - Information Retrieval (1)
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Regina Küfner Lein
 
2:00pm - 2:15pm
ID: 130 / 2.1: 1
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

The impact of using search filters for non-randomised studies on rapid reviews

Irma Klerings, Anna Glechner, Martin Fangmeyer

Danube University Krems, Austria

Introduction

Study selection is one of the major time-consuming tasks in the evidence synthesis process because of the necessity to screen large search results. Therefore, reducing the number or records retrieved is an important way to save time when conducting rapid reviews (RRs). The recently published MEDLINE search filters by Waffenschmidt et al.1 are a promising way to reduce search results when searching for non-randomised controlled studies (cNRS). While they are less sensitive than comparable filters for randomized controlled studies, it is unclear if missed studies would affect review conclusions.
Aim

Based on RR searches that used no study type filters and included cNRS, we retrospectively examined the impact of using the cNRS-filters for Ovid MEDLINE.

We analysed:

  1. The proportion of cNRS included in the reviews that would still be found by the MEDLINE search when the Waffenschmidt filters (sensitivity or specificity focused) are applied,
  2. The reduction in study selection workload due to a smaller search result,
  3. Whether missed studies would have been retrieved by non-Boolean searches,
  4. The impact of missing studies on the conclusions of the original review.

Method

We screened RRs completed at our institution between 2018 and 2021, identifying those that included cNRS and applied no study type filters. For each eligible RR, we identified which cNRS had been found by the original MEDLINE search, and if they would still be found when the search filters were applied. We then checked the reduction of the records retrieved and calculated the potential reduction in screening time. We also checked if missed references would have been found by reference list screening and PubMed similar articles searches used in the original RR. Finally, we are currently assessing if missed studies would have changed the conclusions of the RR.
Results

These are preliminary results; the final analysis will be completed in early 2022.

21 RRs fit our inclusion criteria and included 64 cNRS. The best sensitivity filter (Fsens) retrieved all included studies in 14 reviews, compared to 8 reviews with the best specificity filter (Fspec). Fsens lead to an average reduction of 43% (21%-75%) in retrieved records, Fspec to 56% (39-84%). This represents an average reduction in screening time of 3 hours per reviewer when using Fsens and 4 hours for Fspec. Of 8 studies missed by Fsens, 5 were found by the non-Boolean searches. Fspec missed 17 studies, 10 were found by non-Boolean searches. Using Fspec would have lead to no conclusion being possible in 2 RRs.

Conclusion

Based on preliminary results, using Fsens would reduce screening time without negatively impacting RR conclusions. Additionally, non-Boolean methods were able to retrieve more than half of the studies missed by each filter.

Human Touch

Our rapid review services provide hospital personnel with timely and concise evidence syntheses. By improving our workflows, we aim to provide better support for them.

Reference: 1 Waffenschmidt, et al. Development and validation of study filters for identifying controlled non-randomized studies in PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE. Res Syn Meth. 2020; 11: 617– 626.

Biography and Bibliography
Irma Klerings works as information specialist for the Department for Evidence-based Medicine and Evaluation and Cochrane Austria at Danube University Krems, Austria. She is also an information specialist for the Cochrane Public Health Group. Her main roles are developing search strategies for systematic and rapid reviews, assessing search strategies, and teaching systematic search methods. She also contributes to methods studies in the field of evidence synthesis.

Nussbaumer-Streit, B., Ellen, M., Klerings, I., Sfetcu, R., Riva, N., Mahmić-Kaknjo, M., ... & Gartlehner, G. (2021). Resource use during systematic review production varies widely: a scoping review. Journal of clinical epidemiology, 139, 287-296.
Nussbaumer-Streit, B., Klerings, I., Wagner, G., Heise, T. L., Dobrescu, A. I., Armijo-Olivo, S., ... & Gartlehner, G. (2018). Abbreviated literature searches were viable alternatives to comprehensive searches: a meta-epidemiological study. Journal of clinical epidemiology, 102, 1-11.


2:15pm - 2:30pm
ID: 223 / 2.1: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Developing searchRxiv: An international transdisciplinary repository for search strategies

Neal Haddaway2, Melissa L. Rethlefsen1, Cristina Ashby3

1University of New Mexico Health Sciences Library & Informatics Center, United States of America; 2Stockholm Environment Institute; 3CABI

Introduction
Documenting, saving, and sharing search strategies is an important component of transparent reporting for systematic reviews. It is also helpful for individual practice, enabling valuable search “blocks” on a myriad of topics to be shared, modified, and reused. Though documentation and sharing are critical, these activities have been scattered across dozens of resources, from individual journal supplemental files to, rarely, institutional repositories. Shared search block resources that have been developed previously have never been adopted broadly; successful platforms for documentation and sharing have been local.
Aim
We sought to develop a transdisciplinary platform to share search strategies and their documentation.
Method/ Program Description
We collaborated with CABI to develop searchRxiv, a new subject agnostic platform for documenting and sharing search strategies. Initial conversations led to the development of a proposal for a standardised file type for documenting systematic searches, which outlined the key background issues shaping the platform, including the current state of poor reporting quality of search strategies, the need for librarians to receive credit for their intellectual contributions, and a lack of accessibility to search strategies as a contributor to research waste. We proposed creating a platform which would: improve accuracy of search strategy documentation, create citable records for each search strategy, and be openly available to improve accessibility. We established an Advisory Group to provide feedback on the proposal, data elements, and standards required for maximum benefit and reproducibility. 27 data elements were proposed after review by the Advisory Group.
Results/ Evaluation
Using the initial proposal, plus the data elements and standards proposed by the core group and the Advisory Group, CABI developed searchRxiv (searcharxiv.org) in mid-2021, built on CABI's existing technology infrastructure. searchRxiv enables individuals to create a DOI-stamped record of a search strategy or a search block. Fields captured include title, the search strategy, the date of the search, update dates, the review question, a description, keywords, validation information, whether the search was peer reviewed, links to publications, and database details.
Conclusion

searchRxiv remains in active development as feedback from the user community is received. Long-term, the vision for searchRxiv is to connect it to major search platforms to enable automatic uploading to searchRxiv to improve documentation.
Human Touch (Recommended)



2:30pm - 2:45pm
ID: 174 / 2.1: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Information specialists : guardians of scientific output of their institute

Wichor Bramer

Erasmus MC, Netherlands, The

Introduction
Researchers from many institutes, both academic and non-academix perform and publish systematic reviews. Many of these institutes have a medical library that offers SR services to their researchers. Sometimes researchers seek assistance but cannot find it, or they fail to seek assistance, yet they will still pursue their review. Thus, many systematic reviews are published without assistance of a medical librarian.
Aim
Our aim is to investigate barriers to using assistance from a medical library, and to develop ideas how we can improve the percentage of SRs that are assisted by medical libraries.
Method
We surveyed corresponding authors of systematic reviews from researchers from university hospitals. We asked them whether or not they had used assistance from a search specialist. If they had not used assistance we asked further for the reasons and barriers for not asking for assistance. We surveyed medical librarians from university hospitals about the percentage of SR projects in their institute that they serve. We will investigate the barriers to serving all requests.
Results/ Evaluation
The involvement of information specialists in Systematic review varies substantially. In some organizations 100% of all searches for systematic reviews are developed by information specialists, while in other organizations almost no review is assisted by the library. The most important limiting factor for information specialists is not having enough capacity to do all searches. In many cases researchers are not aware of the option to ask an information specialist for help, or the researchers think they have enough skills to do the searches themselves. The vast majority of information specialists think it is very important that information specialists are involved in systematic reviews prior to publication.

Almost half of the responding systematic review authors have never used a librarian for their systematic reviews. Many are unaware the information specialists can assist them with searches. Many organizations do not have a medical library, or the library does not offer assistence with searches. Systematic review authors are much less convinced of the need of involving an information specialist in systematic reviews that information specilists do.
Conclusion

At our institute we assist 90% of the systematic reviews, thus improving the scientific quality of the publications. However, when we are asked to do peer review of systematic reviews we see SRs from university employees based on inferieor searches that have been developed without the assistance of a librarian. The aim of our research is to inspire medical librarians to become guardians of their organization's systematic review output either by offering peer review of researchers developed searches, or by offering librarian-mediated searches. That way each SR project should be based on a high quality search from the start of the project.

Human Touch (Recommended)

We hope to inspire the audience to reach out to their researchers and offer those working on systematic reviews their help. This will increase the overall quality of published systematic reviews and thus of the treatments that are based on them.



2:45pm - 3:00pm
ID: 161 / 2.1: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Search Summary Table results for an evidence gap map

Alison Bethel, Naomi Shaw

University of Exeter, United Kingdom

Introduction

Search Summary Tables (SSTs) offer a simple way to provide an overview of the results of the searches in evidence syntheses. It combines the details from the PRISMA flow diagram with the search methods including sensitivity and precision calculations for each database, and overall. They can be used as evidence to inform future searching for the individual information professional and, if published with the systematic review/map, for the wider evidence syntheses community.

Previous SST have only been published for systematic reviews, this project will create a SST for an evidence gap map.

Aim

Create search summary tables (SSTs) for the different types of study: systematic review (SR), randomised controlled trial (RCT) and economic evaluation from an evidence gap map on peer support interventions. This is to help understand where the evidence was found for each study type and whether supplementary search techniques found any additional relevant studies.

Method/ Program Description

The searches for the Srs were run first followed by the searches for RCTs and finally the economic evaluations. The supplementary searching was all undertaken at the same time. Once the evidence gap map had been completed, the included references for each study type was input into the SST. The EndNote libraries with all of the search results (ie before duplicates were removed) were searched to find out which search in which database picked up the reference. This was carried out for all three study types.

Results/ Evaluation

The results presented will include: what database combinations would have found all of the included references, which database searches found unique references, which supplementary search methods found included references and which searches did not pick up included references which were in the database; and why.

Any results about the differences between searching for SRs, RCTs and EEs will also be presented.

Conclusion

Completing a SST can take time but it is a great learning tool for the information professional (IP) working on the project as it encourages reflection and learning, it also encourages transparency, not just of the search methods but of the search results, and provides evidence for the decisions we make as IPs. This is the first SST produced for an evidence gap map in the subject area of health and we are expecting that it will evolve into a living map and we will continue to complete SSTs to discover whether the search patterns stay the same over time.

Human Touch (Recommended)

We think SSTs are a great way for IPs to reflect on their work and share knowledge with others

Biography and Bibliography
I have over 10 years’ experience in developing and running searches for all types of evidence syntheses including systematic reviews and maps, rapid reviews and realist reviews as well as evidence briefings. Along with my colleagues, I provide advice and training to colleagues, students and clinicians on how to search.Prior to that I worked in both Government and research libraries.


3:00pm - 3:15pm
ID: 169 / 2.1: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Use and benefit of citation tracking techniques in evidence synthesis: a scoping review

Christian Appenzeller-Herzog1, Julian Hirt2,3,4, Thomas Nordhausen3, Hannah Ewald1

1University Medical Library, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 2Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital Basel, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 3International Graduate Academy, Institute for Health and Nursing Science, Medical Faculty, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany; 4Institute of Applied Nursing Science, Department of Health, Eastern Switzerland University of Applied Sciences (formerly FHS St.Gallen), St.Gallen, Switzerland

Introduction
Citation tracking techniques can be used as supplementary search methods in systematic reviews. They aim at collecting cited and citing references from pertinent references that are already known. Evidence-based recommendations on how and when to optimally use citation tracking are needed to guide systematic review workflows.
Aim
This scoping review maps the benefit of citation tracking in systematic literature searching for health-related topics (1).
Method/ Program Description
Methodological studies on evidence retrieval by citation tracking in health-related systematic literature searching with no restrictions on study design, language, and publication date were eligible. We searched MEDLINE, Web of Science Core Collection, CINAHL, LLISFT, and LISTA. Additionally, we performed web searching via Google Scholar as well as backward and forward citation tracking of included studies using Google Scholar, Scopus, and Web of Science. Experts were contacted for additional eligible studies. Two reviewers independently assessed reference eligibility. Data extraction and analysis were performed by one reviewer and double-checked by another.
Results/ Evaluation
We identified 47 eligible studies that were published between 1985 and 2021. Studies came mostly from the UK (n=17, 37%) or the US (n=15, 33%). The aims of the studies were to assess (i) benefit or effectiveness of citation tracking (e.g., number and proportion of studies included in a systematic review uniquely via citation tracking), (ii) technical applications of citation tracking (e.g., using Web of Science vs. Google Scholar), and (iii) to compare different citation tracking methods (e.g., direct vs. indirect citation tracking), or a combination thereof. Full scoping review results will be available in early 2022.
Conclusion

The preliminary results show that almost 50 studies published in the last 36 years assessed citation tracking for health-related evidence retrieval. The full results of this scoping review will inform an international online Delphi study aiming at the development of recommendations for citation tracking in systematic literature searching (1). For example, we hope to derive guidance as to when which citation tracking technique is likely to be particularly effective and how it should be conducted.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Biography and Bibliography
1. Hirt J, Nordhausen T, Appenzeller-Herzog C, Ewald H. Using citation tracking for systematic literature searching - study protocol for a scoping review of methodological studies and a Delphi study [version 3; peer review: 2 approved]. F1000Res 2021; 9:1386.
 
2:00pm - 3:15pm2.2: Workshop Education
Location: Schadee
 
ID: 166 / 2.2: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Education

Open Educational Resources in the spotlight

Irma van Houts1, Sietske Vergeer2

1HAN, Netherlands, The; 2HAN, Netherlands, The

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm2.3: Workshop Resources and Metrics
Location: Zeelenberg
 
ID: 171 / 2.3: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Resources and metrics

The benefits of a well-managed Current Research Information System (CRIS) and the role the library can play within an academic hospital

Robin F. Ottjes, Peter G. Braun

Central Medical Library, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands

Biography and Bibliography
Robin and Peter are both Medical Information Specialists at the Central Medical Library of the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG). Next to education support and systematic reviews, they both support research in the UMCG by providing support for a wide selection of topics, such as: Open Access, repository help, research impact & assessment, profiles and identifiers and reference management.
 
3:15pm - 3:45pmCoffee Break
Location: Willem Burgerfoyer
3:45pm - 5:00pmP2: Plenary Speakers - Guus van den Brekel & Jasmin Schmitz
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Eugenie Delvaux
Session Chair: Winnie Schats
 
ID: 1238 / P2: 1
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Into the User Environment 2022!

Guus van den Brekel

University Medical Center Groningen, Netherlands, The

« Into the User Environment Now!» was the title of my first plenary presentation at an EAHIL conference.

It pictured how -back in 2006- how users and the information landscape changed rapidly, and what we needed to do about it as medical libraries, to keep up the pace, to not loose the connection with the user.

Technologies to embrace, actions to take…

This update pictures where things went right, wrong or very different! And it discusses where we are now in 2022, with a peek into possible futures, from the perspective of a medical library in a Dutch academic hospital, facilitating patient care, education ánd research support.

Biography and Bibliography
Guus van den Brekel is medical information specialist at the Central Medical Library of the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG), in north of the Netherlands. His work includes developing, maintaining of library services and tools for staff and students, as well as innovation. As such he is also the ‘go-between’ for the IT-departments regarding library systems and services. Research Impact and Support is his major focus currently. He is coordinator for the UMCG’s current research information system (PURE). In general, he is always on the lookout for tools & services that make the workflow of hospital staff, researchers, teachers and students easier and more efficient.


ID: 1239 / P2: 2
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Data

Scientific misconduct in the medical and health sciences and means to avoid it (at least partially)

Jasmin Schmitz

ZB MED - Information Centre for Life Sciences, Germany

Scientific misconduct and good scientific practices/research integrity are two sides of the same coin. Especially in the medical and health sciences misconduct can cause severe damage. Therefore, if errors are spotted publications should be corrected or retracted.

Scientific misconduct can either be performed deliberately or by mistake or rather lack of knowledge.

Besides a general introduction to the topic, the talk will also give an overview on practices and tools that can help to reduce at least such forms of misconduct that happened unintentionally.

Biography and Bibliography
Jasmin Schmitz received a PhD in information science. She worked as a freelance trainer for a commercial provider for scientific information and as scientific project coordinator in the field of bibliometrics. At ZB MED she is responsible for the publication advisory services.
 
5:00pm - 6:00pmSIG - European Veterinary Libraries Group
Location: Van Beuningen
Session Chair: Fiona Brown
6:00pm - 7:30pmWelcome Reception
Location: City Hall (external location)

We will be welcomed to Rotterdam by one of the aldermen of the city of Rotterdam, and will enjoy a musical intermezzo.

Date: Thursday, 02/June/2022
9:00am - 10:00amPanel discussion - The Future of Systematic Reviews
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Louise Farragher

Melissa Rethlefsen | Jos Kleijnen | Maria-Inti Metzendorf | Wichor Bramer | Chair: Louise Farragher 

10:00am - 10:30amCoffee Break
Location: Willem Burgerfoyer
10:30am - 12:15pm3.1: Oral Presentations - Professionals Connected
Location: Van Beuningen
Session Chair: Hans Ket
 
10:30am - 10:45am
ID: 155 / 3.1: 1
Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Collaboration between the librarian and researchers

Eli Harriss1, Sabine Klein2

1University of Oxford, United Kingdom; 2University of Zurich, Switzerland

Introduction

We want to discuss the holistic, ‘total’ nature of what can happen when a librarian works with researchers to collaborate on a project such a systematic review. We use the ‘total’ model to consider the breadth of skills required by library staff: project management; people management; time management; communication; teaching; and information literacy. We describe the practical steps that we can take when conducting the reference interview and an algorithm that we can use, the mentoring aspect involved in these relationships, and the “invisible work” (with reference to Ross-White, 2021) and emotional labour put in by library staff (with reference to Constantin, 1840 and Emmelhainz et al, 2017) to ensure that projects are successful, methodologies are rigorous, robust, and transparent, and that all communication is positive to maintain future collaboration.
Aim

Two case studies are presented to compare the practical steps we take when a librarian approaches a research group, or when researchers approach the librarian to request their involvement in a project such as a systematic, scoping, or realist review; the pastoral care and mentoring aspects involved in managing the information science aspects of a review project; the emotional labour and the behavioural aspects of meetings with students and researchers for 1-1s to discuss research projects.
Method/ Program Description

Case studies from Medical Librarians based at the University of Oxford and the University of Zurich are used as the research method for this presentation.
Results/ Evaluation

We present an algorithm of steps to follow in the reference interview, and describe the mentoring skills and the emotional labour involved in two cases.

Conclusion

These case studies reveal that, in line with the literature, the practical steps involved in the reference interview, the mentoring and pastoral care of students and researchers, and the emotional labour are not unique to the work of Medical Librarians, setting our work in the broader context of librarianship, and raising awareness of these issues both for further training and for professional welfare. We also encourage our fellow librarians to discuss more about how to deal with demanding researchers and how to set boundaries in a professional way.

References

Constantin, L. A. Bibliothekonomie : oder Lehre von der Anordnung, Bewahrung und Verwaltung der Bibliotheken. Leipzig: N.p., 1840.

Emmelhainz, C., Pappas, E. & Seale, M. 2017. Behavioral expectations for the mommy librarian: the successful reference transaction as emotional labor, Sacramento, CA, Library Juice Press.

Ross-White, A. 2021. Search is a verb: systematic review searching as invisible labor. J Med Libr Assoc, 109, 505-506.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This paper is very much focussing on the human touch involved when Librarians collaborate with Researchers, discussing the emotional labour and the interpersonal skills required for this work.

Biography and Bibliography
Eli Harriss has worked as an Outreach Librarian and Library Manager for thirteen years and is now the Outreach and Enquiry Services Manager for the Bodleian Health Care Libraries at the University of Oxford (UK).

Sabine Klein is a former medical subject librarian and newly appointed product manager at the Zurich University Library. She strives to improve products and customer services.


10:45am - 11:00am
ID: 231 / 3.1: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

The power of community: how experience, expertise, and friendship strengthened academic pandemic support

Heather K Moberly1, Fiona JL Brown2, Emma Place3

1Texas A&M University, United States of America; 2University of Edinburgh, Scotland; 3University of Bristol, England

Introduction

Veterinary librarianship is a small specialty. Practitioners are often the only specialist at their university or in their geographic area. Historically, they have formed tightknit communities within larger library organizations including the European Veterinary Libraries Group in EAHIL, the Animal Health Information Interest Group in USAIN, and the Animal and Veterinary Information Specialist Caucus in MLA.

Aim

This case study illustrates the challenges and responses of three librarians and their libraries to support their academic programs across two and a half years during the global pandemic. The three share similar responsibilities at large comprehensive universities and have both discussed their individual work and collaborated across roughly a decade.

Method/ Program Description

Etienne Wenger defined Communities of Practice (COPs) as groups of individuals who share an interest, the desire to learn from each other, and the desire to improve the shared interest. COPs can be formed naturally or intentionally. (Wenger, 1998). Throughout the years, each of the three has led at times and learned at others.

This session shares overviews of each librarian's experience individually and focuses on the shared experience of relying on the strength of community built in years immediately prior through collaboration.

Results/ Evaluation

Upon reflection, the three librarians recognized that they, and their colleagues, form a Community of Practice that transcends membership in specific organizations and includes specialists in adjacent disciplines.

Conclusion

The actions and reactions of three similarly tasked librarians during the ongoing, several years long work response during the pandemic led them to realize that throughout the time they had known each other that they had created a Community of Practice and appreciate its strength.

Biography and Bibliography
Heather K. Moberly, Fiona J.L. Brown, and Emma Place are academic support information specialists who share an interest in, and support of, the veterinary curricula at their respective universities. They are the current officers of the European Veterinary Libraries Group in EAHIL and recently collaborated on the "Acquire" module of the open access online tutorial EBVM Learning (ebvmlearning.org).


11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 205 / 3.1: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

RIB, the Italian Repository of the Health Libraries and Information Professionals, an Omeka S Digital interactive platform

Ivana Truccolo1, Francesca Gualtieri1, Fabio Venuda3, Sara Speciani2, Silvia Molinari1, Maria Rosaria Orditura3, Chiara Formigoni1, Federica Viazzi1, Fulvia Merlini1, Ferruccio Diozzi4

1GIDIF RBM, Italy; 2Editrice Bibliografica, Milano; 3Università Statale di Milano; 4Cira Documentation Centre, Napoli (former head)

Introduction
There exists a substantial body of scientific literature on topics related to health libraries and the
role of the health librarian & information professional (HeLiP).
In Italy, despite the fact that the provision of professional training, continuing education, and
cultural and scientific updating of health professionals is, according to the law through which it was
founded, one of the aims of the National Health Service (Servizio Sanitario Nazionale, SSN),
neither libraries nor information centres are specifically mentioned and the HeLIP is not formally a
professional role within NHS.
Aim
The aim was to create a repository, or interactive digital platform, to highlight the role of
HeLIPs and the work done by health libraries and information centres, which collect documents,
projects, images, videos, web pages...
This repository stems from a project originally developed by a member of the association Gidif-
Rbm during a master’s course in digital humanities (University of Milan, coordinator Prof. Fabio
Venuda), a project that the association subsequently decided to implement
The platform’s potential target comprises not just students, healthcare professionals and librarians,
but also teachers/instructors and any members of the general public who may be interested.
Materials and methods
The prototype for the platform was created between October 2020 and January 2021 using
Omeka Classic, a free, open-source content management system for online digital collections
developed by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. It was chosen for its relative
user friendliness and because it offers the possibility of exporting and reusing the data by creating a
dedicated website: https://itbdm2021.omeka.net/.
To date, 99 articles have been published, grouped into the platform’s six sections:
1. John Shaw Billings and the birth of biomedical librarianship
2. Libraries and biomedical libraries: definitions
3. Cooperation in the biomedical field: professional associations, library systems, networking and
products
4. Continuous and specialised training of HeLIP
5. Biomedical and humanistic disciplines: possible intersections
6. Professions in the field of biomedical information & communication: an overview

Impact of the prototype
The prototype, promoted on social media, has been well received. Editrice Bibliografica (an Italian
publisher and cultural agency) has entered into a partnership with GIDIF-RBM to transform it into a
real interactive digital platform.

An innovative collaborative project was drawn up and presented at BIBLIOSTAR 2021, an annual
meeting, held in Milan (Italy), dedicated to the world of libraries.
Using Google Form a questionnaire was submitted to professionals in order to gather suggestions
and evaluate interest in the project. Of the 37 responders, 75% indicated that they interested in
taking part in the RIB project.
Having thus established that the project had the necessary prerequisites, a domain was purchased
(https://www.rib-gidif.org) and Omeka S, an advanced version of Omeka Classic, was installed.
Through collaboration with the second Master in Digital Humanities run by the University of
Milan, data were imported into Omeka S (via an application programming interface) and the
transition from prototype to real interactive digital platform is now under way.

Concluding remarks

We believe that this project has the potential to raise the profile of iHeLIP and could bring to light important documents that are often undervalued or not widely known.

Human Touch (Recommended)

People can easily contribute to the platform by proposing documents that the GIDF-RBM board will evaluate before publication.

Biography and Bibliography
ORCID 0000-0003-0402-5136
Master in Digital Humanities (2020). Master in Library and Information Science(1 yr after 4yrs of BA); BA(4yrs) in Sociology; Master in Health Sociology;
I entered the library profession in 1984 by organising and heading the Library of the Centro di Riferimento Oncologico di Aviano (CRO) IRCCS, northeast of Italy, one of the 9 Italian Cancer Research & Care Institutes in Italy. After 1998, the Library activated a section addressed to patients and their relatives and became the "CRO Scientific and Patients’ Library”. After 2010, the Library beam the pivotal of an institutional Patient Education & Empowerment Program. After April 1st 2020, I am retired. Until than , I have been actively involved in many Italian collaborative projects and inter-library IT networks.
Currently, I am the President of two different no-profit Associations: the GIDIF RBM, the Italian Association of Biomedical Information Professionals, and the ANGOLO OdV, an Italian Cancer Long Survivors Association.
Publications:
- Digital Humanities versus Medical Humanities http://www.bibliotecheoggi.it/rivista/article/view/1310
- The power of informal cancer caregivers’ writings: results from a thematic and narrative analysis. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-020-05901-3
- Priorities for Cancer Research From the Viewpoints of Cancer Nurses and Cancer Patients. DOI: 10.1097/ncc.0000000000000776
- Patients and caregivers’ unmet information needs in the field of patient education: results from an Italian multicenter exploratory survey. DOI: 10.1007/s00520-018-4439-z
- Avoiding misleading information: A study of complementary medicine online information for cancer patients DOI: DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2019.02.006


11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 114 / 3.1: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Coordinating and developing university library communications — my job, everybody's task

Tuulevi Ovaska

University of Eastern Finland, Finland

Introduction
The university library's communications were reorganized in early 2017. Earlier, first the deputy director, and later two of the library’s department heads together were responsible for the communications, but five years ago it was decided that a should take the position and expert role to first reorganize and then constantly develop the communications. At this point, it is necessary to explore and examine how the library’s communications have performed and developed.

Aim
The presentation seeks to explain how communication was reorganized, what tools were put into service, how communication competencies and tasks were shared among the library staff, how activities are continuously developed, and what being responsible for communications means for the professional development of a librarian.

Method

The presentation inspects the documents of communication related groups and meetings, explores the programs and results of communication themed library staff seminars and workshops, compares former and later communication plans, looks at communication related articles in the annual reports of the library. It also examines if and how the plans were realized and how much the new role changed the librarian's job description.

Results
Examining the documentation and the achievements related to the library’s communications during the years 2017-2021 reveal that the organizational changes were necessary and effective, and that library communications require constant development. In libraries, communicating about the services and collections is part of everyone’s job. In addition, this is one of the many cases when professional development is horizontal.

Conclusion

Library and information science professionals are often eager to expand their roles and usually interested in learning and professional development. Communicating about the library services and collections is essential and should part of the library’s strategy and be included in all staff members’ job descriptions at one level or another so that the users get the information they need when they need it. In addition, the person in charge of it, should be eager to learn, to facilitate learning and to generously share their knowledge.

Human Touch

People communicate with each other, even if they use a wide variety of technology. Communication is a human activity. I aim to present this case both as organizational development in the library and as five years of professional development and a personal learning process.

Biography and Bibliography
Tuulevi Ovaska, MA, Senior Information Specialist at the University of Eastern Finland Library, graduated from the University of Tampere, Finland, in 1990. She is librarian and information specialist since 1990 and health librarian and information specialists since 2003. Her main tasks are currently related to coordinating and developing library communications, but she also has subject librarian and researcher support tasks in medicine and dentistry. Tuulevi has been a member of the EAHIL Board until the end of the year 2020 and before that she was a Council member and a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of EAHIL. She is interested in cooperation and collaboration, in professional development, in benchmarking, in supporting researchers' visibility and research impact and in open and responsible metrics and evaluation. Her interests also include in the visibility and impact of library work, and the roles and tasks of library staff, and in how to communicate better about what we do (and what we don't do). Twitter:@TuuleviUEFLib. LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/tuulevi

Selected recent publications in Finnish and English:
Juntunen, A., Laurila, A., Ovaska, T., Rissanen, T., Rosti, T. (2021). Viestintä kuuluu kaikille - mielikuvien arkistointia. Ensimmäinen vuosikymmenemme: Itä-Suomen yliopiston vuosikertomus 2020. ['Communications Belong to Everyone – Archiving Mental Images'] Pandemic'] Mikko Meriläinen & Tuulevi Ovaska (eds.) Our First Decade. University of Eastern Finland – Annual Report 2020. University of Eastern Finland, Library, 2021. Publications of the University of Eastern Finland. General Series; 37. http://urn.fi/URN:ISBN:978-952-61-3783-4
Aho, M., Kuittinen, M., Meriläinen, M., Mikkonen, H., Ovaska, T., Parviainen, H., Rissanen, T., Rosti, T., Saarti, J., Salmi, K., Turunen, T. (2021). Kirjasto kiepsahti korona-aikaan. Ensimmäinen vuosikymmenemme: Itä-Suomen yliopiston vuosikertomus 2020. ['The Library during the Coronavirus Pandemic'] Mikko Meriläinen & Tuulevi Ovaska (eds.) Our First Decade. University of Eastern Finland – Annual Report 2020. University of Eastern Finland, Library, 2021. Publications of the University of Eastern Finland. General Series; 37. http://urn.fi/URN:ISBN:978-952-61-3783-4
Virrankoski, A., Ala-Kyyny, J., Manninen, S., Suikka, M., Aho, M., Kuittinen, M., Meriläinen, M., Mikkonen, H., Ovaska, T., Parviainen, H., Rissanen, T., Rosti, T., Saarti, J., Salmi, K., Turunen, T., Lahtinen, H., & Marjamaa, M. (2020). ”Nenästä kiinni ja ponnistus ja hyppy! Kirjastot sopeutuivat koronakevääseen. Signum, 52(2), 16–23. https://doi.org/10.25033/sig.96018 [An article in a professional journal about how Finnish academic libraries adapted to the covid19 situation in spring 2020]
Buset, K. J., Declève, G., & Ovaska, T. (2019). Hunting for the library value. Journal of EAHIL, 15(1), 8-14. https://doi.org/10.32384/jeahil15305


11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 143 / 3.1: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Implementing a national discovery service – partnership working to deliver at scale

Lucy Reid, Helen Bingham

Health Education England, United Kingdom

Introduction

Country A had a fragmented discovery infrastructure with local, regional and national platforms. As a result, user experience research showed that healthcare staff and learners had difficulty accessing and using knowledge and evidence. In 2018, approval was granted to develop a national resource discovery infrastructure:

“…to provide staff with a single, coherent national gateway to their trusted library and knowledge service, connecting them seamlessly to quality resources, services and support tailored to their needs”

Delivering a national discovery service is a step-change for the wider workforce and for knowledge and library staff.

Aim

Procurement and implementation of a national discovery service in a highly complex environment has required significant partnership working between a strategic national body, 182 local knowledge and library services, suppliers and other stakeholders. The aim of this presentation is to share learning from the experience of working in partnership to meet the needs of over 1 million end-users and show the impact of the work to date.

Method/ Program Description

Partnership working and project management have been key to the delivery of the new discovery service, the NHS Knowledge and Library Hub. This has been underpinned by regular research and engagement activities throughout the process. This presentation will show the importance of activities including:
• End-user experience research
• Before Action Review
• Stakeholder engagement events
• Product training and support
• Marketing and communication
• After Action Review
• User surveys

Results/ Evaluation

The NHS Knowledge and Library Hub was launched to library and knowledge services in October 2021 with national communications to end-users starting in January 2022. Feedback through After Action Reviews with stakeholders and partners shows that the implementation has been positive. Early indications from end-users suggest that the NHS Knowledge and Library Hub has improved access to knowledge and evidence for the wider workforce.

Conclusion

Implementing the NHS Knowledge and Library Hub has been beneficial for end-users as well as knowledge and library staff. Learning from the process will inform future developments including additional content integrations, enhancing single-sign-on and further tailoring the end-user experience.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This project has required an enhanced level of collaboration to manage change at pace and scale, especially in the context of the pandemic and other challenges. Members of the project team worked continuously with regional and personal networks to maintain dialogue with stakeholders and achieve buy-in. “Temperature checks” throughout the project showed that this engagement led to growing acceptance of the new service and ultimately better uptake.

Biography and Bibliography
Lucy Reid
Deputy Head of Knowledge and Library Services (Resource Discovery)
Health Education England
lucy.reid@hee.nhs.uk
Lucy is a healthcare information professional with a background in delivering information to students, clinicians and patients, supporting evidence-based practice, research and continuing professional development. She is interested in knowledge management and the development of culture, behaviour and systems to support this. The focus of her current role is digital resource discovery, but she also co-leads the COVID-19 workstream, supporting the learning and recovery of knowledge and library services through the pandemic.

Helen Bingham
Head of Knowledge and Library Services (Resource Discovery)
Health Education England
helen.bingham@hee.nhs.uk

Helen is Head of Knowledge and Library Services (Resource Discovery) at Health Education England she leads the resource discovery workstream of HEE’s Knowledge for Healthcare strategy. A qualified knowledge specialist, she has worked for the NHS for over 30 years in a wide range of library and technology enhanced learning roles.


11:45am - 12:00pm
ID: 157 / 3.1: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Health and well-being based on science and research: Building of the National Digital Library for Finnish social welfare and health care professionals

Paivi Ukkonen, Aila Ruokokoski

SOTEVirtuaalikirjasto, Finland

Introduction

We started the project in 2017 to explore new ways to provide information and e-resources for Finnish social welfare and health care professionals in 16 non-university central hospitals, health care districts and social welfare and health care municipalities.

The results of the 3-year project were a success. The National Digital Library, Helli, was opened in January 2020. It provides access and a platform to e-resources for users of all member organizations via helli.virtuaalikirjasto.fi

Fourteen project organizations established SOTEVirtuaalikirjasto, a non-profit corporation behind the library. SOTEVirtuaalikirjasto is a legal entity and was incorporated in November 2019.

Aim

The basic aims of SOTEVirtuaalikirjasto and the National Digital Library, Helli are:

To develop nationwide procurement and hospital library services
To provide clients (owners) with e-resources to maintain information and expertise and to promote quality of care and patient safety
To ensure equal access to the basic collection and international scientific information regardless of geographical location
To produce direct economic benefits and cost savings
To help increase the attractiveness of the workplace

Method/ Program Description

Project staff: 1–2 project employees

Project team: 10 members (library professionals and a doctor), 12 meetings

Project management team: 6 administrators of the hospital districts, 3 meetings

Corporation board: 5 members

Corporation staff: 2 employees

An optimized procurement of scientific resources

SOTEVirtuaalikirjasto is an official procurement unit for its owners. A new concept of procurement was brought into use by direct subscriptions and Pay Per View orders. The use of agents has been mostly abandoned. Joint licenses have brought remarkable savings.

The National Digital Library, Helli – a Personal Pocket eLibrary

The National Digital Library, Helli is built on the LibGuides platform. It utilizes the Ovid Discovery search portal, and remote access is provided by OpenAthens. Helli provides easy access to diverse, up-to-date international information for busy clinicians and professionals.

Results/ Evaluation

What is unique about this project is that it will continue to exist as a new national activity.

The project has created cost savings, better service and order management. The cost savings of joint acquisitions are 20–50 %.

The National Digital Library, Helli gives all organizations access to a common basic collection. Joint procurement has increased the number of titles up to 17,000. Before the project, the smallest hospital collections included just 30–50 titles; the larger ones had 150–10,000 titles.

Services will be evaluated for the first time in February 2022 by the end users.

Conclusion

Our project is exceptional evidence of trust and collaboration between hospital libraries.

Managing a project with limited resources needed a clear vision, a strong state of mind and patience from all partners. Professional skills and knowledge of the medical publishing business were essential.

The major prerequisite for success was the support and commitment of the highest administrators of the hospital districts to the project and its goals.

Cooperation with library professionals with strong experience working in a hospital environment was also important.

Human Touch (Recommended)

 
10:30am - 12:15pm3.2: Oral Presentations - Education (1)
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Jolanda Elmers
 
10:30am - 10:45am
ID: 113 / 3.2: 1
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

“An expression we used was ‘playing each other well’’ Bachelor Students at the Department of Social Work and their experiences of suitable collaborative learning face-to-face on Campus: A qualitative study

Hilde Kaalvik

Ntnu, Norway

Introduction

Using different kinds of collaborative learning is an approach to learning where the goal is to activate the learner in their own learning process. At the Department of Social Work at <our organisation> , collaborative learning is a widespread teaching method focusing on a student-centered approach. Bachelor Students attending this education have collaborated a lot during their study period.

Aim

The purpose of the study was to investigate what Bachelor Students experience as suitable collaborative learning with each other on Campus. The thesis question is: “What do Bachelor Students experience as suitable in collaborative learning face-to-face on Campus?"

Method/ Program Description

Data were obtained from three focus group interviews with 13 third-year Bachelor Students at the Department of Social Work in the spring of 2019. Based on Stepwise-Deductive Inductive analysis of the data in combination with NVivo the empirically close codes were categorized into topics.

Results/ Evaluation

Three topics were identified: the role of the teacher, the need for preparation before collaborative learning and knowledge construction.

Conclusion

The findings indicate that Bachelor Students experience that suitable use of collaborative learning in face-to-face-relations presupposes an organizational framework that contributes to make individual learning possible.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Collaborative learning in face-to-face environments has an obvious Human Touch to it. Students attending Higher Education is a part of the digital society and in the 21st-century employment market, being able to work effectively and productive with others in teams is essential.

Biography and Bibliography
I am a University Librarian, and I have been working at the Library Section for Medicine and Health Sciences for the last 16 years. I have a Master Thesis in Pedagogy. I am teaching Information Literacy for Health Sciences Students, and I am also attending a team teaching NVivo for Researchers. I support Researchers with systematic literature searching for Reviews.


10:45am - 11:00am
ID: 203 / 3.2: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Teaching data literacy in academic libraries

Edit Gorogh, Judit Fazekas-Paragh

University of Debrecen, Hungary

Academic libraries are considered to be a repository for knowledge, teaching and research supporting tools. As research is changing, expanding and transforming, libraries must adapt in their research support methods, and keep widening the availability of resources and expertise. In recent years, data have become a more visible part of research, thus academic libraries must add data literacy to their research support portfolio and start offering resources for researchers to learn about data management and its benefits.

The EU funded project DaLiCo (Data Literacy in Context) is dedicated to increase the visibility, quality and usage of existing data literacy activities at a university level. The project aims at establishing collaborations between academic partners (departments, library, external partners) to convey data literacy competencies and contribute to the cultural change toward stronger data managing skills and openness.

The research data lifecycle (plan-collect-analyse-preserve-share-reuse) provides numerous intervention points where research support agents, librarians can play a large part in the discovery, understanding, and curation of research data. Libraries can (1) provide access to data information (data availability, data sharing, data preservation, etc.), (2) offer services on research data management, and (3) support data science by providing access to training and instructional materials to help improve the knowledge and skill base surrounding data.

Connecting to data driven research and related data literacy education, DaLiCo develops a Train the Trainer program to enhance data literacy and skills education among researchers. The primary aim of the program is to build a modular teaching framework which provides methodological and content support for involved stakeholders (researchers, teachers, librarians) for transferring knowledge on data science. This program can also be integrated into the teaching and support toolbox of libraries. Librarians’ expertise in data management and knowledge transfer can serve as the foundation for the training of the next generations of data scientists.

The presentation at the EAHIL2022 will showcase the DaLiCo Train the Trainer program and demonstrate how such program can be included in academic libraries’ research support portfolio. The presentation also incorporates the result of a DaLiCo summer school in 2021 where data science methods and skills related to the medical field were in the focus of the training.



11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 123 / 3.2: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Discovering hidden jewels: the value of internal skills for professional growth, responsible research and innovation. A training experience

Paola De Castro, Giuse Ardita, Maria Cristina Barbaro, Anna Rita Barbaro, Paco Dionisio, Arianna Gasparini, Cristina Gasparrini, Donatella Gentili, Patrizia Mochi, Federica Napolitani, Paola Pecci, Sandra Salinetti, Monica Zedda

Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy

Introduction
Health information, communication and library skills are sometimes under-evaluated among the colleagues working in the same institution, while these same skills feed training courses addressed to external users receiving high appreciation. Starting from this consideration, an original online training program addressed to internal users was developed at the National Institute of Health in <our country> (<our institute>), to share library and communication skills among <our institute> researchers in an informal environment.

Aim
This training experience is reported to stress the value of internal capacity building and staff motivation for professional development, institutional cohesion, responsible research and innovation.

Program Description
The program was developed and implemented during the pandemic year 2021. The main topics regarded: use of library resources, research evaluation, authors’ unique IDs and profiles maintenance, choice of the journal to submit an article, editorial rules, effective communication. They were spanned into 7 workshops, organized by two <our institute> structures: Knowledge (Documentation and Library) and Scientific Communication. Eleven teachers/facilitators and 4 secretaries were involved. Two members of the above team were also responsible for the scientific and technical organization, under the supervision of the Director of the two Structures. The online Teams Office 365 platform was used; participants were limited to 20 per session to guarantee interaction; the duration of each session was each two hours.

Evaluation
The high number of applications received (334) is evidence of the interest in the training offer. Two editions were organized from April to November 2021, for a total of 24 teaching hours. The experience involved 132 <our institute> employees, mostly women (89%) that is about 8.25% of the total <our institute> staff (about 1600). The teaching material was based on proven staff skills and training experience with the added value of a uniform graphic layout. Most participants provided positive feedback in the Teams chats. About 80% of them completed the satisfaction questionnaires administered at the end of each workshop. All teachers/facilitators, organizers and secretarial staff were enthusiastic of this new form of collaboration despite some minor technical difficulties. They declared that they improved their knowledge to present updated material to their colleagues and face the challenge of a new online training format.

Conclusion
The initiative was successful in terms of improved knowledge, awareness and trust in library and communication services within the institution; aggregation of internal staff; development of collaborations; awareness of the economic value of the services and return of investment. Yet, we are aware that developing a culture of knowledge sharing is a complex process requiring time, planning and active involvement of both the top management and the employees.

Human Touch

The experience contributed to develop awareness on the value of the human factor and internal motivation for professional development.

The experience contributed to develop awareness on the value of the human factor and internal motivation for professional development. This communication reports the <our institute> training experience addressed to internal staff to stress the value of internal capacity building and staff motivation for professional development, institutional cohesion, responsible research and innovation.

Biography and Bibliography
Paola De Castro. Director of the Scientific Communication Unit at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), the National Institute of Health in Italy (www.iss.it). She develops and implements strategies to support science communication at different levels, including the management of ISS publications (journals, technical reports, newsletters, and others) and the organisation of events addressed to different stakeholders. She participates in multidisciplinary research and training for public health, mainly focused on science communication, health equity, health literacy, and scientific writing, with research partnerships in Europe, Latin America, and Africa. She is also Director if the ISS Interactive Museum for Public Health and, more recently of the ISS Scientific Library providing access to over 20 thousand scientific journals and the most relevand biomedical databases. Such activities provide a wider vision of science communication and allow to create links and connections with different research groups and stakeholders.

De Castro P, Salinetti S, Barbaro MC, et al. Information specialists and researchers working together for health promotion: Benefits from school-work educational programmes at the National Institute of Health in Italy. Health Info Libr J. 2021;00:1–5. https://doi.org/10.1111/hir.12375 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/hir.12375

Bertinato L, Brambilla G, De Castro P, et al How can we manage the COVID-19 infodemics? A case study targeted to health workers in Italy. Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità 2021;57(2):121-127. https://www.iss.it/documents/20126/0/ANN_21_02_02.pdf https://www.iss.it/documents/20126/0/ANN_21_02_02.pdf

Bucciardini, R., Contoli, B., De Castro, P. et al. The health equity in all policies (HEiAP) approach before and beyond the Covid-19 pandemic in the Italian context. Int J Equity Health 2020;19, 92. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12939-020-01209-0
https://equityhealthj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12939-020-01209-0

De Castro P, et al. Training for community health workers: the first step towards a model of community antiretroviral therapy delivery. African Journal of social work. 2019, n. 2
https://www.ajol.info/index.php/ajsw/article/view/192187


11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 118 / 3.2: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Librarian involvement in curriculum design, teaching, and summative assessment: a case study from University of Cambridge Medical Library

Veronica Phillips, Eleanor Barker

University of Cambridge Medical Library, United Kingdom

Introduction
Although librarians working in the higher education sector are often involved in teaching, they are not often involved in the summative assessment of students' work. Bewick and Corrall (2010) found that only 9% of survey respondents were involved in any formal assessment. Librarians usually formatively assess their students, but rarely do they see the final pieces of work. Meanwhile, in the few instances in which librarians summatively assess their students, they have used it as an opportunity to reflect on their teaching, and adapt elements which were not particularly effective (Haber and Mitchell, 2017).
Aim
This presentation will recount how University of Cambridge Medical Library became involved not only in curriculum design and information skills teaching, but also summative assessment of those skills. It will discuss how the librarians ensured consistency in the grades awarded, and how this work helped assess teaching efficacy, and enabled adaptation of future information skills teaching.
Program Description
In the fourth year of their training, clinical students at University of Cambridge undertake the Student Selected Component (SSC). This requires them to select a topic of interest, and carry out an independent project. One of the required outputs is a ‘described literature search,’ which also fulfils the General Medical Council’s expectation that newly qualified doctors must demonstrate that they are able to ‘access and analyse reliable sources of current clinical evidence and guidance and have established methods for making sure their practice is consistent with these’ (General Medical Council, 2018).
The Medical Library team teaches some of the skills for these SSC projects. However, although librarians were solely responsible for teaching this component of the curriculum, they did not assess the outcome – the ‘described literature search’ – which was assessed by academics in the Clinical School. From 2021 onwards, the Medical Library team have been involved in the assessment of the described literature searches.
Results/ Evaluation
Evaluation of the effectiveness of this summative assessment took two forms - ensuring consistency of the grades awarded, and using the students' submitted work to check comprehension and the effectiveness of the library's teaching. The presentation will discuss how this evaluation was undertaken, and any resulting changes in practice.
Conclusion

This presentation offers a case study in librarian involvement in summative assessment of students' information skills. It evaluates the results of this involvement, and provides a model for other librarians interested in getting involved in this aspect of education and teaching.

Human Touch

This presentation demonstrates ways in which librarians can forge professional connections in their organisations, building networks with academics, students, and administrators while improving their own teaching skills.

Bibliography

BEWICK, L. & CORRALL, S. 2010. Developing librarians as teachers: A study of their pedagogical knowledge. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 42, 97-110.

GENERAL MEDICAL COUNCIL. 2018. Outcomes for graduates [Online]. Available: https://www.gmc-uk.org/-/media/documents/dc11326-outcomes-for-graduates-2018_pdf-75040796.pdf [Accessed 20 November 2021].

HABER, N. & MITCHELL, T. N. 2017. Using formative & summative assessment to evaluate library instruction in an online first year writing course. Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning, 11, 300-313.

Biography and Bibliography
Veronica Phillips is Assistant Librarian at the University of Cambridge Medical Library. Her work involves research support and information skills teaching for medical students and researchers at the University of Cambridge, and NHS staff working in the East of England region. For the full list of her publications, see her ORCiD profile: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4383-9434

Eleanor Barker is Assistant Librarian at the University of Cambridge Medical Library. Her work involves research support and information skills teaching for medical students and researchers at the University of Cambridge, and NHS staff working in the East of England region. For the full list of her publications, see her ORCiD profile: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5472-2496


11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 222 / 3.2: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Reimagining Book Clubs as an Extensible Instruction Tool and a Catalyst for Change

Colleen Cuddy

Stanford University, United States of America

Introduction

Workplace book clubs help build and reinforce relationships, help employees become more confident and comfortable in professional discussions, and better understand diverse perspectives (Coleman, 2016). They provide opportunities for clinical trainees and practitioners to engage with the narrative of health and social care and human experience—not just the clinical problem (Penson, 2011). Additionally, book clubs can increase a student’s participation in their own learning, enhance social proficiency, and develop discussion skills. (Sedo, 2003)

In 2020, Stanford School of Medicine’s Lane Medical Library launched several "discussion groups". A re-envisioned book club format replaced the traditional long format book with a curated selection of short articles and videos successfully lowering attendance barriers due to time constraints of busy medical professionals. Initially devised to spark conversation and promote a call to action on social justice and medicine, the discussion groups became a catalyst for imagining and creating change through micro-moves at the school of medicine and the healthcare system.

Aim

This session will share the lessons we learned in establishing and running discussion groups and provide a framework for those considering using book clubs and media discussion groups for education and instruction. Sample discussion prompts, code of conduct, and syllabi will be shared.

Method/ Program Description

Discussion groups are normally held during lunch hours and last just 60 minutes. An invited subject expert launches the group by framing the learning theme. Small groups in breakout sessions move through carefully constructed prompts designed to engage participants in lively and respectful discussions. A final prompt requires participants to reflect and commit to steps they might take as an individual, workgroup, or department to address social issues in medicine based on their learning.

In addition to the live format, a companion website allows participants to work through the materials on their own or reuse the materials for further discussion.

Results/ Evaluation

All participants are sent an evaluation form following the sessions. The discussion groups are well-attended, and the response has been overwhelmingly positive, becoming a “favorite format of the anti-racism focused events” on campus. Discussion groups are continuing in areas of diversity and medicine, allyship, intersectionality, and organizational culture. The library work with multiple stakeholders on campus, such as the hospital employee resource groups. Additionally, the library has worked with the Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) to grant CME credits to attendees. There has been a cascading effect with several attendees adapting the content to provide similar sessions to departments at our institution and at other medical schools.

Conclusion

Book clubs and discussion groups are a timely and effective instruction method for health sciences libraries, particularly in the area of health equity and social justice.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Discussion groups offered by the library provide a unique forum for students, faculty, residents and staff to come together to discuss and take personal action on important societal issues as they relate to medicine.



11:45am - 12:00pm
ID: 204 / 3.2: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Library-faculty collaboration – Academic writing and the just in time-principle

Jessica Lönn-Stensrud, Julie Skattebu

University of Oslo, Norway

Introduction

Clear and comprehensible communication is central for professional studies within health sciences, e.g., dentistry. In their future professions the students must be able to communicate with colleagues, patients, and other authorities. To strengthen the student’s communication skills, as well as facilitate the process of writing the master thesis, the Library of medicine and science together with the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Oslo has started a collaboration on academic writing. Training in academic writing and information literacy has previously taken place in the Research methods course at the beginning of the master project course. At this point the students have not yet started to work on their master project. Therefore, there is discrepancy between what the students were offered, compared to when they needed it.

Another challenge is that most of the students consider communication as being a less important part of their education, and therefore don’t put much effort into the writing process.
Aim

In this new project, academic writing together with information literacy has been planned to follow the student’s scientific maturation and writing process from start to finish. By following the writing process and offering learning activities when they need them, we aim to:
a) guide the students through the writing process.
b) highlight communication as an important generic skill.
c) raise the quality of the master theses.

Method/ Program Description

We have initiated a project together with the Faculty of dentistry where we will develop a plan for courses and learning activities spread placed strategically throughout the master project. By collaborating with colleagues at the Library for medicine and science, learners at the faculty, and the administration we identified content following the writing process.
Results/ Evaluation

We have piloted courses following students in the same year group and evaluated the new content by using standardized answers as well as open ended questions about timeliness, usefulness, and content wishes. We have received very positive feedback on student activities, on the timeliness, and especially the effort to engage in the students writing process. We have also received feedback from the students that has been very useful in the dialog with the faculty.
Conclusion

This collaboration has given us the opportunity to examine the student writing process and include and adapt courses to where the students ought to be in the process of writing their master thesis.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Offering the students the tools they need when they need them helps to ensure that the students deliver on time, and that they build their communication and academic writing skills at the same time.



12:00pm - 12:15pm
ID: 198 / 3.2: 7
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Continuing professional development for the health professions: A complete library approach

Jamie M. Gray

Weill Cornell Medicine - Qatar, Qatar

Background: Taking part in continuing professional development (CPD) activities is an expectation across professions. This is particularly true of those employed in medicine, nursing, pharmacy and allied health. Most health libraries are involved in teaching library workshops, engaging with the curriculum and providing individual consultations on a variety of topics. Expanding to support continuing professional development activities is a natural next step. The library had sporadically been involved in delivering one time CPD accredited workshops in the past to the local community. However, in early 2020 the director decide to focus on building out library delivered CPD activities into a formal part of the library’s teaching.

Method: The idea was to deliver out of the box content which was within the library skillset, but that could enhance clinical practice. The plan was to focus on developing courses which could be offered multiple times within the accreditation period vs. a one time delivery. To facilitate the creation and delivery of multiple courses, one team member’s job description was revised to support and guide the application process within the division. Beginning small, the initial workshop undertaking focused on the development of a series of health communication workshops with two team members. During 2021, additional team members from across the entire division began to plan activities representing expertise from all three library teams.

Results: The first library workshop focused on visual literacy in health communication and was delivered in November 2020. The second was designed around plain language writing and took place in June 2021. The third and final session in the series is temporarily on pause but is hoped to be delivered by the end of 2022. To date, the visual literacy workshop has been offered three times. New sessions which are under development for delivery in 2022 are focused on clinical data management and health information. In addition to the noted workshops, the library has participated in the college’s Grand Rounds lectures as well as a specialized COVID-19 webinar series. The sessions thus far have been well received. Data is still under collection and will be shared at the conference.

Conclusion: Developing and delivering CPD accredited content has allowed the library to expand its reach into the local community. It has also highlighted unique expertise held within the library to members of the college community, helping to increase the division’s visibility. Although building an accredited course is time intensive, the received benefit of engaging with faculty in a context they recognize and value has proved well worth the investment.

Human Touch: Learning, Connection

 
10:30am - 12:15pm3.3: Workshop Information Retrieval
Location: Zeelenberg
 
ID: 193 / 3.3: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Search Strategy Optimization with open access tools: Is R user-friendly enough for information specialists?

Claudia Kapp1, Sarah Young2, Elke Hausner1

1IQWiG (Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care), Germany; 2Carnegie Mellon University Libraries, USA

Biography and Bibliography
We are information specialists from an HTA Agency and librarians working in the academic setting offering perspectives on the scope of open access tools in evidence synthesis.

Claudia Kapp:
I work at the German HTA agency IQWiG as a information specialist and focus on the implementation of open access tools in information retrieval.

Sarah Young:
As a social sciences librarian, I am broadly interested in the use and synthesis of information and data toward the improvement and evaluation of policy, programs and practice. As a former health sciences librarian, I developed expertise in literature searching for systematic reviews and evidence syntheses. I currently serve as a liaison to public policy, politics, information systems, statistics and data science programs at Carnegie Mellon University and lead our evidence synthesis service. I am a co-organizer of our Carpentries training program, am a certified Carpentries instructor and helped to co-develop a Library Carpentry lesson on the R package litsearchr.
 
10:30am - 12:15pm3.4: Workshop Information Retrieval
Location: Schadee
 
ID: 173 / 3.4: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Live searching with Wichor Bramer

Wichor Bramer, Elise Krabbendam, Sabrina Gunput, Maarten Engel

Erasmus MC, Netherlands, The

Biography and Bibliography
Wichor Bramer is medical information specialist at Erasmus MC in Rotterdam. He has developed a method that helps him create searches for systematic reviews much faster than other information specialists. He successfully defended his PhD thesis on this topic in October 2019.
 
12:15pm - 1:45pmLunch / Exhibition
Location: Willem Burgerfoyer
12:45pm - 1:45pmPoster Presentations 2: Even Numbers
Location: Willem Burgerfoyer
 
ID: 140 / Poster Presentations 2: 1
Poster
Topics: Professionals Connected

Measuring the impact of knowledge brokers in Local Authority Public Health teams

Samuel Thomas, Charlotte Prew

UK Health Security Agency

Introduction:

Local Authority Public Health (LAPH) teams have been on the frontline of the response to the Covid-19 pandemic in England. As part of our institutions remit to work collaboratively and support the wider public health agenda, seven new Knowledge and Evidence Specialists (KES) roles were created to work alongside and support LAPH teams in their response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Key Knowledge and Library (KLS) services provided included a literature searching service, information literacy training and an enquiry service.

Objectives:

To measure the impact of the new KES roles in mobilising knowledge and information for LAPH teams to support their response to the Covid-19 pandemic in England.

Methods:

Impact stories and feedback questionnaires were used to determine the impact the KES roles have had on LAPH teams since January 2021. Feedback was received in respect of the literature searches and information skills training provided by the KES. To determine if the new roles increased the uptake of KLS services by LAPH teams, quantitative and qualitative data was collected and analysed. This included the number of completed literature searches and enquiries, and website metrics for our institutions KLS local authority public health webpages.

Results:

Since January 2021, over 160 literature searches have been undertaken for more than 50 different LAPH teams in England. 43 hours were cumulatively spent providing virtual information skills training to LAPH teams. Website metrics analysis demonstrated a 445% increase in KLS local authority public health webpage views compared to 2020, and there was a high volume of enquiries and requests for support from LAPH teams.

Impact stories and feedback received from LAPH teams demonstrated that the KES had an impact on the work of LAPH teams. Literature searches were described as being used to support formal reports and Needs Assessments, and to inform the commissioning and planning of future services. The time saving benefits of public health information specialists undertaking literature searches for public health professionals was also noted by LAPH teams.

Conclusions:

The increase in engagement by LAPH teams in England with the services provided by the KES’s suggests, as knowledge brokers, they were effective in promoting their services to LAPH teams. The KES have been successful in connecting with LAPH teams to support evidence-informed decision making, staff learning and continued professional development of LAPH teams during the Covid-19 pandemic. The results of this analysis will inform future workforce and service planning. It is recommended that LAPH teams continue to embed evidence-informed decision-making in their response to the Covid-19 pandemic, as well as other activities, by utilising the support of knowledge and information professionals.

Human touch:

Embedding services for local authority staff has given us a detailed insight into their knowledge and information needs, and our role as knowledge brokers has enabled us to facilitate open dialogue between public health professionals.

Biography and Bibliography
Samuel Thomas is a Knowledge and Evidence Specialist working for UK Health Security Agency, having started at its predecessor Public Health England in July 2019. Prior to this, he worked for Bournemouth University Library Service whilst completing a MSc in Information Management at UWE Bristol. Librarianship is a second career for Samuel, having spent 7 years working as an Orthoptist in the NHS prior to commencing his Master’s degree in 2017.

Charlotte Prew is a Knowledge and Evidence Specialist for the UK Health Security Agency. She has worked in public health librarianship since 2013, where in Public Health England she started her professional career. In 2020, she completed her MA in Information and Library Studies (at Aberystwyth University). She also has a research interest in bibliotherapy and wellbeing collections and their usage as workplace wellbeing interventions.

Thomas-Measuring the impact of knowledge brokers in Local Authority Public Health teams-140_a.pptx

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ID: 144 / Poster Presentations 2: 2
Poster
Topics: Everything interesting

Participation in European Union co-funded projects opens space for more interaction between library staff and academics.

Bogumila Bruc

Information and Library Centre of the Medical University of Lodz, Poland,, Poland

Introduction

For several years, the librarians at our institution have been involved in various EU co-financed projects. In collaboration with other departments of the University, many assignments have been completed, e.g. creating a new database presenting the scholarly output of academic staff; information platform about the scientific activity; and scanning old prints and placing them on a digital platform. In addition, the library was upgraded with some modern computer programs and electronic equipment. Thanks to EU funds, our librarians were able to improve their professional skills and competencies by participating in workshops both in the country and abroad. At the University, librarians had the opportunity to participate in workshops organized by staff from other departments as well as were able to share their knowledge of up-to-date resources related to scientific information.

Objectives

The group of information specialists has organized a series of lectures and workshops on promoting electronic resources subscribed by the University. Among the various presentations, there are topics on the use of databases, open access licenses, how to write a scientific paper or systematic review. Many academics are not familiar with the extended library resources or expertise of the librarians. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, classes were held in-person, in the library building. During the pandemic period, classes have been conducted online on MS Teams or Big Blue Button. So far, the information specialists have led ovwe 200 sessions and have trained approximately 1,300 academics. The classes offered by the Library are still quite popular. All classes require participants to complete the pre-tests and post-tests, as well as evaluation surveys. Among the many reviews, we got outstanding recognition for our knowledge and skills. Moreover, we have noticed an increase in asking for assistance from academic teachers who attended the sessions. They are more likely to ask for help with literature search in databases or using bibliographic managers. Nowadays, we are getting more requests to organize topic-specific workshops to support faculties and students. We have also noticed that within the academic community there is an increased awareness about our proficiency to support university employees.

Conclusion

Thanks to taking part in EU co-funded projects we have created the opportunity to open space for interaction with other departments of the University. The important benefits are: providing expertise to the academic community, reciprocal learning to improve our services and functions. Also, we have an opportunity to grow professionally to gain additional competencies and knowledge from academic experts.

We hope to continue this collaboration and strive for excellence in providing library services.

Human Touch (Recommended)


Bruc-Participation in European Union co-funded projects opens space-144_a.pdf

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ID: 162 / Poster Presentations 2: 3
Poster
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Influence of Methodological Expertise on Assessment of Systematic Review Searches using PRISMA and AMSTAR

Melissa L. Rethlefsen1, Shelley de Kock2

1University of New Mexico Health Sciences Library & Informatics Center, United States of America; 2Health Economics & Outcomes Research Ltd

Introduction
Many studies have assessed PRISMA compliance of systematic reviews in biomedical disciplines, including items relating to information sources and search strategies. Additional studies have used AMSTAR, AMSTAR 2, or R-AMSTAR to assess systematic review quality, including the comprehensiveness of the search methods.
Aim
In this study, we will examine whether searching expertise is associated with lower perceived compliance with PRISMA items relating to search methods and AMSTAR ratings of search comprehensiveness
Method/ Program Description
We will identify studies that evaluate biomedical systematic reviews on compliance with PRISMA 2009, PRISMA 2020, or relevant PRISMA extensions (e.g., PRISMA-EcoEvo, PRISMA-S, PRISMA Harms, etc) or critically appraise them using AMSTAR, AMSTAR 2, or R-AMSTAR as a primary outcome. Studies that use PRISMA, a PRISMA extension, AMSTAR, AMSTAR 2, or R-AMSTAR as part of a critical appraisal for inclusion in a systematic review, umbrella systematic review, evidence map, or other evidence synthesis will be excluded. We will conduct a search in Ovid MEDLINE ALL <1946 to December 13, 2021> to identify studies added to MEDLINE from July 31, 2017 to the present. Earlier studies using PRISMA will be identified from Page & Moher’s prior scoping review [1]; earlier studies using AMSTAR will be identified with an additional MEDLINE search. We will screen each study for inclusion in duplicate using Covidence. For each identified study, we will determine whether the search was assessed. For each aspect of the search assessed, we will record the number of systematic reviews in the study, the number of systematic reviews meeting search-related criteria, any definitions for how the authors interpreted search-related criteria, and whether librarians or information specialists contributed to the assessment. We will also record whether the study included systematic reviews published before and/or after the publication of PRISMA 2009. Due to the heterogenous nature of the data, basic descriptive statistics will be used to present findings.
Results/ Evaluation
MEDLINE searches were conducted on December 14, 2021. 1,627 results were found. Full results will be presented at EAHIL.
Conclusion

Full conclusions will be presented at EAHIL.

Human Touch (Recommended)

We anticipate that this study will add to professionalism, understanding, and knowledge of information specialists as experts in systematic review work.

1. Page MJ, Moher D. Evaluations of the uptake and impact of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement and extensions: a scoping review. Syst Rev. 2017 Dec 19;6(1):263. doi: 10.1186/s13643-017-0663-8. PMID: 29258593; PMCID: PMC5738221.


Rethlefsen-Influence of Methodological Expertise on Assessment of Systematic Review Searches using PRISMA and_a.pdf

Rethlefsen-Influence of Methodological Expertise on Assessment of Systematic Review Searches using PRISMA and_b.docx

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ID: 196 / Poster Presentations 2: 4
Poster
Topics: Professionals Connected

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Documentation Centre of Istituto Superiore di Sanità

Scilla Pizzarelli, Rosaria Rosanna Cammarano, Paola De Castro

Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy

Introduction

The COVID-19 health emergency has changed the work life across the world. Strict rules and measures of social distancing have been introduced and, abruptly, many workers have been requested to switch to remote working.

In the early phase of the pandemic there was a total uncertainty on the virus and the disease it causes, which were later defined, respectively, “SARS-CoV-2” and “COVID-19”. The first literature searches on the new coronavirus were performed by the researchers themselves. The results of such searches-even if precious at the moment- were not so accurate as those designed by information specialists, who were immediately involved in specific searches.

Aim

The purpose of this poster is to describe the challenges faced during the compulsory home confinement by the Documentation Centre staff of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità.

Program Description

Face-to-face interactions were replaced by emails, phone calls and videoconferences on a variety of virtual platforms, such as Microsoft Teams, Google Meet and StarLeaf. This plethora of tools was used by the ISS information specialists to stay closely in touch, despite the physical distance, to share ideas and ensure effective teamwork.

Within this collaborative environment the following initiatives were adopted:

a) A COVID-19 search strategy was developed, at the very beginning of the crisis, to quickly answer potential clinical queries on the topic

b) The new subject “COVID-19” was added to the Italian Bioethics Thesaurus used for the indexing of SIBIL, a bioethical database created and mantained by the <our organization> Documentation Centre since 2001

c) A distance-learning course on PubMed, with a special focus on COVID-19 resources, was planned.

Evaluation

The accomplishments achieved in remote work modality included:

a) Nearly 90 literature searches were run to support ISS ongoing research activities and meet the information demands arising from the emergency. COVID-19 related searches were conducted both on biomedical databases and preprint servers in order to retrieve the latest findings on the topic

b) Almost 400 records were added to the SIBIL database, 40 of which on the ethical implications of COVID-19

c) Over 3,300 health professionals from the National Health Service were trained on the use of PubMed through the <our organization> e-learning platform

d) More than 200 full-text articles were ordered to the National Library of Medicine (Bethesda, USA) for internal and external users

Conclusion

For a small group of information specialists the management of information requests can be hard, but in situations out of the ordinary, like a global pandemic, the workload can become overwhelming and generate stress, anxiety and burnout.

Yet, the team members adapted their practices to the fully digital environment and used diverse channels of communication to keep alive their sense of belonging and boost collaboration.

Such a strategy enhanced job satisfaction with the final result to increase overall productivity and performances.

Human touch

The COVID-19 emergency has demonstrated that technology plays a key role in facilitating communication and building collaborative environments in absence of in-person contacts. On the other hand, it has also reminded us the importance of human touch.

Biography and Bibliography
As information professional at the ISS Documentation Sector developed knowledge and expertise in all aspects of online searching, document delivery, and professional training and teaching. In charge of the scientific organization of training courses for the National Health Service personnel interested in the retrieval of electronic information. Member of the work group “Tesauro italiano di bioetica” within the SIBIL database. Participant in various research projects. Author of publications and technical reports in the information sector (https://publ.iss.it/ITA/Items/FreeSearch?freeText=pizzarelli%20scilla)

Pizzarelli-The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Documentation Centre of Istituto Superiore di Sanità-196_a.pptx

Pizzarelli-The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Documentation Centre of Istituto Superiore di Sanità-196_b.png
 


ID: 216 / Poster Presentations 2: 5
Poster
Topics: Professionals Connected

Knowledge makes the world go round: Librarians working together to fight the COVID infodemic

Caroline De Brún

UK Health Security Agency, United Kingdom

Introduction: This outbreak has been the opportunity for increased partnership-working among librarians. There has been an unprecedented volume of literature published about COVID-19, and a rapid response to manage all this information has been essential. With most librarians unable to travel to conferences, new opportunities have arisen to work collaboratively, and with advances in technology it has been possible to work on projects remotely with librarians around the world.

This poster highlights examples of health librarians working together to share and peer review search strategies, test and showcase new information sources, discuss issues, such as the use of preprints in research production, share details of reviews that each organisation is working on to avoid duplication of effort, inform the development of guidance for best practices for searching, and also provide moral support.

Aim: The main aims of this work were to provide professional support to colleagues, information support to users, improve quality of searches, reduce duplication by librarians and researchers, and to overcome the issue of fake news.

Program Description: When it was first announced, researchers, attempting to identify everything known about this COVID-19, rushed to publish their findings, while publishers made all their coronavirus-related content open access. Researchers bypassed the peer-review process, by launching their research on preprint servers, making their findings more quickly accessible, but without the benefit of peer-review. This opened a tidal wave of information for decision-makers and required the information management skills of librarians to bring that wave under control.

During this outbreak, librarians from the <our institute> (formerly <our institute> ) have been fortunate to work with, and learn from, information specialists and librarians from the <names of various institutions>.

Results: The results of these collaborations include robust search strategies, evaluation of new information sources, reduction in research duplication, evolved as a way of coping with the information overload that was a significant outcome of the outbreak. There has not been a formal evaluation of this activity, as it evolved organically, changing to adapt to the situation. The successes are intangible but are evident in various guises. Search results have become more robust and comprehensive, as librarians work together to identify new terms, techniques, and information sources. Working together reduced the feeling of isolation, which improved well-being. Time was saved as a result of sharing search strategies and knowledge of ongoing reviews.

Conclusion: The pandemic has highlighted the essential role that librarians play during public health emergencies. The international partnerships that have been formed have enriched research outputs and strengthened library teams working to overcome the infodemic. Professional skills have been developed and knowledge of new resources have been obtained. Librarians have acted as knowledge brokers, connecting research organisations to reduce the amount of research wastage. This poster highlights examples of librarians working together to alleviate the consequences of the infodemic, ensuring policy-makers, researchers, and the public have access to timely and accurate information.

Biography and Bibliography
The author has been a medical librarian since 1999, and has worked in difference sectors, including primary care, as an outreach librarian, secondary care, as a clinical librarian, and public health, as an embedded librarian. She has also worked in mental health, and on national projects, including a virtual library. She has co-written a book on searching skills and various chapters on knowledge management, information literacy, and research methods for health emergency and disaster risk management.

De Brún-Knowledge makes the world go round-216_a.pptx

De Brún-Knowledge makes the world go round-216_b.jpg

De Brún-Knowledge makes the world go round-216_c.pdf


ID: 178 / Poster Presentations 2: 6
Poster
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Development of extremely long search strategies in medical databases - two case studies

Wichor Bramer, Elise Krabbendam

Erasmus MC, Netherlands, The

Introduction
Medical research topics often consist of many terms. For a complete overview of all relevant studies a database search should contain all terms relevant to the topic. This can be very challenging. Is there a limit to the length of the search strategy? How many proximity operators can be used in a search? Can a database handle extremely long queries?
Aim
On two separate occasions researchers from our institute asked us to create a search strategy for the terms in a document that they had prepared for us. One such document was over 100 pages long describing all metabolic diseases and it contained a wide variety of thesaurus terms and synonyms, most of which consisted of long phrases. Our aim was to develop a search working strategy for the terms in that document.
Program Description
Using the find and replace fuction in Word we were able to semi-automatically replace certain common words or expressions and transform the list of terms into a working search strategy. We tested the seach in batches of 4-5 pages to spot errors in the search that we manually corrected. The corrected search batches were then combined into one search strategy.
Results/ Evaluation
After 20 hours we had created a search working search strategy for all terms in the word document. The ultimate search was a 33 page long single search strategy that could be copied and pasted and was run in embase.com. It was then translated into Medline Ovid, and ran there as well. The searches in both databases could be executed without problems, thought they took long to return the results: 2.5 minutes in embase.com and 17 minutes in Ovid.
Conclusion

Using find and replace functionality in MS Word information specialists can create very long search strategies. There is no limit to the complexity of searches on the platforms of embase.com and Ovid.

Human Touch (Recommended)

When confronted with extreme requests by researchers to create search strategies information specialist now have the tools to create complex search strategies. It might however be wise not to promote this among researchers as the time needed to develop such search strategies is substantial.


Bramer-Development of extremely long search strategies in medical databases-178_a.pdf

Bramer-Development of extremely long search strategies in medical databases-178_b.pdf

Bramer-Development of extremely long search strategies in medical databases-178_c.jpg


ID: 150 / Poster Presentations 2: 7
Poster
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Using citation searching in Health Technology Assessment searches - a pilot study

Therese Svanberg, Ida Stadig

Medical Library, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden

Introduction

The concept of using citation analysis in systematic literature searches has grown in recent years. Up til now, our group of information specialists have only been using backward citation searching and would now like to explore other areas of citation analysis, such as forward citation.

The information specialists at our medical library perform literature searches to hospital employees, as well as to a regional Health Technology Assessment (HTA) unit. In the HTA projects, the information specialists both perform the literature searches and screen records for inclusion. This gives us a unique opportunity to evaluate searches, knowing which articles are included in the final report.

Aim

In a small batch of literature searches for our regional HTA unit we will compare our standard method of searching, ie using bibliographic databases and backward citation tracking, with a new way of searching using forward citation tracking. Does it retrieve additional relevant studies? How could this method be used in our search routine?

Method/ Program Description

We will use Web of Science, Scopus and some web-based tool/s for forward citation searching to perform a retroactive evaluation of a small number of systematic literature searches for HTA reports. We will investigate if forward citation searching would have retrieved all included articles and if it would have added relevant articles not already included.

We will also use this method in at least one ongoing HTA project, to investigate how best to incorporate it in our search routine.

Results/ Evaluation

This will be a small case study to explore the possibilities of incorporating forward citation searching in our standard searching procedure. Results will be presented in the final poster.

Conclusion

Since this will only be a small case study, conclusions drawn can only be very tentative and used as a basis for further research.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This is an exciting area new to us. We want to take this opportunity to explore and learn new things, hoping to improve our search process.

Biography and Bibliography
The authors work at a medical library at a university hospital and have been working with information retrieval for systematic reviews and health technology assessments for several years.

Stadig I, Svanberg T. Overview of information retrieval in a hospital-based
health technology assessment center in a Swedish region. Int J Technol Assess
Health Care. 2021 Apr 12;37(1):e52. doi: 10.1017/S0266462321000106.

Databases used for systematic reviews – how much is enough? Therese Svanberg, Ida Stadig. POSTER 4. Poster Presentation Abstracts. Eahil Lodz 2020. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1QcVAtEZo5klzrBMpHY0Pui7Z42dvyLuU/view

Svanberg-Using citation searching in Health Technology Assessment searches-150_a.pdf

Svanberg-Using citation searching in Health Technology Assessment searches-150_b.docx

Svanberg-Using citation searching in Health Technology Assessment searches-150_c.png


ID: 209 / Poster Presentations 2: 8
Poster
Topics: Education

Youtube videos for improving literacy skills for cancer healthcare professionals and improve patient empowerment.

Chiara Cipolat Mis, Emanuela Ferrarin, Mattia Garutti, Fabio Puglisi, Riccardo Bianchet

CRO Aviano, National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Italy

Introduction

Health communication emerges as one of the most issues in current years. Although health care professionals have historically been the primary source of information for patients, the Internet era has widely reshaped this paradigm [1]. Within cancer setting, information and communication are particularly challenging because of patients wide needs [2], also in the time of COVID. According to the objective of “Communication skills training for healthcare professionals working with people who have cancer”[3] Scientific and Patients Library at CRO Aviano, National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano, Italy, continues the production of patients leaflets [4] and the organization of patients and family classes. To extend these information tools and promote physicians and HCPs communication skills, a new set of informative videos (Filodietto project) has been included in our Patient Education and Empowerment programme [5].

Aim

Improving patients empowerment and communication skills of physicians and HCPs through a process of building informative videos in partnership with health librarians.

Method/ Program Description

The topics for videos have been selected considering patients information needs, collected from everyday clinical practice.

Filodiretto drafts are built in three steps:

1 Physicians and HCPs write drafts using spontaneous medical language (technical-scientific)

2 Drafts are processed from the health librarians with an expertise in communication with patients

3 Adapted drafts are confirmed by a scientific committee and by the authors

Authors are physicians or HCPs of our Institute, experts on the topic. Health librarians are experts on language review process and plain language rules [6]. The Scientific Commettee is made up of 2 oncologists and an oncology academic scientist, from School of Medical Oncology, University of Udine.

The videos are performed and edited by a professionist, graphics plainness is evaluated as well.

A questionnaire will be administered to physicians and HCPs writing drafts for videos asking their experience in turning their technical/scientific language into simple language.

Results/ Evaluation

The first set of videos is expected to be online by April 2022 and qualitative data from physicians and HCPs participating to the project will be available.

Conclusion

We expect such a training would improve communication skills in everyday practice with patients among physicians and other HCPs. The success of videos viewing and sharing possibly will involve other physicians/HCPs to adopt proper communication skills.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Our project is expected to improve patient-physicians information and communication.

[1] Hirono I., Health literacy and health communication, BioPsycoSocial Medicine 2010, 4:18

[2] Kelly T., Radiation therapist health literacy training: Does lerning alternate communication methods translate into improved confidence in patient interactions?, Radiography 2020, 26:220-226

[3] Moore PM, Communication skills training for healthcare professionals working with people who have cancer, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2018, 7

[4] Cipolat Mis C., CROinforma Patient Education Handouts: Health librarian as a key for a real co-production, EAHIL Poster 2017

[5] Truccolo I., Patient-centered cancer care programs in Italy: benchmarking global patient education initiatives, Journal of Cancer Education 2016, 31 405-412

[6] Mazzocut M., ETHIC: evaluation tool of health information consumers, Biblioteche Oggi 2014, 32, 10

Biography and Bibliography
Chiara Cipolat Mis and Emanuela Ferrarin are patients librarians and information specialists. Chiara has a degree in Philosophy, Emanuela has a degree in Pharmacy. Both are involved in Patient Education & Empowerment Program and coordinators of patient information leaflets series named CROinforma (https://www.cro.it/it/biblioteca/croinforma/).

•Mazzocut M., Cipolat Mis C., Ferrarin E., Gruarin N., Ciolfi L., Michilin N., De Paoli P., Franceschi S., Truccolo I. Embedding librarian skills in a Patient Education & Empowerment research project, from design to evaluation: a complete guide. EAHIL 2019 – Learn - Share - Act - Bridge Borders, Basel, 17-20 June, 2019. Poster Abstracts Eahil 2019
•Francescon S., Truccolo I, Bianchini C., Cantù P., Ferrarin E., Cipolat Mis C., Michilin N., Ciolfi L., Mazzocut M. The librarian as an antidote: recognizing the misinformation online to improve the educational reference for patients. European Association for Health Information and Libraries (EAHIL) 12 – 16 June 2017 / Dublin Castle / Ireland
•Insieme ai pazienti. Costruire la patient education nelle strutture sanitarie. (Prospettive) a cura di Truccolo I., Cipolat Mis C., De Paoli P., Roma, Il pensiero scientifico, 2016: http://pensiero.it/catalogo/libri/insieme-ai-pazienti

Cipolat Mis-Youtube videos for improving literacy skills for cancer healthcare professionals and improve_a.pdf

Cipolat Mis-Youtube videos for improving literacy skills for cancer healthcare professionals and improve_b.doc

Cipolat Mis-Youtube videos for improving literacy skills for cancer healthcare professionals and improve_c.png
 
12:45pm - 1:45pmSIG - Evaluation and Metrics
Location: Van Beuningen
Session Chair: Alicia Fátima Gomez
12:45pm - 1:45pmVendor Workshops
Location: Schadee

12.45-13.15 Wolters Kluwer: Ovid has expert solutions to support your institutions medical research including systematic reviews and education programs. - Connie Munsters, Manager, Account/Relationship Management

13.20-13.30 Elsevier : EMPOWER: Your skills to make healthcare truly inclusive

1:45pm - 3:30pm4.1: Oral Presentations - Everything Interesting
Location: Van Beuningen
Session Chair: Helge Knüttel
 
1:45pm - 2:00pm
ID: 124 / 4.1: 1
Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

Unexpected readings: looking for beauty in books at the Hospice of Padua (Italy).

Giuliana Prevedello, Marianna Gnoato, Valentina Bozzato

Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padua, Italy

Introduction

Books can contribute to the well-being of a person: they have a therapeutic potential and a positive effect, limiting the sense of isolation that patients and the healthcare staff may feel during hospitalization, and nurturing a sense of connection, empathy and being in the present. The Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV-IRCCS) is the first and only Institute in the Veneto region (Italy) specifically dedicated to cancer research and the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The Institute has offices, laboratories and hospitals located in three different cities in the region; in the latter, the new Hospice was inaugurated in 2020: a structure with six bedrooms that welcomes patients in an advanced stage of oncological disease.

Aim

With the purpose of improving the quality of life and making the Hospice a more reassuring and less impersonal place, the IOV scientific library has designed a pilot project called “Letture inattese” (Unexpected readings) that brings novels, short stories, poetry, graphic novels and illustrated books to guests, carers and the health workforce of the Hospice.

Method

People that wish to participate do not choose a book, but a topic of interest between the themes that we have developed, and receive a closed fabric bag with 5 unexpected books. The themes that people can choose from are: The stars, the universe and everything else; Chlorophyll and oxygen: animals and plants; Coloured and black and white images; Intertwining: stories and adventurous encounters; Back and forth: wandering the world.

By delivering the books in closed bags, we act in compliance with the anti Covid-19 regulations (once returned and before being loaned to patients, all books will be isolated and subjected to the quarantine procedure, according to official guidelines) and we offer a moment of surprise that breaks with the Hospice everyday routine.

Results
The books that conform this first patients’ library (about 50 titles for each theme) were selected by the IOV librarians in collaboration with Hospice staff, local booksellers and friends, based on these criteria: long readings and heavy books were excluded as well as all material regarding oncology or health related issues; we chose easy to hold and leaf through books and adventurous stories to read. A small collection of illustrated books for children that visit their loved ones was also included.
Conclusion

This project lays the foundations for the creation of a network that connects the hospital and the cultural veneto community: through this project we have launched a collaboration with two independent bookstores in the region and we envision new connections growing from the seeds of this first patients’ library at IOV.

Human Touch

With the people in mind, rather than their illness, our way of approaching the project aimed at the creation of a moment of wonderment, relief and leise through the beauty that can be found in books. This new library creates opportunities for deepening the quality of human relationships between the patients, their families and healthcare professionals via a humanistic perspective on palliative care.

Biography and Bibliography
The scientific library at IOV is dedicated to the management of scientific documentation, access to databases and promotion of publications in specialized journals, as well as supporting the researchers in their studies and the pubblication process of their scientific results. We are a multidisciplinary team with different backgrounds, in science, communication and art history. Our personal approach to the scientific library encompasses the humanistic side of healthcare.
Recent pubblication:
https://doi.org/10.4081/itjm.2021.1473


2:00pm - 2:15pm
ID: 132 / 4.1: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

Position Descriptions for Leaders in Health Sciences Libraries, Medicine, Nursing, and Health Administration: Exploring Leadership Competencies as Reflected in Practice

Nicole Capdarest-Arest1, Jamie M. Gray2

1University of California, Davis, United States of America; 2Weill Cornell Medicine - Qatar

Introduction
Building effective interprofessional relationships is now a requirement of the modern health sciences library leader. Demonstrating leadership competencies recognized in health sciences librarianship as well as in adjacent professions positions library leaders to better connect the role of the library and forge future-looking partnerships. A position description (“PD”) defines employee areas of responsibility and requirements and, ideally, should reflect current standards of practice. As such, PDs are often a means through which professional standards are linked to operational practice. As standards of leadership are increasingly being integrated into competencies for health sciences professions (including health sciences librarianship), evaluating which competencies are being reflected in PDs should provide insight into how such requirements are being put into practice in the real world.
Aim
This presentation describes how PDs for health sciences library leaders and those in medicine, nursing, and healthcare administration align in relationship to identified standards, as reflected in the multidisciplinary Healthcare Leadership Alliance (HLA) competency framework.
Method/ Program Description
Twenty PDs (5 each in the areas of leadership/management in health sciences librarianship, healthcare administration, medicine, and nursing) were obtained by searching The Chronicle of Higher Education Jobs and HigherEdJobs web portals in October - November 2021. An additional review of the MLA career page was conducted to complete the set of library postings. Five PDs mentioning leadership or management were selected randomly in each profession, and then each PD was analyzed for keyword congruence with the HLA competency framework using all 43 predefined keywords.
Results/ Evaluation
Preliminary results show that across all PDs evaluated, the top 5 most commonly addressed HLA keywords were: leadership, nursing, staff, management, and community. HLA keywords that were not mentioned at all across all four professions were: reimbursement, self awareness, and theory. In health sciences librarianship PDs evaluated, the most frequently used HLA keywords were: diversity, staff, information systems, and technology. Results indicate that PDs reflect alignment with many competencies for leadership in health-related professions, including health sciences librarianship, with an average of 32.25 of 43 HLA leadership competencies. Hospital administration position descriptions on average addressed the most HLA keywords (n=36), followed by medicine (n=34), nursing (n=31) and health sciences librarianship (n=28). More results will be evaluated and discussed at the EAHIL 2022 conference.
Conclusion

This lesser congruence with HLA keyword representation in the set of PDs for health sciences librarianship might present an opportunity to consider and include leadership competencies that resonate more with health professions colleagues that we intersect with daily in PDs for librarian roles. For health sciences librarians in leadership positions, or for any health sciences librarians working with interprofessional leaders, emphasizing and practicing cross-disciplinary leadership skills could demonstrate alignment and shared values across the professions. Many of the HLA keywords reflect skills that can be readily acquired by health sciences librarians via continuing education and participation in conferences (such as EAHIL) that provide learning opportunities around these skills.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Incorporating language and skills from adjacent health-oriented professions can be beneficial to librarians to better connect with colleagues in these fields.

Biography and Bibliography
Nicole Capdarest-Arest, MA(LIS), AHIP, as Head of the Blaisdell Medical Library at UC Davis, spearheads biomedical library initiatives and partners on research, education and clinical care with faculty, staff and students in the UC Davis School of Medicine, Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, Clinical and Translational Science Center, UC Davis Health, and the affiliated research centers and institutes. Her special areas of focus include leadership, design thinking, program development, instructional design, and optimizing quality information retrieval processes.

Jamie M. Gray, MLS, MS, AHIP is the Director of the Distributed eLibrary at Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar. Previously, she served as part of the library leadership team at both Stanford School of Medicine’s Lane Medical Library and the University of Washington Health Sciences Library. Her professional interests are varied and include inter-professional leadership, evidence-based practice, and the library’s role in helping to address the social determinants of health.

Jamie and Nicole have presented previously to EAHIL and other conferences on leadership in health sciences librarianship. They have also published on this topic: Capdarest-Arest, N., & Gray, J. M. (2020). Health sciences library leadership skills in an interprofessional landscape: a review and textual analysis. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA, 108(4), 547.


2:15pm - 2:30pm
ID: 179 / 4.1: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

Knowledge Management and the Digital Transformation for the Health Sector: Framework Development

Eliane Pereira dos Santos, Sebastian Garcia-Saiso, Marcelo D'Agostino, Blessing Mawire

Pan American Health Organization, United States of America

Introduction
The potential of digital technologies for increasing access to communities with health vulnerabilities is huge. However, such communities normally have the least access to connectivity, which exacerbates increased exclusions, inequalities, and the digital divide. It is key that Digital Transformation in the health sector be done with an aim for equitable access, especially during a global pandemic such as the current COVID-19 pandemic. This extends to Digital Transformation in Knowledge Management for the Health Sector.

Aim

The Organization is leading regional efforts to accelerate the digital transformation of the health sector to provide better, more equitable, and advanced healthcare. A set of eight principles have been developed to help understand the focus areas of this digital transformation in the health sector. Knowledge Management in the organization has proposed a strategic alignment to these principles to respond to current and future needs.
Method/ Program Description
The development of our organization’s Knowledge Management Framework for Digital Transformation for the Health Sector aims to position Knowledge Management at the centre of transformative efforts and involves processes that build upon each other to enable triangulation, participatory engagements, buy-in and implementation.

This seven-step process includes literature review, knowledge exchange initiatives, review of internal key reports and frameworks, contextualization, model development, proof of concept development, deployment, and refinement, embedding technical units, and future validation among representatives of our countries and territories.

Results/ Evaluation

By November 2021, we implemented the fifth step of the framework by organizing the first write workshop that gathered experts from various organization worldwide and with different backgrounds (technical expertise and from different geographic and language perspectives).

From this virtual event we were able to move forward with the position paper being prepared which, for each principal of the Digital Transformation, brings a situation analysis, a list of successful initiatives, recommendations for the implementation on the knowledge management and access to information perspectives.

Experts also provided feedback for the next workshops and seminars to be organized either with other experts or official representatives of countries and territories who will finally validate the framework.
Conclusion

Despite of the unprecedent challenges brought by COVID-19 especially for the Public Sector worldwide, it has also brought a remarkable opportunity to re-position and strengthen the field of Knowledge Management and Access to Information in Health in the global effort of independency, interoperability, equity on access to information and leaving no one behind.
Human Touch

This initiative is aligned with the fundamentals of the Universal Health Coverage by leaving no one behind – especially in the context of reducing the inequalities of access to information. At same time it is a contribution to many global initiatives that embrace the digital literacy and interconnectivity.

Biography and Bibliography
Eliane Pereira dos Santos is the Regional Advisor on Knowledge Management and Networks in the Department of Evidence and Intelligence for Action in Health at the Pan American Health Organization since 2011, where she leads the Knowledge Management Project Team, responsible for (and among others) to the PAHO’s Institutional Knowledge/Digital Library, the PAHO/WHO Collaborating Centers in the Americas and the Pan American Journal of Public Health. She is the regional focal point (Americas) for WHO Global Initiatives as the Research4Life Program. She holds a Masters’ degree in Information Science with concentration focus on Knowledge Management (University of Brasilia, Brazil). She also holds a BA in Strategic Management of Public Health (UNICAMP, Brazil) and another on Business Intelligence. She also has experience on country focus as, before joining PAHO Headquarters, she was the General-Coordinator of Documentation and Information (CGDI) in Ministry of Health Brazil (2010-2011).


2:30pm - 2:45pm
ID: 182 / 4.1: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

Librarian in future: Professional Requirements from Norwegian Employers

Therese Skagen1, Irene Hunskår2, Regina Küfner Lein3

1Western University of Applied Sciences, Norway; 2VID Specialized University; 3University of Bergen

Introduction

“Competencies for the librarian in future” is a project about professional requirements for librarians in academic and research libraries in Norway. The libraries are continually developing new areas for services, like systematic literature review or research data services. In this project we will elaborate on the competencies needed for employees in research and academic libraries especially within medicine and the health sciences.

Aim

In this study we analyse job advertisements for librarians in academic and research libraries in <our country>. Which competencies and skills do employers in research and academic libraries express in job advertisements?

Method/ Program Description

A document analysis of published job advertisements in academic and research libraries for 18 months (January 2020-June 2021) was performed. Our data include all job advertisements from both private and public sector in Norway, which are reported to Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration, [NAV].

Two reviewers screened independently 3285 published job advertisements for librarians. Based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, 272 job advertisements were selected for data extraction. The data was categorised into work tasks, formal and informal qualifications, or personal skills.

Results/ Evaluation

The analysis shows the professional requirements stated by employers in academic and research libraries. Preliminary results imply that training as a librarian/information specialist is the most sought-after formal requirement. Teaching and tutoring in information literacy, information searching, and reference skills are the tasks mentioned most often, together with front desk/first line services. New services like research data management, bibliometrics and systematic literature review constitutes a smaller proportion of the job advertisements.

Further, personal skills highlighted are communication skills, being able to show initiative, flexibility and being both a team worker and being able to work independently. Previous experience from academic or research libraries or similar work tasks is highly appreciated.

Conclusion

This study about professional demands for employees in academic and research libraries in Norway, gives insight about employers' expectations and librarians’ needs for competencies. Analysis of job advertisements contributes to the knowledge of formal qualifications, experiences and job-related skills, and personal skills expected. The preferred librarian seems to be an experiences employee with allrounder capabilities to perform at a range of work tasks. This gives little room for newly educated librarians to be employed.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This study can inform providers of education services about the professional skills required from employees in academic and research libraries. Thus, enabling education services’ providers to develop relevant educational offers or tailored continuing educational courses in the medical and health librarian profession. To focus on education and professional competencies, will still be important in the future, as librarians are the most valuable human resource in academic and research libraries.



2:45pm - 3:00pm
ID: 185 / 4.1: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

Advancing the ‘art’ of horizon scanning for innovative health technologies

Sonia Garcia Gonzalez-Moral, Catherine Richmond, Claire Eastaugh, Sheila Wallace, Fiona Beyer

NIHR Innovation Observatory, Newcastle University, UK, United Kingdom

Introduction

In the last two decades, horizon-scanning has emerged as a critical tool for the purpose of early identification of signals relevant to decision makers. In the context of healthcare and health services research, these signals may be considered as health technologies. As such, horizon-scanning has been acknowledged as an integral part of the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) process, the process by which evidence on the clinical effectiveness and the costs and benefits of transferring the technology into clinical practice are systematically evaluated and appropriate recommendations made. A new health technology may be a new medicine, device, diagnostic or digital intervention.

Horizon-scanning methods, understood as the systematic examination of signals to identify early signs of important developments, lay their foundations on advanced searching and information retrieval processes. In this regard, one can observe similarities with information retrieval methods employed in systematic reviews. However, whilst systematic reviews transparently report the information searching and selection of studies, horizon-scanning methodologies are not consistently reported in the literature nor are there standards for the reporting or undertaking of this task. Important strategic decisions are made based on horizon-scanning activities, which are complex and time-consuming, requiring a multidisciplinary team for the identification, interpretation, and filtration of the identified signals as well as highly developed technological tools to support the processing and management of knowledge and its dissemination in a timely manner.

Aim
We will present the results of a literature review in horizon-scanning and forecasting methodologies used for the identification of innovative medical health technologies used to support health care decision-making.

Method/ Program Description
This presentation will broadly introduce horizon-scanning methods used for identification of innovative health technologies. Following, we will outline some the identified challenges when horizon-scanning for medical health technologies (medical devices, digital applications and diagnostics) and present a rationale for why horizon-scanning methods need to adapt to the type of health technologies in scope.

Results/ Evaluation
Presentation of the literature review results in line with the review search questions:

What horizon-scanning or forecasting methods are used for the identification of innovative medical health technologies?

Conclusion

- horizon-scanning and forecasting methods used to identify medical health technologies are heterogenous and often used in combination;

- methods are commonly not robustly reported in the literature;

- there is lack of consensus in the use of terminology;

- greater standardarisation of methods reporting will contribute towards efficient retrieval.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Information specialists and medical librarians are highly specialized profesionals with a wealth of collective knowledge and expertise. Used to sharing skills and knowledge to advance information science and support other profesionals fulfill their research or clinical needs.

Biography and Bibliography
Sonia works as Research Associate (Information Specialist) at the National Institute for Health Research Innovation Observatory (NIHR IO) hosted by the Population Health Sciences Institute at Newcastle University. At the NIHR IO she co-leads a team of horizon scanning analysts specialised in medicines horizon scanning for a number of UK stakeholders. She collaborates across multiple programmes as the NIHR IO on horizon scanning, identification and data retrieval methods development. Additionally, she contributes as information specialist to externally funded projects such as the Technology Appraisal Review groups that feed into the NICE TA programme for medicines. She is a seasoned information specialist with experience conducting systematic reviews both as reviewer and information specialist. She holds a Bachelor (Hons) in Information Science and a MSc in Applied Health Research Methods. She is currently undertaking a part-time PhD on horizon scanning methods for the identification of innovative medical technologies.

- Gonzalez-Moral SG, Al-Assaf A, Pandey S, Ogunbayo O, Craig D. OP218 Searching Preprint Repositories For COVID-19 Therapeutics Using A Semi-Automated Text-Mining Tool. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care. [Online] Cambridge University Press; 2021;37(S1): 6–6. Available from: doi:10.1017/S0266462321000799
- The Imagine Series: what’s next for research in dementia with Lewy bodies? The carer perspective. 25th Cochrane Colloquium. Edinburgh. UK
- The Imagine Series: a knowledge exchange model merging global research evidence with patient and carer insight to help shape the future. 25th Cochrane Colloquium. Edinburgh. UK
- Khan SK, Moral SGG, Ogunbayo D, Craig D. OP484 Analysis Of Horizon Scanning Outputs For The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Health Technology Assessment Process. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care. [Online] Cambridge University Press; 2020;36(S1): 10–11. Available from: doi:10.1017/S0266462320001142
- Arber M, Garcia S, Veale T, Edwards M, Shaw A, Glanville JM. PERFORMANCE OF OVID MEDLINE SEARCH FILTERS TO IDENTIFY HEALTH STATE UTILITY STUDIES. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care. [Online] Cambridge University Press; 2017;33(4): 472–480. Available from: doi:10.1017/S0266462317000897
- Arber M, Garcia S, Veale T, Edwards M, Shaw A, Glanville J. Performance of Search Filters to Identify Health State Utility Studies. Value in Health. 2016 Nov 1;19(7):A390-1.
- O’Connor, S., Hanlon, P., O’Donnell, C.A. et al. Understanding factors affecting patient and public engagement and recruitment to digital health interventions: a systematic review of qualitative studies. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak 16, 120 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12911-016-0359-3
- O'Connor S, Hanlon P, O'Donnell CA, et alBarriers and facilitators to patient and public engagement and recruitment to digital health interventions: protocol of a systematic review of qualitative studies. BMJ Open 2016;6:e010895. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010895


3:00pm - 3:15pm
ID: 188 / 4.1: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

Library and publishing – cooperation, involvement, challenges

Magdalena Maria Kokosinska

Medical University of Lodz, Poland

Introduction
November 2020 marks a new publishing initiative at our university - a publishing series UMedical Reports (UMR). It is an organ of the Publishing House of the Medical University of Lodz, Poland serving the purpose of Open Access publication of original monographs, authored or edited, in Polish or English. The publications have an electronic form and are published in the CYBRA Lodz Regional Digital Library. The subject matter falls within the scientific disciplines of pharmaceutical sciences, medical sciences, and health sciences.

Two librarians from The Library and Information Center of the Medical University of Lodz were actively involved in the creation of UMR from the beginning (April 2020), and their functions were expanded over time: from editorial assistant and graphic designer to editor and language proofreader, the person coordinating much of the publishing processes, and compositor. Later, a third person also joined.

Aim
The series was created as a forum for exchanging thoughts and experiences of scientists and health care professionals, doctoral students, and students, as well as for presenting and summarizing achievements, the current state of knowledge, and prospects for the development of the above-mentioned disciplines.
Method/ Program Description

The librarians’ involvement in this project stemmed from an awareness of the knowledge and experience of someone working with publishers of various types. The job presents many challenges: the need to be well organized, to balance library and publishing responsibilities, to establish and maintain good relationships with authors, and to be able to make demands in a way that is both firm and also polite. We collaborate with the library's bibliography and bibliometrics department, university translators, the university's promotion and marketing department, IT specialists, the national library (ISBN and legal deposit), and external reviewers.

Results/ Evaluation
By the end of 2021, we had published 18 monographs – three authored monographs are written entirely in English, several chapters in edited monographs are also in English. All monographs are peer-reviewed by 2 external reviewers (single-blind peer review).
Conclusion

Through involvement in the new publishing initiative, the perception of the library by some academics has changed for the better. The number of contacts between researchers and the library has increased.

The biggest benefits are: raising awareness among researchers about the role of the academic library, the opportunity to participate in an interesting initiative related to the dissemination of scientific work and achievements of the university, gaining a better understanding of the scholarly publishing process. Contacts with scientists are not always easy, but such challenges teach us a lot. The support of our supervisor and professor, who is the editor-in-chief, is also very important. For us as librarians, this is a great opportunity for our own growth - to expand our knowledge, develop our skills, and gain additional experience in a new area.

Human Touch (Recommended)

A partnership and cooperative approach is the basis of our work. Without them, and without a mutual understanding between author and librarian/publisher, the work would be much more difficult.



3:15pm - 3:30pm
ID: 158 / 4.1: 7
Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

Library and communication skills for the sake of scientific heritage and health promotion: new spaces, new opportunities at the Italian National Institute of Health

Paola De Castro, Federica Napolitani, Elisabetta Poltronieri

Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy

Introduction

Nobody could deny that library and communication skills are a precious support to scientific research; perhaps the use of such skills to support initiatives in the area of cultural and historical heritage in a research environment is less frequent and could be optimised to promote health within an historical –cultural framework.

Aim

This poster reports about an ongoing project for the Promotion of the historical, artistic and cultural heritage of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (the Italian National Institute of Health, ISS). The objective is to describe the activities carried out within this ISS Project and to show how similar initiatives in the areas of history and art could help to engage different stakeholders like policymakers, citizens and students for the promotion of public health.

Program Description
The opening of the ISS Museum was an important part of the Project. The Museum was inaugurated in 2017 with the intent to preserve the history of the main Italian institute of research and to promote healthy behaviour among the population (an area in the Museum is dedicated to temporary exhibitions and is now devoted to the COVID-19 pandemic). ISS has recently set up a website (https://arch.iss.it) collecting images pertaining to ancient (over 16,000 digitised photographs) about and current collections of multimedial material produced for institutional purposes throughout the years, back from early '30 of the XX century. A collection of over 1000 scientific instruments and of about 100 objects (statues, paintings etc) of artistic interest is also part of the ISS heritage, as described in the poster.

Results/ Evaluation
The use of the historical heritage of an scientific research institute can be a useful tool to disseminate health research, promote healthy behaviours, and build new collaborating networks not only among scientists, but among young researchers, students, citizens and people involved in historical and artistic practices.

Conclusion

Putting together library and communication skills is a great opportunity to boost both the library resources and the visibility of the institution in different national and international contexts outside the scientific arena. At the same time, an enlightened vision providing new space for culture is a key asset for staff wellbeing and internal cohesion.

Human Touch

The activities related to this Project have proved to increase a positive attitude and to bring a sense of contentment to all people involved.

Biography and Bibliography
Paola De Castro. Director of the Scientific Communication Unit at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), the National Institute of Health in Italy (www.iss.it). She develops and implements strategies to support science communication at different levels, including the management of ISS publications (journals, technical reports, newsletters, and others) and the organisation of events addressed to different stakeholders. She participates in multidisciplinary research and training for public health, mainly focused on science communication, health equity, health literacy, and scientific writing, with research partnerships in Europe, Latin America, and Africa. She is also Director if the ISS Interactive Museum for Public Health and, more recently of the ISS Scientific Library providing access to over 20 thousand scientific journals and the most relevand biomedical databases. Such activities provide a wider vision of science communication and allow to create links and connections with different research groups and stakeholders.

De Castro P, Salinetti S, Barbaro MC, et al. Information specialists and researchers working together for health promotion: Benefits from school-work educational programmes at the National Institute of Health in Italy. Health Info Libr J. 2021;00:1–5. https://doi.org/10.1111/hir.12375 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/hir.12375

Bertinato L, Brambilla G, De Castro P, et al How can we manage the COVID-19 infodemics? A case study targeted to health workers in Italy. Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità 2021;57(2):121-127. https://www.iss.it/documents/20126/0/ANN_21_02_02.pdf https://www.iss.it/documents/20126/0/ANN_21_02_02.pdf

Bucciardini, R., Contoli, B., De Castro, P. et al. The health equity in all policies (HEiAP) approach before and beyond the Covid-19 pandemic in the Italian context. Int J Equity Health 2020;19, 92. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12939-020-01209-0
https://equityhealthj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12939-020-01209-0

De Castro P, et al. Training for community health workers: the first step towards a model of community antiretroviral therapy delivery. African Journal of social work. 2019, n. 2
https://www.ajol.info/index.php/ajsw/article/view/192187
 
1:45pm - 3:30pm4.2: Oral Presentations - Information Retrieval (2)
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Louise Farragher
 
1:45pm - 2:00pm
ID: 136 / 4.2: 1
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Evaluating search strategies used to identify systematic reviews and RCTs for an evidence gap map

Naomi Shaw, Alison Bethel

University of Exeter, United Kingdom

Introduction

Search methods for systematic reviews and other evidence syntheses should be transparent, reproducible and comprehensive. The PRISMA-S checklist requires full search strategies are reported for each bibliographic database, however, these do not provide any indication of the efficiency of the search strategy, or the usefulness of individual search lines for identifying studies for inclusion.

It is becoming increasingly important to evaluate search strategies for evidence syntheses, particularly for those that require regular updates or for ‘living’ reviews, to ensure search strategies are effective and efficient, and to minimise future screening load.
Aim

To identify a simple method for search strategy evaluation and consider how Information Specialists (ISs) can report and share search strategy evaluations.

Method

Searches were conducted to identify systematic reviews (SRs), randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and economic evaluations for an evidence gap map on peer support interventions. Search strategies included a combination of free-text and controlled vocabulary terms.

A search summary table was created to highlight where included studies were found. This indicated 27 of the 32 included SRs, and 50 of the 61 included RCTs were retrieved by the original Ovid MEDLINE searches.

Test sets were created for included references using PubMed identifiers in Ovid MEDLINE. These were used to evaluate each line of the SR and RCT topic search strategies, in order to identify the lines of the search strategy that retrieved included or unique references, and the simplest combination of search terms that would retrieve all included references.
Results

Initial findings indicate that a simple strategy (using only two search lines) would identify all included SRs, whereas a broader range of terminology (12 search lines) is needed to capture all included RCTs. 18 search lines in the peer support strategy for SRs retrieved at least one included SR. 26 search lines in the RCT search strategy picked up at least one included RCT.

We will present further findings from our evaluation of search strategies conducted for an evidence map.
Conclusion

The conduct and reporting of a search strategy evaluation, in addition to a search summary table, may improve search efficiency and minimise screening load for reviews that require frequent updates. These can be time-consuming tasks, however, search strategy evaluation provides opportunities for ISs to reflect on current practice and gather evidence about the value of different search approaches. Reporting details of search strategy evaluation ensures transparency and reproducibility of search methods, and may also guide ISs working on similar topics to make informed decisions about selection of search terms. The IS community could work together to develop simple and effective methods to evaluate search strategies and consider how this knowledge can best be shared.

The authors intend to conduct further research comparing the performance of ‘evaluated’ search strategies with our original search strategies. We will assess the efficiency and number needed to screen for both strategies to inform updates of the living evidence map of peer support interventions.



2:00pm - 2:15pm
ID: 120 / 4.2: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Reducing systematic review burden using Deduklick: a novel, automated, reliable, and explainable deduplication algorithm

Nikolay Borissov1,2, Quentin Haas1,2, Beatrice Minder3, Doris Kopp-Heim3, Marc von Gernler4, Heidrun Janka4, Douglas Teodoro5,6, Poorya Amini1,2

1Risklick AG, Spin-off University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 2CTU Bern, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 3Public Health & Primary Care Library, University Library of Bern, University of Bern, Switzerland; 44 Medical Library, University Library of Bern, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 5University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland, Geneva, Switzerland; 6Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

ABSTRACT

Background

Identifying and removing reference duplicates when conducting systematic reviews (SRs) remains a major, time-consuming issue for authors who manually check for duplicates using built-in features in citation managers. To address issues related to manual deduplication, we developed an automated, efficient, and rapid artificial intelligence (AI)-based algorithm named Deduklick. Deduklick combines natural language processing (NLP) algorithms with a set of rules created by expert information specialists.

Methods

Deduklick’s deduplication uses a multistep algorithm of data normalization, calculated a similarity score, and identified unique and duplicate references based on metadata fields, such as title, authors, journal, DOI, year, issue, volume, and pages. We measured and compared Deduklick’s capacity to accurately detect duplicates with the information specialists’ standard, manual duplicate removal process using EndNote on eight heterogeneous datasets. Using a sensitivity analysis, the efficiency and noise of both methods were manually cross-compared.

Findings

Following deduplication and comparing performance measurements, Deduklick achieved an average recall of 99·51%, an average precision of 100·00%, and average F1 score of 99·75%. In contrast, the manual deduplication process achieved an average recall of 88·65%, an average precision of 99·95%, and an average F1 Score of 91·98%. Deduklick achieved equal to higher expert-level performance on duplicate removal. It also preserved a high metadata quality, and drastically diminished the time spent on analysis.

Interpretation

Deduklick represents an efficient, transparent, ergonomic, and time-saving solution for searching and removing duplicates in SRs. Deduklick could therefore simplify SRs production and represent important advantages for scientists, including saving time, increasing accuracy, reducing costs, and contributing to quality SRs.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Automated, Reliable and Explainable Deduplication of trials and publications metadata, part of systematic review process.



2:15pm - 2:30pm
ID: 133 / 4.2: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Using Quality Improvement methodology to investigate the impact of reference management software and search interfaces on literature searches

Lindsay Snell, Lisa Lawrence, Suzanne Toft

University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom

Introduction

Literature searches to answer clinical and management questions can be time consuming. Our Library and Knowledge Service (LKS) provides 300-400 searches annually: a substantial time investment. Quality Improvement (QI) methodology is a recognised way to address inefficiencies and improve processes. Our organisation recently introduced revised QI practices. The LKS is one team chosen to pilot the new approach. The LKS literature searchers decided to use QI methodology to investigate improvements to the search process.

Aim

To investigate whether the time taken to provide a literature search could be reduced without any impact on quality.

Method

At baseline, we timed the different stages of searches (e.g. correspondence with colleagues/users; searching; peer review; sifting; summarising). As recommended by a QI specialist, we aimed to record data for about 20 searches per searcher per Plan/Do/Study/Act cycle: a large amount of data for a QI project. However, we were advised this was needed given the large variation in complexity of search questions and the time taken to complete them. We have completed 3 Cycles: (1) Introducing reference management software (RMS) and increasing the number of interfaces searched; (2) Returning to a single interface while using RMS; (3) Sharing experiences of RMS to streamline processes (single interface). All other activities which contribute to search quality (e.g. number of databases searched) remained unchanged.

Results

Cycle 1 (presented elsewhere) demonstrated that using RMS offset the increased time taken to search multiple interfaces. Time spent searching databases increased, whilst time was saved on formatting and sifting. We anticipated time savings in Cycle 2 (return to single interface; continued use of RMS). We were surprised this was not the case. In Cycle 2, across all searchers, there was an average time saving of only 2 minutes per search compared to baseline. On investigating, we found considerably differing results for each searcher. This varied from an average increase per search of 139 minutes to an average time saving per search of 62 minutes. Reasons for variation, including human factors, search complexity, and the way individuals’ search processes changed through the cycles, will be discussed. Note: Data collection for cycle 3 will be completed in March 2022, and presented at EAHIL.

Conclusion

This QI project enabled us to demonstrate and understand time savings created by changes to our workflows. It gave us a deeper understanding of search processes and personal variations in technique. Recommendations: (1) Use of QI methodology to evaluate and improve search processes, and understand the impact of changes between database platforms; (2) Use of RMS to streamline literature search delivery.

Human Touch

Our results were unexpected, although we are experienced searchers and had anticipated certain outcomes. This highlights the benefit of QI methodology for improving processes, and the need to question assumptions, even about familiar practices. We would recommend this questioning approach to other Library services to re-evaluate established procedures. It has been professionally rewarding to compare and evaluate our approaches to literature searching. This comparison has allowed us to improve our own practice.

Biography and Bibliography
Cycle 1 of this project was presented as: Snell, L, Lawrence, L, and Toft, S. Providing literature searches more efficiently: using quality improvement methods to save time without losing quality. Paper presented at: International Clinical Librarian Conference ICLCLite; 2021 Nov 11. http://www.uhl-library.nhs.uk/iclc/2021programme.pdf

Lindsay Snell, Lisa Lawrence, and Suzanne Toft are Clinical Librarians with substantial experience in embedded roles in the English NHS. They have presented previously at the International Clinical Librarian Conference and the UK Health Libraries Group Conference. Lindsay Snell and Lisa Lawrence have presented jointly on creating and developing clinical librarian services, and on the impact of these services. Lindsay has presented on clinical librarianship to support Quality Improvement and integrated care. Lisa has presented on clinical librarianship in Dermatology and Tuberculosis services. Suzanne Toft has presented on providing critical appraisal training to patients.


2:30pm - 2:45pm
ID: 184 / 4.2: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Users' expectations and preferences regarding machine learning tools for title and abstract selections in practice

Miriam Maria van der Maten1,2

1Knowledge Institute of the Dutch Association of Medical Specialists, Netherlands, The; 2Cochrane Netherlands, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, the Netherlands

Introduction
Title and abstracts selections form the basis for systematic evidence syntheses which are vital for evidence-based medicine. They are time consuming to perform, but the ever-growing body of scientific literature plus the demand for faster up to date information make the current selection process unsustainable. Machine learning-based screening tools have been suggested as a solution to accelerate the process, but large-scale application in practice stays off. A gap in knowledge about users' expectations and preferences may partially explain this low uptake.
Aim
To create insight in users' expectations and preferences regarding machine learning tools for title and abstract selection to better align tool development and usage in practice.

Method/ Program Description
We use a clinical guideline development setting to derive the expectations and preferences of potential title and abstract tool users. First insights were collected through a survey among guideline developers and clinical specialists. More in-depth expectations were collected through focus groups with guideline developers and clinical specialists.
Results/ Evaluation
The survey was distributed among 335 guideline developers and clinical specialists. 88 responses were obtained of which 79 survey responses could be used for the analysis. Seven guideline developers and 5 clinical specialists were recruited respectively for two separate focus groups. Data is currently being analysed and results will be available at the conference.
Conclusion
As a result of this study, we will provide an overview of users' expectations and preferences regarding machine learning tools for title and abstract selections.



2:45pm - 3:00pm
ID: 175 / 4.2: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Development and validation of a database filter for study size

Sabrina Gunput, Wichor Bramer

Erasmus MC, Netherlands, The

Introduction
Researchers performing systematic reviews often express the desire to limit the search results to a certain study size: "I want to include only studies of more than 100 patients". While we of course can discuss about the validity of such a request, limiting the search results to match the inclusion criteria can reduce the burden of screening for reviewers.

Aim
The aim of our study was to develop a filter in embase.com and Medline Ovid to retrieve references above a certain threshhold of sample size. We compared the effectivenss of our filter in development using existing systematic reviews that report using sample size as an inclusion criteria.

Method/ Program Description
Together with researchers who expressed the desire to limit search results to a certain number of patients we constructed preliminary filters which were tested on the spot by evaluating the patient numbers of relevant references that had not been retrieved. If the patient numbers matched the inclusion criteria, the filter was adapted to retrieve the missed articles. After several rounds of improvement of the filter the filter was then tested against existing systematic reviews that used sample size as inclusion criteria but did not limit their search to a sample size.

Results/ Evaluation

The filter that was developed consists mainly of truncated numbers in proximity with words such as patients, cases, adults, females etc and phrase like "n=". The filter can and should be adapted to the research topic by combining these truncated numbers with specific terms for diseases, interventions or body parts of interest such as melanomas, surgeries, eyes or knees. The sensitivity of the filter as evaluated on existing systematic reviews was at least 94%. The references that were not retrieved were older articles that did not include the study size in their abstract.

Conclusion

The study size filter is a good way to limit search results to a certain number of patients. It is not 100% sensitive, but few filters are. Current guidelines for abstract formats advice authors to include in their abstract the number of patients in their research. We therefore expect the sensitivity of the filters only to improve for newer studies. A limitation is that the filters are only available in the interfaces of embase.com and Ovid and cannot be translated into PubMed, as the filter uses proximity operators which are not available in PubMed.

Human Touch (Recommended)

With the study size filter the burden of screening for systematic reviews can be greatly reduced.



3:00pm - 3:15pm
ID: 131 / 4.2: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Going beyond the traditional roles: Importance of partnership working

Mala Mann1, Rhiannon Cordiner1, Annmarie Nelson2, Anthony Byrne2

1Specialist Unit for Review Evidence, Cardiff University, Wales; 2Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Centre (MCPCRC), School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Wales

Introduction

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) has expanded the role of the librarian beyond identification of the literature only, to be involved in other stages of the evidence review process.
Aim

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the role of the librarian in conducting evidence synthesis in partnership with clinicians, health care workers, researchers, and policy makers. We will examine a series of rapid reviews conducted during the last five years to support professionals and other decision-makers working in palliative care.
Method

The literature searches were conducted across a range of databases and supplementary sources. In addition to designing and running the literature searches, other tasks included carrying out screening and study selection, developing data extraction forms and carrying out quality assessment of the eligible studies. Final tasks included synthesising evidence and writing the review using reporting templates in collaboration with researchers.
Results

To date, twelve reviews have been conducted using a methodology developed in partnership with the research team. Findings will be presented from the start of the process at the point of partnership working, to development of the review and subsequent follow up to demonstrate impact. The evidence from these reviews impacts directly on palliative care clinicians and other decision makers, and indirectly on patients/carers in receipt of palliative care.

Conclusion

Broadening horizons provides opportunities for information professionals in health care to play an invaluable role. Librarians can be effective partners in supporting researchers to practice evidence-based medicine.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Being integrated into a research team is an invaluable experience and contributing to other aspects of the review process can be rewarding. It provides opportunities to develop our expertise and remain relevant in an ever-changing world.

Biography and Bibliography
I am an Information Specialist/Systematic Reviewer based at Cardiff University's Specialist Unit for Review Evidence (SURE), with expertise in systematic reviewing for over 20 years. My particular expertise is in advanced literature searching and the development of systematic review methodologies. I have worked on projects for a range of organisations including the National Institute for Health & Care Excellence (NICE), National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) the Welsh Government and Public Health Wales. I have co-authored over 100 publications including Cochrane reviews and methodology papers. Current projects include conducting reviews for Cardiff University Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Centre, Wales COVID-19 Evidence Centre and the Centre for Homelessness Impact.
In addition, I teach evidence-based methodologies on several internal and external programmes including Cardiff University Doctoral Academy and lead the Cardiff Systematic Review Course. I have jointly supervised intercalated degree and postgraduate students who are involved in carrying out a systematic review as a component within their degree programme.

Bibliography

•Edwards, Deborah, Anstey, Sally, Coffey, Michael, Gill, Paul, Mann, Mala, Meudell, Alan and Hannigan, Ben 2021. End of life care for people with severe mental illness: Mixed methods systematic review and thematic synthesis (the MENLOC study). Palliative Medicine 35(10), pp. 1747-1760. (10.1177/02692163211037480)
•Harrop, Emily, Mann, Mala, Semedo, Lenira, Chao, Davina, Selman, Lucy E. and Byrne, Anthony. 2020. What elements of a systems approach to bereavement are most effective in times of mass bereavement? A narrative systematic review with lessons for COVID-19. Palliative Medicine 34(9), pp. 1165-1181. (10.1177/0269216320946273)
•Oakley, Natalie Jayne, Kneale, Dylan, Mann, Mala, Hilliar, Mariann, Dayan, Colin, Gregory, John W and French, Robert 2020. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and educational attainment in childhood: a systematic review. BMJ Open 10(1), article number: e033215. (10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033215)
•Nurmatov, Ulugbek, Foster, Catherine, Bezeczky, Zoe, Owen, Jennifer, El-Banna, Asmaa, Mann, Mala, Petrou, Stavros, Kemp, Alison, Scourfield, Jonathan, Forrester, Donald and Turley, Ruth2020. Impact of shared decision-making family meetings on children's out-of-home care, family empowerment and satisfaction: a systematic review. Project Report. [Online]. London: What Works Centre for Children's Social Care. Available at: https://whatworks-csc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/WWCSC_Family_Group_Conferencing_Report.pdf
•Mann, Mala, Woodward, Amanda, Nelson, Annmarie and Byrne, Anthony 2019. Palliative Care Evidence Review Service (PaCERS): a knowledge transfer partnership. Health Research Policy and Systems 17(1), article number: 100. (10.1186/s12961-019-0504-4)


3:15pm - 3:30pm
ID: 187 / 4.2: 7
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

An emerging concern in systematic reviews process: identifying articles published in predatory journals

Cécile Jaques, Jérôme Zbinden, Jolanda Elmers, Alexia Trombert

Medical Library, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Switzerland

Introduction: The purpose of systematic reviews is to evaluate and synthesise the best available evidence on a specific question, using rigorous and transparent methods. Generally, most of the included studies are scientific articles published in academic journals. Recently, the number of predatory journals has increased considerably. Predatory journals are often published under the gold open access model. They do not follow good editorial, publishing and transparency practices and use aggressive solicitation methods. As systematic reviews call for exhaustive searches in databases and complementary information sources, articles published in predatory journals might be retrieved. Because of the potential of poor quality, fraud, or erroneous and misleading data in studies published in these journals, their inclusion in a systematic review may affect its results and conclusions.

Aim: To create an automated instrument to help researchers identify articles from predatory journals among the articles retained for inclusion after the selection stage and before the quality appraisal and data extraction steps. The tool analyses a collection of articles and highlights suspicious titles.

Method: The criteria for identifying whether an article is published in a predatory journal should be searchable in an automated way for a set of articles.

Examples of the criteria considered in the initial design:

- Is the publisher a member of COPE (Committee on Publication Ethics)?

- Is the journal listed in DOAJ, or has wrongly claimed to be part of it?

- Is it indexed in Medline or in the Web of Science Core Collection?

- Is the ISSN listed on the ISSN International Centre Portal, and does its name match?

- Is it part of the updated « Beall’s list of Predatory Journals »?

We are still considering more criteria to be added to the instrument. In practical terms, the instrument takes a list of article references exported from EndNote in XML format. A weight is assigned to each criterion in order to calculate a score for each reference. The higher the score, the greater the chance that an article has been published in a predatory journal.

Results: We are currently analysing different sets of articles to improve the report of the results. This report is intended to inform the researchers of the results of the analysis. Researchers will have to check manually suspicious references using complementary criteria, according to a list that we will provide. Finally, they will have to decide how to handle the identified articles. Their strategy as well as the method used for identification should be described in the protocol. No guidance exists yet, but some recommendations have been published.

Conclusion: As a systematic review support service, it is important for us to provide our researchers with a tool to facilitate the identification of articles from predatory journals, which can be time consuming. With this instrument, information specialists are now able to help authors to identify this threat on the quality and validity of their systematic review.

Human Touch: This project emerged from discussions and interrogations within the review teams in which we are involved.

 
1:45pm - 3:30pm4.3: Workshop Education
Location: Schadee
 
ID: 167 / 4.3: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Education

Shopping in PubMed

Irma van Houts1, Sietske Vergeer2

1HAN, Netherlands, The; 2HAN, Netherlands, The

Biography and Bibliography
1. https://www.bmi-online.nl/bmi-bijscholing-irma-van-houts-ip-2018-09/
2. PubMed vernieuwd. In: IP vakblad voor informatieprofessionals, 2020/03
 
1:45pm - 3:30pm4.4: Workshop Professionals Connected
Location: Zeelenberg
 
ID: 116 / 4.4: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Professionals Connected

Exchange of experiences: How can medical research libraries support open science practices of their researchers?

Jasmin Schmitz

ZB MED - Information Centre for Life Sciences, Germany

Biography and Bibliography
Jasmin Schmitz received a PhD in information science. She worked as a freelance trainer for a commercial provider for scientific information and as scientific project coordinator in the field of bibliometrics. At ZB MED she is responsible for the Open Access Advisory Services.
For publication, talks etc.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1427-1808
 
3:30pm - 4:00pmCoffee Break
Location: Willem Burgerfoyer
4:00pm - 5:00pmNLM update
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Wichor Bramer
 
ID: 2244
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

NLM update

Dianne Babski

National Library of Medicine, United States of America

Since its founding in 1836, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has played a pivotal role in translating biomedical research into practice and been a leader in information innovation. As one of the 27 institutes and centers at the National Institutes of Health, NLM advances research in biomedical informatics and data science and is the world’s largest medical library.
Millions of scientists, health and information professionals, and the public use NLM services every day. Dianne Babski, Associate Director for Library Operations, will present an update that highlights available resources from the NLM.

 
6:30pm - 7:30pmAuthentic Dutch Musical Treat At Waterfront Terrace
Location: Wereldmuseum (external location)

One of the most iconic and monumental streetorgans of the Netherlands (the Lekkerkerker) will play authentic Dutch songs and golden oldies. 

7:00pm - 11:30pmConference Dinner
Location: Wereldmuseum (external location)
Date: Friday, 03/June/2022
9:00am - 10:00amP4: Plenary Speaker - Melissa Rethlefsen
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Ingeborg van Dusseldorp

Researching Ourselves: A Critical Role for Librarians

 
ID: 1240 / P4: 1
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Researching Ourselves: A Critical Role for Librarians

Melissa L. Rethlefsen

University of New Mexico Health Sciences Library & Informatics Center, United States of America

Conducting research is a critical aspect of our work as librarians, so that we can understand what works, what doesn't, and why. It can also help us demonstrate our value to others outside our profession by providing evidence of how what we do improves health, education, and research outcomes. Starting in research can be a challenge, but it starts with identifying questions that should be answered. Using the story of how I got involved in (and continue to do) research, we'll talk about the process of research and the benefits it can offer to one's career, library, and the profession.

Biography and Bibliography
Melissa Rethlefsen is the Executive Director of the Health Sciences Library & Informatics Center at the University of New Mexico, a position she began in January 2021. Prior to her current position, she was the Associate Dean, George A. Smathers Libraries, and Fackler Director, Health Science Center Libraries, at the University of Florida. She has also worked at the University of Utah, Mayo Clinic, Minnesota Department of Health, and the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on the role of librarians in improving research integrity, particularly in the reproducibility of systematic review searches.
 
10:00am - 10:30amCoffee Break
Location: Willem Burgerfoyer
10:30am - 12:00pm5.1: Oral Presentations - Education (2)
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Tiina Marketta Heino
 
10:30am - 10:45am
ID: 213 / 5.1: 1
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Developing systematic review expertise: bridging between theory and practice

Marshall Dozier

University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Introduction
The development of methods knowledge, skills and expertise to carry out robust systematic reviews (SRs) requires both an understanding of the underlying research principles and practical experience in design and application of the methods. Information specialists often provide training and guidance in SR planning and methods to students and researchers. The work presented here will give insights into the lived experience of novice systematic reviewers as they become proficient reviewers, and will enable those of use providing support or training to guide other novice reviewers on what to expect and plan to incorporate on their own learning journeys.
Aim
The aim of this evaluation is to map the learning journeys that bridge introductory SR training and the development of proficiency in practice.
Method/ Program Description
We offer Master of Public Health students with a credit-bearing course introducing the principles of SR methods, and providing light-touch practice of each phase of the review process, from question and criteria definition through to summarising findings. The course can only provide introductory-level skills that prepare students to be able to plan their own SR projects, and that more in-depth learning needs to happen while the students carry out SRs of their own. Within our institute we also have an evidence synthesis research group that carries out various review types, from rapid reviews and standalone SRs, to living reviews. We give students who have completed the SR course opportunities to participate in review teams with the research group. Once the students have developed both technical and soft skills, they can take on more challenging roles to enhance their expertise, such as review lead roles.
Results/ Evaluation
We have begun gathering reflective reports from our student and alumni collaborators, and plan to enrich and expand on these early data with focus-group-like discussions. These qualitative data will be analysed thematically.
Conclusion

We have not completed our evaluation, but early indications of learning journey elements from the reflective reports point to:

  • Access to mentoring from more experienced reviewers is valuable
  • Access to peer support and shared learning is valuable
  • Need to develop problem-solving skills to address research design and implementation decisions
  • Need to develop proficiency in relevant software tools needed
  • Need to develop various communication skills for teamwork, collaboration, oral and written expression of findings to different target audiences

Human Touch (Recommended)

building research capacity, supporting early career researchers, creating a learning community

Biography and Bibliography
Marshall Dozier leads a team of Academic Support Librarians working to support the Library in delivering the University's strategies for learning, teaching and research within the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. Marshall offers specialist library support to Deaneries within the Edinburgh Medical School and NHS in Lothian.

Student co-authors will be added.


10:45am - 11:00am
ID: 141 / 5.1: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Re-imagining the Classroom: The Long Term Effects of Coronavirus on Lesson Design

Kristina Caitlin Palmer

Universität Bern Bibliothek Medizin, Switzerland

Introduction

In Europe, few research support programs ensure students will attain a minimum level of competence in systematic searching. The Research Support (RS) department of the University of Bern Medical Library thus devised a curriculum to ensure students receive consistent instruction in research competencies. This program worked well until the onset of the Coronavirus closed classrooms and forced learning into a digital space. The RS team is now using the skills learned during lockdown to create hybrid classes and e-learning modules to support and reach students outside of the classroom.
Aim

This presentation will discuss how RS developed classes before the virus, the changes made during, and the lessons learned during the period of enforced virtual classes that will be applied to future classes both in-person and virtual. This presentation will also introduce participants to tools used to develop courses and course materials.
Method/ Program Description
.

The RS staff developed 12 courses about searching the literature, one of which was integrated in the mandatory curriculum and 10 were integrated as formal electives. These courses were initially presented as in-person courses with no virtual or e-learning materials. In early 2020 the program had to rapidly shift to online only courses which involved creating e-learning materials in the form of videos. Now that courses are slowly being offered in person again RS is developing interactive online tools to help make courses and learning objectives more accessible to students.

Results/ Evaluation

While in person every student was asked to fill out evaluation forms after each class. Classes were also given pre- and post-tests on the major topics of each class to track understanding. The same evaluations were given wile the classes were virtual. These evaluations were generally positive and useful in refining and developing the classes further. Evaluations will be given after the new in-person classes as well. E-learning modules will have a link to a similar evaluation. While high numbers of evaluations aren’t expected from the e-modules the number of people who have accessed the modules can be tracked and the information broken down by section which should allow tracking of which parts of the module are unpopular. Using these evaluation methods will allow for continuous improvement in the courses.

Conclusion

The changes to class design that were forced by the coronavirus will have long lasting effects on classes developed by RS. New classes will have access to online resources and self lead searching modules will be developed to help students who need help with searching and are unable to attend classes. These changes should make classes more accusable and useful to all University patrons.

Human Touch (Recommended)

My hope is that this presentation can help attendees see how e-learning tools, and searching courses can help their students. While these courses do have a high level of involvement in the beginning, they can also reduce the burden of searching help on library staff since students can be directed to classes instead of needing one-on-one meetings.

Biography and Bibliography
Kristina Palmer is a librarian at the University of Bern Medical Library. She has worked there since 2019 designing, developing and updating the searching curriculum. She graduated in 2019 from Texas Women's University with a Masters of Library Science and a Masters of Health Studies.

Previous presentations include:

A Bibliographic Analysis of Librarian Assistance on Systematic Reviews at CU Anschutz Medical Campus Hannah Craven, Kristina Palmer, Christi Piper. 2018 Midcontinental Chapter of the Medical Library Association, Lightning Talk Presentation, Virtual Conference

Bibliographic Management: Acquiring a Site License, Ramping Up Instruction, and The Campus Response. John Jones, Lisa Traditi, Kristina Palmer. 2017 Midcontinental Chapter of the Medical Library Association, Paper Presentation, Columbia, MO


11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 164 / 5.1: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

The Library’s Project Thesis Clinic

Marte Ødegaard, Ivana Malovic, Skjalg Tønnesen Kalvik, Sara Clarke

Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway

Introduction
What do we do when library teaching does not fit into the academic schedule? In response to this challenge, we started a project to provide information literacy teaching “just in time”.

A common challenge faced by academic libraries is reduced time granted to course- integrated teaching of information literacy. This raises the concern that students will not obtain the necessary information literacy skills required for their studies. In this presentation we describe how we met these challenges through the creation of freestanding courses covering central aspects of information literacy, tailored to medical students. The catalyst for this course was the project thesis (20 ECTS) that the students complete as part of their professional education.

The project thesis requires that students complete an independent scientific work wherein they specialize in a chosen field or innovation project. The project thesis is completed over a two-year period where January in year one contains courses in evidence-based medicine (EBM) and how to do a research project, and year two includes two teaching-free periods dedicated to project thesis work. The long time lag between the course in EBM and the individual study-period makes it difficult for the students to apply what they have learned. This leads to periodically increased pressure on the library due to the large number of students requesting instruction during their periods of self-directed learning.

Aim
The aim of this project was to find a solution to the added pressure on library services during the project thesis period by creating a suite of freestanding courses tailored specifically to the needs of the students. We had the following questions in the development of the project:

  • At which time will the students find the courses most useful?
  • How do we ensure that students get timely information when the project thesis stretches over a two-year period, and when faculty leaves little room for practical training in information skills?
  • How do we ensure the teaching we provide is relevant and covers the necessary topics?

Program Description
We created a collection of freestanding courses named the Project thesis clinic. The Project Thesis Clinic (PTC) lasts for a month and includes courses on academic writing, literature searching, critical appraisal, citing scientific literature, and individual guidance.

Evaluation
High attendance and positive feedback from the first clinic in 2021 showed the PTC was successful, which prompted the library to plan it again for January 2022. We adjusted the program based on feedback from the students in 2021 and aim to collect feedback in January 2022 using evaluation forms after the clinic has taken place.

Conclusion

This project has allowed us to test new teaching approaches, as well as ensuring that students receive required information literacy training “just-in-time” for when it is required. The global pandemic and need for digital solutions have also affected how the project has been developed.

Human Touch

Medical students feel the library provides them with the tools needed for success in their project.

Biography and Bibliography
Marte Ødegaard holds a Master of Science in Evidence Based Practice in Health Care and works at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway. Her work interests are information literacy, systematic searches, and the librarians role in research.

Ivana Malovic holds a Ph.d. in Medical Biology and works at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway. Her work interests are critical appraisal, open science and research data management.

Skjalg Tønnessen Kalvik holds a Bachelor of Library and Information Sciences and works at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway.

Sara Clarke holds a Master in Information Services Management and is Head of Section for Literature Searching and EBM at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway.


11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 142 / 5.1: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Assessing EBM Behaviors of Medical Students via an OSCE: The Librarian Perspective

Joey Nicholson1, Adina Kalet2, Anique de Bruin3, Cees van der Vleuten3

1NYU Health Sciences Library, NYU Langone Health, USA; 2Kern Institute, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA; 3Maastricht University, School of Health Professions Eduction, Netherlands

Introduction
The ability for medical students to form clinical questions and retrieve evidence to advance patient care is an integral set of skills necessary both to provide the best care, and also to meet lifelong learning goals. While it is common for librarians to teach these skills, it is much less common for librarians to contribute actively to robust formative assessment of them as part of their education practice.

When librarians assess these evidence-based medicine (EBM) skills in medical students, the assessments tend to run parallel to standard curricular assessments and are based solely on multiple choice or essay-style written exams. However, this does not allow an opportunity for formative feedback to be given on actual performed behaviors integrated with other key clinical activities.

Observed structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are a common method of assessing and providing feedback on how medical students actually perform behaviors that they are expected to practice. Ideally, assessment of EBM should be integrated into existing assessment systems and structures, like the OSCE, in order to be better aligned with medical student and faculty expectations. This type of assessment is necessary to reinforce learning and provide actionable feedback.

An EBM OSCE station was recently developed and implemented as part of an immersive OSCE assessing multiple clinical skills. This EBM OSCE is currently being used at a cohort of 6 medical schools.

However, librarians involved have not been familiar with or prepared to assess EBM behaviors via observation. The purpose of this study is to determine how feasible and useful it is for librarians to assess medical student EBM behaviors via a video-observed OSCE.
Aim
To understand and document the experiences and preferences of health sciences librarians regarding assessing EBM behaviors in medical students in order to inform EBM assessment tool development and validation and offer potential solutions to barriers in implementation.
Method/ Program Description
This study will employ a focus group design using an opportunistic sample of health sciences librarians who have already participated in this video-observed EBM OSCE. Focus groups will be followed up as necessary with individual semi-structured interviews.
Results/ Evaluation
Focus group transcripts will be analyzed and coded using a Constructivist Grounded Theory approach. Data will be primarily analyzed by the principal investigator beginning with a round of initial coding to surface main themes, and a second round of focused coding. Focus groups are planned for early 2022.

Conclusion

It is expected that librarians will find assessing EBM behaviors of medical students via a video-based OSCE useful in providing formative feedback to students and helping to reinforce key concepts in EBM. Additionally, by observing and understanding student behaviors, librarians can create a feedback loop to improve and better tailor their instruction. However, it is also expected that librarians may face many common barriers to feasibility, including: the time commitment, curricular support, and administrative support.

Human Touch

This research aims to help librarians connect better with both students and faculty and to further understanding of the role of the librarian in teaching and assessment of EBM.

Biography and Bibliography
Mr. Joey Nicholson is the Chair and Director of the NYU Health Sciences Library at NYU Langone Health. Over the past 10 years, he has been responsible for integrating evidence-based medicine teaching and assessment within the curriculum for students in the Grossman School of Medicine. As a part of this work, he worked with a team of clinicians and faculty to develop better ways of assessing and providing feedback to medical students on these important skills. This research is also a part of his dissertation work, focused on assessing EBM behaviors via observation. Below is a short list of recent publications relevant to and fundamental in developing and guiding this abstract proposal.

1. Kalet A, Zabar S, Szyld D, et al. A simulated "Night-onCall" to assess and address the readiness-for-internship of transitioning medical students. Adv Simul (Lond). 2017;2:13. Published 2017 Aug 14. doi:10.1186/s41077-017-0046-1

2. Nicholson J, Spak JM, Kovar-Gough I, Lorbeer ER, Adams NE. Entrustable professional activity 7: opportunities to collaborate on evidence-based medicine teaching and assessment of medical students. BMC Med Educ. 2019;19(1):330. Published 2019 Sep 3. doi:10.1186/s12909-019-1764-y

3. Nicholson J, Kalet A, van der Vleuten C, de Bruin A. Understanding medical student evidence-based medicine information seeking in an authentic clinical simulation. J Med Libr Assoc. 2020;108(2):219-228. doi:10.5195/jmla.2020.875


11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 232 / 5.1: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Building searching skills early in the veterinary school curriculum to support evidence based practice

Heather K Moberly, Virginia R Fajt

Texas A&M University, United States of America

Introduction

Evidence based practice is based on a series of steps that include identification, critical appraisal, and application of information. Learning to create answerable questions to describe a clinical scenario and to construct literature searches are foundation steps for the appraisal and application. Librarians are well suited to teach and assess these first steps and to collaborate with veterinary faculty to create a complete and contextualized evidence based medicine, or evidence based veterinary medicine education experience for students.

Aim

A veterinary faculty member teaching evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) in a pharmacology course included librarian a led instruction session for a number of years. During a curriculum reorganization, EBVM was added to the first year curriculum as a component of the Critical Thinking module in the Professional and Clinical Skills (PCS) course. The aim of this move was to introduce EBVM earlier in the curriculum and provide additional opportunities for these skills to be scaffolded and reinforced throughout the four year curriculum.

Method/ Program Description

This presentation describes the collaborative EBVM sessions and assignments during the first two years of veterinary school during the PCS course in year one and the pharmacology course in year two. These classes were recently redesigned to provide the students with a contiguous three semester foundation of the Ask, Acquire, and Appraise steps of EBVM. During this sequence of sessions both the subject and library faculty provide lectures, hands-on laboratories, anonymous and non-anonymous in class "polling" interactions, and feedback for both ungraded and graded assignments.

Results/ Evaluation

The current series of EBVM sessions and assignments during the first two years of a veterinary curriculum expand upon their predecessors. The additional sessions and assignments are placed in a more contextualized environment to increase perceived relevance by the students.

Conclusion

Expanding time in the critical thinking module of the veterinary curriculum (spring semester, year one), increasing the number of graded assignments and the associated point values of the assignments, and strengthening instruction support for searching skills is expected to improve searching skills and increase retention of the skills for use the following semester (Fall semester, year two). Improving these first and second year skills is expected to improve comfort and adoption of the EBVM method in the later clinical years of the curriculum and in postgraduate practice.

Biography and Bibliography
Heather K. Moberly currently serves as the Coordinator of Veterinary Information and Research Services and holds the Dorothy G. Whitley Professorship in Library Science. Dr. Virginia R. Fajt is a clinical professor and clinical veterinary pharmacologist who teaches throughout the veterinary curriculum and currently serves as Chair of the Curriculum Committee. In 2013 they began collaborating with the explicit intention to improve and increase the inclusion of the evidence-based veterinary medicine methodology across the veterinary curriculum. Both recently completed terms in offices in the Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine Association; Fajt as Director followed by President, Moberly as Executive Secretary followed by Director. Moberly is a co-author of the "Acquire" module of the EBVM Learning online, open access tutorial. (https://EBVMLearning.org)


11:45am - 12:00pm
ID: 226 / 5.1: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Online-only postgraduate taught programmes at the University of Edinburgh – unexpected benefits to online only students of the development of online services and resources to support campus based students during Covid

Fiona Brown, Marshall Dozier

University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Introduction

The University of Edinburgh has provided online only postgraduate taught programmes since 2004, and the Library has supported these programmes and students, developing services and resources to do so. Over this time, the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine (CMVM) had a strategic aim to increase the number of postgraduate programmes delivered online only. In the 2020-2021 academic year 95% of CMVM’s 3000 postgraduate taught students were on online only programmes.
In March 2020, in common with universities and colleges worldwide, the University of Edinburgh responded to the Covid outbreak by looking at ways to move campus-based learning, teaching and support online. CMVM used the experience of delivering online-only programmes to feed into this. From a library services perspective, there were also knock-on benefits for students on online only programmes as further online resources and services moved online.

Aim

We will report on our activities in supporting the transition to online and the unexpected impacts on our online only students.
Program Description

In the Library, we used our experience of supporting online only programmes to help develop our support for the campus based students who were transitioning to online. We provide online resources, online teaching and online trouble shooting. Following the start of the pandemic, we made better use of some of the technology which we already had, delivering more of our services online.
We will be forecasting the impact should services return to pre-pandemic availability options.

Evaluation

We are in the process of gathering input from our library colleagues in our collections services teams and our academic support teams. We are evaluating whether, and how, we will adjust our teaching and support practices even if we have a return to campus.
We are also gathering input from academic colleagues, course teams and students on online-only programmes on how (if at all) our resource and service developments have impacted on the learning and teaching experience.

Conclusion

We are still gathering information on the impacts of these changes and developments. Indicative areas we are looking at include the changes to delivery, and recording of, our one-to-one and generic information skills provision; how the increase in our recorded information skills provision has impacted on how we deliver our teaching and support; and the growth of our etextbook provision and whether this is sustainable.

Human Touch (Recommended)

The authors would be interested in hearing if colleagues in other libraries have had similar experiences.
We feel this links with current dialogues in the UK networks on ebook costs.

Biography and Bibliography
Fiona Brown is Academic Support Librarian for Veterinary Medicine, Roslin Institute and Biological Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. She provides specialist support to staff and students, both campus based and online, in all matters relating to library services. Her role includes the design, delivery and evaluation of information skills training for staff and students. She liaises with colleagues to support the Library in delivering the University's strategies for learning, teaching and research. She is a co-author of EBVM Learning (ebvmlearning.org).

Marshall Dozier leads a team of Academic Support Librarians working to
support the Library in delivering the University's strategies for
learning, teaching and research within the College of Medicine and
Veterinary Medicine. Marshall offers specialist library support to
Deaneries within the Edinburgh Medical School and NHS in Lothian.
 
10:30am - 12:00pm5.2: Oral Presentations - Resources and Metrics (2)
Location: Van Beuningen
Session Chair: Witold Kozakiewicz
 
10:30am - 10:45am
ID: 194 / 5.2: 1
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

A BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF COVID-19 PANDEMIC HEALTHCARE RESEARCH IN AN LMIC

Moriam Taiwo Chibuzor

Cochrane Nigeria, Nigeria

Introduction

The Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has had tremendous impact on various aspects of human life since its emergence in 2020, including education, economic activities, commerce and health care. These impacts have been felt globally including Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC). In LMICs, the impact of COVID-19 is complicated by poor health systems and inadequate resources to adequately finance infection prevention and control. COVID 19 has, therefore, placed an additional burden on already overburdened health systems of LMICs.

COVID-19 research is a vital part of public health emergency response as it provides evidence for the rapid development of strategies to control and prevent future epidemics. Due to the peculiarities facing LMICs there is need for research to be conducted in LMICs to ensure that proffered solutions adequately address the unique issues faced by these countries and also to ensure applicability of research results to these areas. There is currently no bibliometric analysis summarizing the types and patterns of research that has been conducted in our country.

Aim

This research aims to explore the trends in COVID-19 healthcare research in a lower middle income country by conducting a Bibliometric analysis of the literature.

Method

We will search for healthcare COVID-19 research articles published in our country between 1 December 2019 to 31 December 2021 in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and Google Scholar and the Cochrane Library. These databases will be searched using controlled vocabulary (e.g. Medical subject Headings) and text words for COVID-19 and the name of our country. Only articles published in English language will be included. No limitations will be placed on article type or study design. We will extract data on document type, year of publication, study design, authors, author institutions, journals, international collaborations, funding agencies, and research focus/theme of the study.

Results

We will report the results of the bibliometric analysis of COVID-19 health care research in the LMIC, namely.

• Publication output (Number of publications and timeline)

• Trends in research themes

• Top ranking authors, and institutions/agencies

• Types of publications/research designs

• National and international collaborations

• Funding agencies

• Sources (Top ranking Journals of publication; published or preprints)

Conclusion

This research has not yet been carried out and as such we cannot give final conclusions. We expect, however, that the research will provide empirical evidence on trends in COVID-19 health care research in a LMIC which will be valuable to researchers, policy makers and other decision makers. It has the potential to assist researchers in identifying gaps for future research. It may also help to highlight national research priorities for infection, prevention and control of COVID-19; potential areas for allocation of funding; and collaborations for research. In the area of research productivity, it will identify institutional contributions to research.

Human Touch (Recommended)

The COVID situation affects us all, but firsthand experience from LMICs is not heard much in high income countries. This presentation will provide a unique insight to differences and challenges librarians face in other parts of the world.



10:45am - 11:00am
ID: 151 / 5.2: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Computational assistance in the analysis of cited references in biomedical literature: a case study from two institutions

Teresa Lee1, Pablo Iriarte2, Floriane Sophie Muller2, Ramon Cierco Jimenez1

1International Agency for Research on Cancer, France; 2Library of the University of Geneva

Introduction
At Institution A, a building move in 2022 requires a 40% reduction of its physical collection and a weeding strategy for the library’s print journals. From this scenario a question emerges: how old, on average, is the literature cited by in-house scientists in their own publications? According to Kaplan et al.1 recent materials are accessed more frequently than older ones, with a significant drop for anything older than 15 years. In this project, we empirically test this assertion using computational assistance. Institution A’s librarian teamed up with a doctoral student in bioinformatics to parse citations retrieved from Web of Science based on an OG (enhanced organization) field search. University of B collaborators joined the experimental effort to test not only Kaplan et al.’s rule1, but to interrogate the dataset in ways that may shed light on historic citation trends, open-access and the electronic availability of research literature, the lasting prominence of super-cited references, and more.
Aim
1. To build a librarian-friendly utility for the parsing of Web of Science records that allows analysis of the cited items associated with the primary set of records.
2. To see whether the 15-year rule for cited literature holds true of the article outputs of Institution A and the University of B’s biomedical faculty.
3. To ascertain what other findings regarding historical citation trends, open-access and the electronic availability of literature arise from an experimental parsing and interrogation of the dataset resulting from Web of Science affiliation-based searches.
Methods
Sets of records based on OG (enhanced organization) field searches for the University of B and for Institution A will be retrieved and parsed using Python2 or R3. A methodology for cleaning up the parsed set of records will be determined, implemented, and reported. Parsed and cleaned data from this initial process will be correlated with data from other sources of information (for e.g., CrossRef) to find answers to questions that go beyond what analysing Web of Science records alone can provide
Results
TBA
Conclusion
TBA
References
1. Kaplan R, Steinberg M, Doucette J. Retention of retrospective print journals in the digital age: trends and analysis. J Med Libr Assoc. 2006;94(4):387-e200.
2. Van Rossum, G., & Drake Jr, F. L. (1995). Python reference manual. Centrum voor Wiskunde en Informatica Amsterdam.
3. R Core Team (2021). R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. URL https://www.R-project.org/.
Human Touch (Recommended)
Multidisciplinary collaboration; experimentation

Biography and Bibliography
Teresa Lee is the Knowledge Manager at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (UARC/WHO), where she leads the central publications programme, library and web services.

Pablo Iriarte is the IT coordinator of the University of Geneva Library since 2017. He studied physics and worked for several years at the Lausanne University Hospital as IT manager for the Medical Library and the Documentation and Data unit of the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine.

Floriane Muller works as a full-time scientific librarian for the medical and pharmaceutical unit of the University of Geneva Library since 2015. Initially responsible of the interlibrary loan and document delivery service, she is now in charge of Open Access, Publishing and Research Data Management support. She has a master’s degree in Information Science from the University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland.

Ramon Cierco Jimenez is a PhD student in bioinformatics from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) doing his project at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in Lyon (France). He has a master’s degree in Omics data analysis, and a univeristiy degree in Biotechnology, both from the Univeristat de Vic - Universitat Central de Catalunya (UVIC-UCC)


11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 186 / 5.2: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Analysis of training delivered and literature search requests. What are we doing right - or wrong?

Anne Madden, Niamh Lucey, Gerry McManus

St. Vincent's University Hospital, Ireland

Introduction
As a teaching hospital, a new group of junior doctors arrives each year on rotation through different specialties. To maintain the professional competencies which are required for their Irish Medical Council registration, they must complete a certain amount of CPD in addition to completing a Clinical Audit and taking part in research. During their rotation through the hospital, they have been very regular users of library training and services such as literature search requests. In addition to the medical/surgical staff, we support an on-site School of Nursing and a range of Allied Health specialties who are also frequent visitors to the Library.

Aim
Using our statistics we want to examine our activities and the profile of our users over time and identify any trends or changes to either demand for services or user profile, with a specific focus on outcomes from our clients' interactions with us.

Method/ Program Description
Over the years, we have built up a database of services provided by the Library. We will break these down and analyse them for correlational activity, trends or inconsistencies. We will also try to trace any outcomes of the services we have provided and where possible, the rationale behind these outcomes.

Results/ Evaluation
The main purpose is to see whether we can identify a rationale behind any identified trends so we can use them to inform or adjust future Library services planning. Ideally, we would be able to infer a causal relationship between the services we provide and outputs by clients. If this doesn't exist, then we must try to determine why not and what we can do to improve it.

Conclusion

Data collection is an important activity but loses effectiveness if it is not used to underpin and develop the service. Through this analysis, we hope to provide a solid evidence base to plan for the services we provide including identifying any challenges or benefits that may arise from working from home, both on the part of the user and of ourselves, should this become standard practice.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Working in a hospital over the last two years, we are witnessing a lot of exhausted and traumatised frontline staff. The best help that the Library can provide is to ensure that we respond quickly and thoroughly to their information needs. By analysing our interactions with our colleagues on the frontline, we can identify gaps, trends or opportunities to improve on the service we provide.

Finally, as I retire next year I wanted to leave a "legacy" to my colleagues and so I came up with this project which I hope will be of use to both the Library and to its clients into the future!

Biography and Bibliography
Anne Madden, St. Vincent’s University Hospital. Orcid ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6031-6862. Anne is Assistant Librarian at St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin. She has a BA (Languages), BSc (Mgt), Dip Mgt Law, HDIp in Library & Information Science, and is an Associate Member of the Library Association of Ireland. Latest publication: Dunne, M., Halton, L., Herlihy, B., Madden, A. and O'Sullivan, N., 2021. Motorways to boreens: the story of the Irish Health Sciences Libraries Group virtual journal club. Journal of Health Information and Libraries Australasia, 2(3), pp.71-80. https://www.johila.org/index.php/Johila/article/view/88 Earlier publications are available on her ORCID account.
Niamh Lucey has a Masters in Library & Information Studies from University College Dublin. Since 2001, she has been Head of Library & Information Services in St Vincent's University Hospital in Dublin. She is currently Chair of the Irish Health Sciences Group of the Library Association of Ireland and her professional interests include measuring impact, library promotion and EBLIP.
Gerry McManus has a Masters Degree in Anglo-Irish Literature/Drama, a BA in English & Philosophy, and a HDip in Library & Information Science. He currently works part-time as Information Specialist for the National Disability Authority and the Mental Health Commission, and in Reader Services for St. Vincent's University Hospital Library. He has previously worked as Head of Library Services for the LauraLynn Hospice Foundation, and for Our Lady's Hospice in Dublin.


11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 220 / 5.2: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Statistical Reading in Evaluation of Electronic Resources

Gussun Gunes

Marmara University, Turkey

Introduction

With the advancement of technology, diversity in the source of information and differences in transformation are increasing day by day in the digital world. In this context users who want to continue their research regardless of the concept of time and space. Libraries can provide these request through many electronic resources. Information retrieval of these requests are progressing in direct proportion to the diversity in the library collections. Connected electronic resources which are offered to users by their institutions through various publisher. The rate of use of resources show us usage of users with information and digital literacy skils.

Aim

Electronic resources such as books, journals, articles and videos are formats of electronic parts of publications with many different disciplines. Information presentations and views could be change in each formats. Some databases that provide information especially on e-book, e-journals content in the field. Some databases who give content on video lessons with 3D or virtual simulation content such as anatomy, clinical skills, etc. or evidence base resources. Libraries and librarians need to track usage statistics for identify user needs and to develop library collections and services. Usage statistics modules are unit these digital sources and supported by various softwares. Usage statistics modules and statistics retrieval processes differ according to electronic resources.

Method/ Program Description

Librarians mostly use vendor provided data for electronic resources usage and used the standart data for their reports. Usage data to show cost per use of various products and to inform decisions about subscriptions and their licenses.This study is based on statistical data reading that obtained from electronic resource usage statistics modules and examines the methods of reading data through examples for librarians.

Results/ Evaluation

Each publisher obtains, presents and makes available different statistics for libraries according to their own policies interface and statistical standards. Librarians needs more digital literacy component to acquire the data and this presentation will introduce how to collect and read statistical data from electronic resources.

Conclusion

Libraries and librarians need reliable usage statistics for the electronic resources to evaluate, manage, present them for consideration in decision making and planning to apply usage data effectively.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Obtaining statistics for electronic resources is mainly done by librarians.

Biography and Bibliography
Al, U., & Al, P. (2003). Elektronik Bilgi Kaynaklarının Seçimi. Bilgi Dünyası, 1-14.
ANKOS. (2021). https://ankos.org.tr/tr/
Clinical Skills. (2021). Elsevier Clinical Skills Web site:https://www.elsevierclinicalskills.co.uk/
EBSCO. (2021). EBSCO Web sitesi: https://www.ebsco.com/tr-tr/urunler/arastirma-veri-tabanlari
adresinden alındı
EKUAL. (2021). https://cabim.ulakbim.gov.tr/ekual/e-veri-tabanlari/
İspir, Z., & Markuş, H. (2017). E-kaynak yönetimi ve e-kaynak yönetiminde kullanıcı eğitimlerininönemi: Özyeğin Üniversitesi Kütüphanesi örneği. Akademik Kütüphanelerde Kaynak Yönetimi Sempozyumu, 91-101.
Polat, C. (2017). Teknolojilerinin Bilgi Merkezlerine ve Hizmetlerine Etkileri. HiperLink.
Süzer, R. (2020). Üniversite kütüphanesi kullanıcılarının bilgi kaynağı tercihi. Yüksek Lisan Tezi. AnkaraÜniversitesi, Sosyal Bilimler Enstitüsü.


11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 111 / 5.2: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

How Health Education England and NHS Librarians collaborated to share and peer review COVID-19 literature searches during the pandemic

Helene Gorring1, Lindsay Snell2

1Health Education England, United Kingdom; 2University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom

Background

In response to the evident need to enable more sharing and reduce duplication during the COVID-19 pandemic, Health Education England (HEE) mobilised a group of expert searchers from across the NHS in England. With many NHS library staff redeployed in the first wave of the pandemic, HEE was keen to make a shared bank of literature searches relating to COVID-19 available to NHS staff who had limited access to library services and expert searchers.

The group worked at speed to develop a database and health librarians were invited to submit searches and strategies they had completed on Covid topics. The expert searchers conducted light touch peer review before making content available on the Knowledge for Healthcare website.

Objectives

The aim of our study was to document the origins of the Covid-19 search bank, evaluate attitudes of the NHS health library community towards it, and capture learning from the expert searchers about their experiences project.

Methods

Structured interviews with the peer reviewers were conducted, and a survey of the NHS library community using the search bank was undertaken.

Results

A total of 258 searches were submitted to the group between mid-March and beginning of December 2020, of which 209 were included in the search bank. 85 health librarians responded to the survey and interviews yielded valuable qualitative data.

Both the survey and interview responses demonstrated the strong ethos of collaboration in the NHS library community and a desire to contribute to the disaster response to the pandemic by sharing, saving others time and effort.

Discussion and Conclusion

Peer review is a sensitive topic, but important for quality assurance and valuable professional development. We found that a buddy system is particularly beneficial for peer reviewers, but that a clearer structure for a peer review process is needed.

The project identified that the quality of searches is variable, and that even competent searchers displayed a lack of confidence in their abilities. It was clear that in any future search bank initiatives feedback on searches and strategies submitted should be provided to critique work and provide suggestions.

Neither the survey or interviews validated the need or appetite for a non-topic-specific search bank. It was identified that any future search banks need a clear purpose as searches are otherwise too diverse. Search strategies were considered more useful as a resource than the searches themselves which quickly go out of date.

The main weakness of the project was found to be the lack of clearer guidance for contributors. Whilst this was due to the evolving nature of the initiative, the limited research available at the start of the pandemic, and that the group sought to take a pragmatic and responsive approach, clearer parameters would need to be in place for any future search bank.

All the peer reviewers involved in this initiative clearly felt it to have been a personally and professionally rewarding process with positive impacts on their practice and other benefits such as wider networking with health librarians.

Biography and Bibliography
Hélène Gorring

Helene has worked at Health Education England since 2018, working at a national and regional level (London & the South East) level to provide professional support to NHS librarians on resource discovery.
Prior to this she was Library Manager for a mental health NHS Trust in Birmingham for 12 years.
Helene was International Officer for CILIP’s Health Libraries Group for many years, working with Partnerships in Health Information (Phi) to run a bursary for health librarians from Low and Middle Income Countries and also managing the Core Collections series of books.

Lindsay Snell

Lindsay is a Clinical Librarian, providing knowledge and evidence support to a number of teams and groups within University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust. She previously worked in outreach roles supporting primary care and community based staff. She is an experienced searcher, with a particular interest in literature searches provided to clinical and managerial staff to support their day to day work.
 
10:30am - 12:00pm5.3: Workshop Information Retrieval
Location: Schadee
 
ID: 208 / 5.3: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Updating reviews: let’s discuss best practice

Eli Harriss1, Sabine Klein2

1University of Oxford, United Kingdom; 2University of Zurich, Switzerland

Biography and Bibliography
Eli Harriss has worked as an information specialist for over 15 years. She was cited as a co-author on 13 reviews published in 2021. She is currently employed as the Outreach and Enquiry Services Manager at the Bodleian Health Care Libraries, University of Oxford.

Sabine Klein is a former medical subject librarian and newly appointed product manager at the Zurich University Library. She strives to improve products and customer services.
 
10:30am - 12:00pm5.4: Workshop Information Retrieval
Location: Zeelenberg
 
ID: 115 / 5.4: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Explore tools and automation for supporting systematic review and guideline processes

Muguet Koobasi, Ann De Meulemeester, Renaat Peleman, Nele Pauwels

Knowledge Centre for Health Ghent, Ghent University, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium

Biography and Bibliography
Muguet Koobasi is an information specialist at the Knowledge Centre for Health Ghent (University of Ghent and University Hospital Ghent) where she provides courses, aims to improve information literacy for health sciences and supports and advises stakeholders on searching, processing and publishing literature. She also works independently with organisations involved in writing systematic reviews or guidelines. She has a background in guideline development in the area of kidney disease and is skilled in collecting, organising and disseminating information. She has a specific interest in implementing specialised technology and tools aiming to improve the processes relevant to systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines.

Bibliography:
- Oniscu G.C., Abramowicz D., Bolignano D., Gandolfini I., Hellemans R., Maggiore U., Nistor I., O'Neill S., Sever M.S., Koobasi M., Nagler E.V. (2021). Management of obesity in kidney transplant candidates and recipients: A clinical practice guideline by the Descartes working group of ERA. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfab310 (Online ahead of print)
- Van Acker P., Van Biesen W., Nagler E.V., Koobasi M., Veys N., Vanmassenhove J. (2021). Risk prediction models for acute kidney injury in adults: An overview of systematic reviews. PLoS One. 2021 16(4): e0248899. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0248899
- Gallieni M., Hollenbeck M., Inston N., Kumwenda M., Powell S., Tordoir J., Al Shakarchi J., Berger P., Bolignano D., Cassidy D., Chan T.Y., Dhondt A., Drechsler C.,
Ecder T., Finocchiaro P., Haller M., Hanko J., Heye S., Ibeas J., Jemcov T., Kershaw S., Khawaja A., Labriola L., Lomonte C., Malovrh M., Marti I Monros A., Matthew S., McGrogan D., Meyer T., Mikros S., Nistor I., Planken N., Roca-Tey R., Ross R., Troxler M., van der Veer S., Vanholder R., Vermassen F., Welander G., Wilmink T., Koobasi M., Fox J., Van Biesen W., Nagler E. (2019). Clinical practice guideline on peri- and postoperative care of arteriovenous fistulas and grafts for haemodialysis in adults. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation ;34(Suppl 2):ii1-ii42. doi: 10.1093/ndt/gfz072.

Dr. Nele Pauwels works currently (since 2015) as Information Specialist at the Knowledge Center for Health Ghent. After she obtained her PhD in Medical Sciences, Nele worked as staff member at Center for Evidence-Based Practice of the Belgian Red Cross-Flanders. She developed evidence-based guidelines and systematic reviews, according to international gold standards. Currently, she supports researchers during all stages of performing and writing a systematic review by give workshops and by giving individual guidance. Topics of her workshops are ‘advanced searching in several (bio)medical databases’, and ‘tools for systematic reviews (e.g. Rayyan and DistillerSR)’, and ‘conducting and publishing a systematic review and meta-analysis’.

Bibliography:
- Rammant, E., Van Wilder, L., Van Hemelrijck, M., Pauwels, N. S., Decaestecker, K., Van Praet, C., Bultijnck, R., Ost, P., Van Vaerenbergh, T., Verhaeghe, S., Van Hecke, A., & Fonteyne, V. (2020). Health-related quality of life overview after different curative treatment options in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: an umbrella review. Quality of life research : an international journal of quality of life aspects of treatment, care and rehabilitation, 29(11), 2887–2910. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-020-02544-z
- Van Acker, J., Pauwels, N. S., Cauwels, R., & Rajasekharan, S. (2020). Outcomes of different radioprotective precautions in children undergoing dental radiography: a systematic review. European archives of paediatric dentistry : official journal of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry, 21(4), 463–508. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40368-020-00544-8
- De Tobel, J., Bauwens, J., Parmentier, G., Franco, A., Pauwels, N. S., Verstraete, K. L., & Thevissen, P. W. (2020). Magnetic resonance imaging for forensic age estimation in living children and young adults: a systematic review. Pediatric radiology, 50(12), 1691–1708. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00247-020-04709-x
- Van der Looven, R., Le Roy, L., Tanghe, E., Samijn, B., Roets, E., Pauwels, N., Deschepper, E., De Muynck, M., Vingerhoets, G., & Van den Broeck, C. (2020). Risk factors for neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Developmental medicine and child neurology, 62(6), 673–683. https://doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.14381
- Van der Looven, R., Le Roy, L., Pauwels, N., & Vingerhoets, G. (2020). Critical appraisal tools and rater training in systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Developmental medicine and child neurology, 62(6), 764. https://doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.14538
 
12:00pm - 1:00pmEvaluation of poster and presentations
12:00pm - 1:00pmLunch break
Location: Willem Burgerfoyer
1:00pm - 2:00pmGeneral Assembly
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Tiina Marketta Heino
 
ID: 1241
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Global Commission on Evidence to Address Societal Challenges

Grimshaw Jeremy

Evidence Commission Secretariat, Canada

Join the General Assembly to hear about the Global Commission on Evidence report and start a conversation with Prof Grimshaw on how information specialists in all sectors, and our professional associations like EAHIL, can work together to improve high quality evidence support and evidence implementation systems.

 
2:00pm - 2:30pmClosure and invitation to Trondheim 2023
Location: Willem Burgerzaal
Session Chair: Wichor Bramer
Session Chair: Ingeborg van Dusseldorp
Date: Monday, 06/June/2022
10:00am - 10:05amLightning Talks

Due to too few submission we decided not to program a session with lightning talks in the physical programme in Rottedam. However, we decided to make the accepted submission available online.

 
ID: 1235 / Lightning Talks: 1
Lightning Talks

Outreach – fast, frequent, and fun!

Helen Sjöblom, Linda Hammarbäck, Eva Hessman

Biomedical Library, Gothenburg University Library, Sweden

Introduction
Starting 2015, we weekly arrange 20-minutes-drop-in-sessions as a way to reach out to our researchers and PhD-students. We have 8-9 themes per semester and always run the same content for two weeks. Please use the link https://tinyurl.com/3jr6v9uk for themes spring -22

Program Description
When we set the themes for the sessions, our focus is always on services and tools we believe our researchers will benefit from. We often take the opportunity to highlight support services we feel the faculty lack awareness of and where our competence is not well recognized. Once or twice per semester we choose a tool or a phenomenon we ourselves wish to explore. Setting up a 20-minutes-session gives us a deadline, and is an excellent opportunity to broaden our knowledge base.

Pre-covid the sessions were held at faculty premises. During the pandemic we went digital using Zoom, and we will probably continue with Zoom partly because the number of participants rised.


Conclusion
To be able to run these sessions as part of our weekly schedule we make sure to mix stuff we already know with new content we need to learn. 20 minutes pass fast, and it is really important to get to the core of the matter. We have also learned that you do not have to know everything about something to be able to talk about it for 20 minutes



ID: 1237 / Lightning Talks: 2
Lightning Talks

Prepaid APC:s as whitelists – Jeopardizing the Academic Libray brand

Helen Sjöblom, Linda Hammarbäck, Eva Hessman

Biomedical Library, Gothenburg University Library, Sweden

Introduction
Article processing charges (APC:s) are increasingly being paid by institutions, or on a national consortia level. Signed agreements between academic libraries and publishers are then being posted on library websites to let researchers know if they can get the full APC paid for, or a discount with the journal of their choice. On the websites, agreements are usually presented as a database or list of publishers, and often accompanied by a journal search/checker tool. Researchers trust these lists to be reliable sources of reputable OA publishers.


Description

The Library role is in transition. We have always been curating our library collections, but are now tending to curate academic publications as well. This is a new emerging role for the library.

There are many aspects to consider when entering this new role.

  • Demand – are we consciously curating, and should we curate publications? – providing APC:s also implies promoting publishers by steering our researchers towards our selection of publishing venues.
  • Research and Publishing ethics & quality control – avoid beeing associated with questionable publishers
  • Cost effectiveness
  • Coverage – a fair selection of publishing alternatives for all disciplines

Conclusion
The balance in giving people what they want, and maintaining quality standards, can make decisions related to read and publish deals a difficult task. Statistical data, based on institutional publications might reveal unexpected proportions being published with less reputable publishers. Agreements entered with such market players will inevitably mitigate their questionnable publishing practices. When researchers find them in the library APC-database, they will accordingly assume that the publisher is ok.



ID: 1236 / Lightning Talks: 3
Lightning Talks

Put information retrieval in context - Mandatory Doctoral course at the faculty of Medicine, University of Gothenburg

Helen Sjöblom, Linda Hammarbäck, Eva Hessman

Biomedical Library, Gothenburg University Library, Sweden

Introduction

The foundation of all our teaching is of course searching for information but we have the ambition to put information retrieval in a larger context for the doctoral students. We want them to be knowledgeable about their subject area - what has been published before, the research methods used, relevant journals and authors, how to avoid research waste and finding the gaps – to create a true understanding for their subject specific research landscape!


Program Description
To achieve this we dedicated our workshops to three themes. Workshop one focuses on the research landscape, workshop two on information searching and workshop three on information management. We feel that the course makeover structures the content in a workflow that better corresponds to the research process. It motivates the students and gives them a deeper understanding of their role in the research landscape.

Conclusion
Teaching the content has become more clear and straightforward for us but also for the students. We do think that we have managed to present the context of searching so that it is more than just a technical task to be taught.

 
10:00am - 10:05amOnline Posters

Online Posters will be available during and after the conference. Here an overview of the posters that are not presented live in Rotterdam, but available online. (Note: The timing for this session is fictional)

 
ID: 138 / Online Posters: 1
Online Poster
Topics: Resources and metrics

A step towards improving the perception of 'journal quality' criteria

Mina Moradzadeh1,2, Shahram Sedghi1, Sirous Panahi1, Yunes Jahani2, Sahar Najafizadeh2

1Iran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, Islamic Republic of; 2Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran, Islamic Republic of

Introduction: over the time, a variety of criteria, such as acceptance rate and peer review, have been used to assess and improve ‘journal quality’. In recent years, bibliometric scores (such as Impact Factor) have become the widely used approaches for assessing ‘journal quality’. However, they do not provide an accurate quality assessment and may not be a reliable ‘journal quality’ indicator. ‘Journal quality’ is a multidimensional concept and cannot be accurately defined and assessed by a single metric and/or few factors. Thus, new criteria and methods must be developed to incorporate all dimensions of a journal.

Objectives: understanding ‘journal quality’ architecture is a prerequisite to assessing and judging this concept. Consequently, we aimed to map the current status of research in this broad area, to identify as many ‘journal quality’ criteria as possible, as well as to develop a conceptual framework for this concept.

Method: we conducted a scoping review (Arksey and O'Malley (2005), and Levac’s (2010) six-stage framework) and mapped the fragmented sources of evidence on ‘journal quality’ from database search, grey literature, and hand-searching. Braun and Clarke’s inductive thematic analysis method was used to collate and summarize the obtained data and to develop the primary conceptual model. Moreover, we consulted with 16 professional experts in order to refine findings, to evaluate the applicability, and to enhance the meaning of both quality criteria and conceptual framework. Then, we determined the weight of each criterion based on both evidence (i.e., review criteria for top health and biomedical journals) and expert opinions. Stata version 14.1 and Microsoft Excel were used to analyze the data.

Results: 116 documents met the eligibility criteria and 210 quality criteria were extracted from scoping review stage. The identified quality criteria were grouped into five themes: ethical, scientific rigor, technical, editorial structure, and promoting & indexing. The highest number of criteria reported for the ‘ethical’ (n=70) domain, and followed by ‘technical’ (n=54), ‘editorial structure’ (n=34), ‘scientific rigor’ (n=33), and ‘promoting & indexing’ (n=19). It is also noteworthy that a small percentage of the documents included in this study (27%) were empirical research, while the majority (73%) were non-empirical. Thus, there are significant gaps in the scientific literature on this topic. By using the evidence (top 50 journals) and expert opinion, we determined the priority of all criteria. We kept the criteria that received 70% agreement and eliminated the others. Finally, 148 ‘journal quality’ criteria were developed.

Conclusions: This is the first study to focus on the concept of ‘journal quality’ in the health and biomedical context. The identified criteria, including ethical, scientific rigor, technical, editorial structure, and promoting & indexing, could be applied to journals, regardless of geographical differences to enhance quality. However, in some cases, a number of criteria may not be applicable due to the journal’s internal policies and business model. Despite we found significant gaps in empirical research, our study provides a valuable basis for future research in this area. This is a step towards developing a ‘journal quality’ ranking/evaluating system.

Biography and Bibliography
Mina Moradzadeh is a PhD candidate in the Department of Medical Library and Information Science at Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. She also serves as Managing Editor at International Journal of Health Policy and Management (https://www.ijhpm.com/), the 6th-ranked journal in health policy, since 2013. Her research interests include Scientific Publishing, Peer Review, Research Impact, and Social Media.

Shahram Sedghi is a professor in the Department of Medical Library and Information Science at Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. He received his PhD in the Information Retrieval research group at the University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. The majority of his research works are qualitative studies focusing on areas such as Information Behavior, Digital Health, Knowledge Management, and Health Information Literacy.

Sirous Panahi is an associate professor in the Department of Medical Library and Information Science at Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. He received his PhD in Information studies from the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. His research interests include Social Media, Healthcare Knowledge Management, Health Library and Information Science, and Health Information Literacy.

Yunes Jahani is Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman Iran. His research interests is biostatistics.

Sahar Najafizadeh is a Managing Editor at International Journal of Health Policy and Management (https://www.ijhpm.com/), the 6th-ranked journal in health policy, since 2013.

Moradzadeh-A step towards improving the perception of journal quality criteria-138_a.pdf

Moradzadeh-A step towards improving the perception of journal quality criteria-138_b.jpg

Moradzadeh-A step towards improving the perception of journal quality criteria-138_c.docx


ID: 126 / Online Posters: 2
Online Poster
Topics: Data

Developing a platform for data sharing and request management of Iran Cohort Consortium (ICC)

Mohammad Javad Mansourzadeh1,2, Hossein Dehdarirad3, Fatemeh Sheikhshoaei3, Davood Khalili1,4

1Prevention of Metabolic Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran Iran; 2Osteoporosis Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Medical Library and Information Science, School of Allied Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 4Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Introduction

Community–based large-scale cohort studies are producing ever-increasing quantities of digital data in the course of their work which needs to be managed for both immediate and potential long-term use. Currently, 44 active cohorts are the Iran Cohort Consortium (ICC) members, and each of them has its own processes for project documentation and research data management. Since most of the Iran cohorts in ICC had a clear data management plan prior to implementation, their research data were documented over time using different approaches. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a platform for data sharing and request management of Iranian cohort data.

Aim

Our project pursued three main goals:

1- To uniform the documentation of cohort studies and standardization of their research data format and preparation of their metadata

2- To develop a web portal to provide a wealth of information on the Iran cohort studies and make them searchable to the public

3- To develop the data request and sharing management process, prepare Research Data Distribution Agreement, and track the reuse of research datasets

Method

This project had three main goals and to achieve each goal, a phase was developed. Each phase of the project is described below:

Phase 1) Dataset and documentation standardization: Out of 44 active cohorts in ICC, 11 cohort studies have announced their readiness to participate in this project. In the first phase, we prepared a protocol to standardize the process of research data management in ICC. Then, in accordance with the prepared protocol, for each project, the project-level documentation including study protocol, data collection forms, questionnaires, etc. and the data-level documentation including standardization of filing and naming of variables, metadata, and data dictionary (including the descriptions of variables, type of variables, coding, missing values, etc.) was prepared.

Phase 2) Development of Iranian cohort web portal: In this phase, a web portal will be developed for managing and sharing the ICC cohort’s data

Phase 3) Development of request management workflow: In this phase, a workflow was developed for the management of data requests in accordance with the needs of ICC members. We also developed a Research Data Distribution Agreement to facilitate the process of data sharing.
Results

In this project, we developed a protocol for ICC cohorts to uniform the documentation of cohort studies & standardization of research data format, and preparation of their metadata. Then by holding workshops for cohorts’ staffs, they will learn how to standardize and organize their research data according to the prepared protocol. The web portal will be improved in irancohorts.ir to host the research metadata and facilitate data sharing workflow.

Conclusion

We aimed to facilitate the sharing of Iran cohort studies scholarly data and the implementation of joint research projects by our platform which allows us to efficiently manage access permission to cohorts’ data and track the reuse of research datasets. Our platform is still a prototype and its effectiveness has not yet been evaluated.

Keywords: Research Data Management, Data Sharing, Cohort Study


Mansourzadeh-Developing a platform for data sharing and request management-126_a.pdf

Mansourzadeh-Developing a platform for data sharing and request management-126_b.pdf

Mansourzadeh-Developing a platform for data sharing and request management-126_c.png


ID: 154 / Online Posters: 3
Online Poster
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

A rapid COVID-19 evidence Digest was created by information specialists using a mix of automated and human processes

Emma Farrow, Nicola Pearce-Smith, James Robinson, Kester Savage

UK Health Security Agency, United Kingdom

Introduction

A COVID-19 Literature Digest produced by a small team in <our institute> (now <our institute>) was established at the beginning of the pandemic, and designed to highlight a selection of relevant COVID-19 evidence in the form of an email alert.

Aim

To provide people working on the COVID-19 pandemic response with a selection of timely summarised research papers relevant to <our country> settings, containing new data, insights or emerging trends

Method

To obtain content for the Digest, sources including PubMed, bioRxiv / medRxiv (preprints) and key journal websites are searched by 3 information specialists to find journal articles, preprints, Government reports and other types of grey literature. These references are imported to a shared Endnote library, then screened using a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) with inclusion/exclusion criteria covering relevance, quality, type of research and novelty. The use of Endnote Smart Groups reduced screening time and enabled papers from key journals or topics to be rapidly identified, but there was still a significant element of manual screening and selection decisions carried out by the information specialists. Selected papers were categorised using themes, which were adapted over time as the topics of interest changed. Short summaries are written for each paper and the Digest compiled in Outlook before circulation to 800+ subscribers. Several user surveys were conducted to obtain feedback on the content, frequency and layout of the Digest.

Results:

Over 2000 papers are imported into the shared Endnote library every week. 40-60 of these papers are selected, summarised and included in each Digest. Over 200 Digests have been produced since March 2020. Three user surveys obtained feedback which informed changes to the Digest, such as how frequently it was sent, the themes covered and how preprints were managed. A final evaluative survey will be conducted alongside an After Action Review to capture the learning and determine the impact of the Digest on subscribers’ work. The SOP and inclusion criteria are regularly revised as COVID-19 research progressed and improved. The Digest was successfully produced within the limits of available resources, for example by moving from daily to weekly publication as the amount of research grew. Close connections were established with colleagues from the COVID-19 rapid evidence team who highlighted new articles, provided selection advice or assessed the quality of papers.

Conclusion

By necessity the Digest is a rapidly created product, which needed modifying as the nature of the evidence and the available staff resources changed over time. The production of, and learning from, this COVID-19 Literature Digest will inform the monitoring, selection and dissemination of evidence for future rapid disease outbreaks.

Human touch

Although some of the Digest process is automated, human input was important. Only a small proportion of the available evidence was selected by the information specialists, and writing the summaries required an understanding of evidence context. Joining the COVID-19 rapid evidence team in 2021 led to mutual benefits, as creative connections were established with colleagues from this team and the library.


Farrow-A rapid COVID-19 evidence Digest was created by information specialists using a mix-154_a.pdf

Farrow-A rapid COVID-19 evidence Digest was created by information specialists using a mix-154_b.png
 


ID: 189 / Online Posters: 4
Online Poster
Topics: Everything interesting

IMPLEMENTATION OF ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORD (EMR) IN FEDERAL MEDICAL CENTRE, IN NIGERIA, A LOWER INCOME COUNTRY.

CHINWE JACQUELINE IZUGHA

FEDERAL MEDICAL CENTRE, EBUTE-METTA, LAGOS, NIGERIA, Nigeria

Introduction

Electronic Medical Record (EMR) is the conversion of health records from its paper based form to digital form. EMR stands for electronic medical records which are the digital equivalent of paper records, or charts at a clinician’s office. EMRs typically contain general information such as treatment and medical history about a patient as it is collected by the individual medical practice. EMR can also be defined as a digital collection of medical information about a patient which is stored on a computer system and it includes information about patient’s health history, such as diagnoses, medicines, tests, allergies, immunizations and treatment plans. EMR can be seen by all healthcare providers who are taking care of a patient. It is easier to access and update.

Aim

In the past years, there used to be lots of delays in the retrieval of patients medical records and misplacement of patients vital documents and misfiling of case notes. The spaces usually occupy by the patients’ case notes is always a big problem. It is against this background that Electronic Medical Record (EMR) was introduced in <our organization> in a lower income country to help in eliminating all these problems.

Method/ Program Description

The journey for the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) started with the creation of Information and Communication Technology Department (ICT) which was later renamed Clinical Informatics Department. This was followed by the deployment of some staff to the department. Engineers were employed for the task. Equipment for the EMR was purchased and the Software (Global Care HMS) was installed. Training of staff was done and the scanning and archiving of patients medical records were carried out gradually. Librarians play some vital roles in the EMR. They initiate the scan process and ensure the smoothness of the documents to be scanned. They check to ensure clarity of scanned documents and perform sorting and conversions where necessary. They also edit scanned documents and quality checks on scanned documents before uploading for Medical Doctors to have access to patients’ medical history. There was no constraint about Librarian having access to patients records.The Librarian has Master of Health Information Management Certificate.

Results/ Evaluation
The implementation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) commenced on the 9th of October, 2019. All the clinics and wards were involved. Different challenges were encountered in the process. Many staffs were not yet prepared for the EMR. Network issues were also encountered along the way.
Conclusion

The introduction of the EMR in <our organization> was a very big development in the history of the hospital because it will help in the digital preservation and effective management of patients medical records. It will also enable the healthcare provider to have quick access and easy retrieval of patient’s medical history. The EMR should be sustained by ensuring that staff are trained and re-trained for effective healthcare delivery. There should be back-up plans for the patients’ data base.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This EMR implementation helped all the staff to be proactive in the discharge of their duties.


IZUGHA-IMPLEMENTATION OF ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORD-189_a.docx

IZUGHA-IMPLEMENTATION OF ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORD-189_b.jpg
 


ID: 119 / Online Posters: 5
Online Poster
Topics: Everything interesting

Shifting Gears: Academic Medical Library Navigating Thru the Pandemic

Joenabie Encanto Arevalo

Ateneo de Manila University - School of Medicine and Public Health, Philippines

Introduction

This paper discusses the digital transformation of the Ateneo de Manila University - School of Medicine and Public Health (ASMPH) Library. Initially, the ASMPH Library’s mission is to provide collaborative spaces and information sources for shared expertise, learning, and discovery. The demands of today necessitated refocusing of the Library’s mission to become the ASMPHLibrary 4.0, which provides both physical and digital information sources and collaborative spaces.

The ASMPHLibrary 4.0 ensures access and connectivity for patrons. Remote and secured access to resources are of paramount importance. Protection of privacy and proprietary materials are in place. Librarians need not always be present in the physical library but must be present in the digital space at all times.

Digitization initiatives

The initiatives discussed in this article include the ASMPHLibrary 4.0 Portal, a one-stop-shop portal providing access to subscribed databases. It contains the following: Online Public Access Catalog; document request tab for materials not available in the databases; ebook/AV list tab containing a curated list of ebooks and AV materials; a tab for video tutorials; feedback form; and a reservation form for remote access to licensed statistical software. Furthermore, additional digital media channels were set up, aside from email and Facebook; such as Instagram, Twitter and Viber. Library personnel learned to use photo and video editing tools for better marketing and promotional activities. The Library also lends wi-fi devices with initial load for patrons with internet connectivity issues.

Results

The Library was able to enhance its existing digital services and collection, and add new ones, to meet patron’s demand. The digital collection and services continued to grow with the help of the community. Online orientations organized with the Student Council were converted to a 4-6-minute video-tutorials. Students’ feedback was considered in coming up with these info-mercials. Setting-up additional media channels greatly increased the Library’s interaction with the community and promoted the Library’s collection and services.

Recently, the ASMPHLibrary also resumed physical library services such as contactless circulation of books, and reservation of study spaces. As the community restrictions begin to loosen, the circulation of print materials may return to pre-pandemic operations, but the digital initiatives will continue.

Recommendations

Navigating through the pandemic is challenging enough, more so with little to no budget for digital initiatives. One strategy to initiate digital transformation is to look for low-cost solutions, such as use of Google. Google Sites can be used for creating a one-stop-shop portal. Google Drive can serve as a repository for scanned materials, considering copyright and fair use. Google Drive also provides different levels of file security. Google Forms offers convenience in counting statistics and report generation. It also helps reduce the transmission point of the virus.

Aside from marketing and promotion, the use of social media also provides venues for patrons’ feedback. Social media can also act as a bridge to meet collaborative partners, such as content providers and/or potential consortium members. Consortiums have greater negotiating and purchasing power. All these strategies are based on experience and reflection about what worked so far.

Biography and Bibliography
Mrs. Joenabie Encanto Arevalo is the librarian of the Ateneo de Manila University - School of Medicine and Public Health. She also teaches medical and health librarianship electives at the UP School of Library and Information Studies, where she also obtained her bachelor’s degree, cum laude (2004) and a master’s degree (2011) in Library and Information Science. She got her license in 2004 and ranked 5th in the licensure examination for librarians conducted by the Professional Regulatory Board for Librarians and by the Professional Regulation Commission-Philippines.

She served several posts in the Medical and Health Librarians Association of the Philippines (MAHLAP); as a member of the MAHLAP board member since 2008, and as President from 2014 to 2016. She now serves as an Adviser to the MAHLAP Board of Trustees. She also serves as secretary of the Jesuit Higher Education Library Consortium (JHELCon) from 2017 to present. She contributed a few research papers in refereed journals, and delivered paper presentations in both national and international conferences. Through MAHLAP, she helped organize various seminars, conferences, and workshops. Her interests are medical and health librarianship, medical e-resources, and data curation.

Arevalo-Shifting Gears-119_a.jpg
 
Arevalo-Shifting Gears-119_c.pdf


ID: 192 / Online Posters: 6
Online Poster
Topics: Resources and metrics

Indicators of impact for trials: A modified, e-Delphi study

Sarah R Prowse

University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom

Introduction
The success of clinical trials research is not only in scholarly output, but in the real-life benefits evidenced in patients and society beyond the academic environment. There is a growing discourse that the wider benefits of research should be assessed and valued alongside traditional performance metrics. However, impact is often presented as a linear process which inherently disregards high-risk or long-term ventures such as trials. A body of evidence on what the trials community considers indicators of impact could better support the recognition of trials research, as well as planning for impact early in the life of a trial.

Aim
The primary study aim was to build consensus among a group of experts regarding key indicators of impact to support the development of research assessments for trials. The Delphi methodology presented combines existing knowledge from experts with differing trial backgrounds, including unpublished and practical expertise. This also offers opportunity for further reflection on the performative nature of impact assessments, such as the United Kingdom’s Research Excellence Framework (REF).

Method
The Delphi technique seeks to obtain consensus on the opinions of experts through a series of structured surveys. As part of this process, the responses from each round are fed back in summarised form to the participants who are then given an opportunity to respond again to the emerging data. The methodology presented for this study is both a modified and e-Delphi approach, using digital tools to collect and analyse a pre-existing list of 57 indicators for ranking and response.

Results
From a pool of 436 trial experts publicly named on REF 2014 impact case studies, 47 individuals responded to Round 1 of the survey process. 34 of these original respondents were invited to further complete Round 2. After two rounds, 13 indicators met with consensus in and none met the criteria for consensus out. Indicators were divided across five avenues of impact: 1) advancement of knowledge, 2) clinical implementation, 3) community benefit, 4) legislation and policy, and 5) economic benefit. Of the final consensus list the majority of indicators could be found under ‘clinical implementation’ and included clinical trials; clinical/practical guidelines; clinically effective practice; improved patient outcomes; standard of care; and disease prevention/eradication.

Conclusion
The 13 indicators reaching consensus can be used as a baseline at the outset of trial planning, acting as a safeguard to see if a trial is expected to have impacts that are known and agreed upon. A list of indicators as to what the trials community considers impact can better shape and advocate for systems of monitoring, reporting and evaluation that are fit for purpose. This work can also be carried forward for discipline-specific areas of trials research, and benefits all those employed in the task of discerning impact that is credible and valued for trial assessment exercises.

Human Touch (Recommended)
The results from this study provide further insights that trialists and their teams can proactively consider when embedding impact evaluation into trials research, including elements of trial planning and stakeholder communication.

Biography and Bibliography
Sarah Prowse is a doctoral researcher and Impact Officer at the University of Aberdeen (Scotland, UK). Her research focuses on the impact of trials and how metrics used within research assessments can be better defined, measured, and implemented.

Prowse-Indicators of impact for trials-192_a.pdf
   


ID: 218 / Online Posters: 7
Online Poster
Topics: Resources and metrics

Hot Topics: Keeping Patrons in the Loop to Promote Research Engagement and Professional Growth

Jeannine Creazzo, Ryan Norman

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset, United States of America

Introduction

Hot Topics is a current awareness service, available to staff at three hospital campuses. The two librarians create, maintain, and distribute citations via email to participants on the topic(s) of their choice.
Aim

Hot Topics’ success will be reflected in meeting the following goals:

  • Improve the librarians’ workflow and increase efficiency to prevent duplicate requests and information silos.
  • Increase research engagement and resource accessibility.
  • Provide an awareness of industry trends to obtain high quality learning skills.
  • Encourage personal/professional development.
  • Continue to promote the Medical Library’s resources and services.

Method/ Program Description
In 2020, Hot Topics was launched at one campus. The librarians curated a list of initial 50 topics, referring to the Magnet and Joint Commission standards, National Patient Safety goals, industry trends, and literature search requests. They developed each topic’s search strategy, established search alerts in Medline Complete and CINAHL, and promoted the service. Promotional efforts included newsletter announcements, staff email blasts, and announcements made in meetings, house-wide flyer distribution, website announcements, and a meeting with residents. Staff register via SurveyMonkey, and select the topics of their choice and/or request new topics to receive weekly email updates regarding new articles published. In 2021, the librarians expanded and promoted the service to two additional campuses.
Results/ Evaluation

Year to date, there are 84 participants across all three campuses. The topic number has since doubled to 100. The librarians conducted the inaugural “Hot Topics Impact Survey” via SurveyMonkey, at the end of the third quarter 2021. Out of the 70 participants, 25 completed the survey (36%). 88% prefer the email delivery frequency and number of citations received. The citations’ quality meet the majority of participant’s expectations. The majority find the citations useful and relevant. 44% reported that the service impacted their personal/professional growth.
Conclusion

Based on the survey results, informal feedback, and an ongoing increase in participants, the librarians are or plan to in 2022:

  • Launch Hot Topics to another campus, which also receives library services, and conduct an initial survey of their participants.
  • Continue to both conduct user surveys and schedule ongoing evaluations of search strategies for accuracy and relevance.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Librarians personally scheduled virtual and in-person one-on-one meetings with staff and departments. Additionally, word-of-mouth endorsements from participants resulted in an increase in participants. 44% of survey respondents reported that the service influenced their personal/professional growth, which is one of the service’s aims. The librarians received informal feedback from participants, in the form of email messages and hallway conversations.

Biography and Bibliography
Jeannine Creazzo has served as the Director, Medical Library, Continuing Education, and Research at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset in Somerville, New Jersey since 2017. She earned her Master of Library and Information Science from Long Island University and her MBA from the University of Phoenix. Jeannine is a member of Delta Mu Delta, the international business honor society. A librarian for over twenty years, she is a Distinguished member of the Medical Library Association's (MLA) Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP). Jeannine’s professional activities include committee participation and leadership roles, both in the hospital environment and in the library profession.

Ryan Norman has worked as Medical Librarian at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital (RWJUH) Somerset for one year. She earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Rutgers University’s School of Arts and Sciences, and received her Masters of Information from the Rutgers University School of Communication and Information. Ryan is a member of the Medical Library Association (MLA)’s Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP).

Teolis, M., Poletti, E., Creazzo, J., Steele, F., Castelli, D., Mokonyama, J. (2021) “Hospital Librarians Meet the Challenges of the COVID-19 Pandemic”, Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 40:4, 408-420

Creazzo, J., Bakker, C., Koos, J., Jo, P., Alpi, K. (2021) “Report from the Field: Researching Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery Usage by Health Sciences Libraries during the COVID-19 Pandemic.” Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve, 29:3-5:171-179

Creazzo-Hot Topics-218_a.pdf

Creazzo-Hot Topics-218_b.pdf
 


ID: 106 / Online Posters: 8
Online Poster
Topics: Everything interesting

An NHS library service working with our Trust's sustainability group

Adam Tocock

Barts Health, United Kingdom

Introduction
The NHS is committed to becoming the world's first "net zero" national health service, and there is a lot of scope for knowledge and library services to contribute towards this goal.
Aim
To explain how Barts Health NHS Trust's Knowledge and Library Services (KLS) became inolved with our Trust's sustainabilty group after seeing their regular meetings advertised on the staff intranet; to describe the services and resources we provide for the group (adding their suggested texts to our collection, drafting the group's terms-of-reference, etc.); and to explain step-by-step how our involvement led to us creating a website for the group.

Method/ Program Description
A showcase of the website Barts Health KLS created for Green at Barts Health, via screenshots and narrative explaining design decisions: https://bartshealth-nhs.libguides.com/GreenatBartsHealth

Results/ Evaluation
Ongoing challenges and issues will be highlighted; including our relationship with our organisation's offical Comms department, keeping the site up-to-date, and organising content. Other work and collaboration on sustainabiltiy in healthcare libraries sector also signposted.

Conclusion

The impact of the website will be considered in light of new developments at our organisation such as the Trust's green plan going to the board, and recent provision of a platform on the trust's intranet. Advances more generally at a national level will also be considered.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This project is being brought to delegates' attention in the hope that it will inspire them to do better, to collaborate further with their organisations' sustainabiltiy groups to make their organisations more sustainable, and to collaborate with each other to make our profession more sustainable. Climate change is an existential threat to humanity and touches us all, we need to commit ourselves to address it.


Tocock-An NHS library service working with our Trusts sustainability group-106_a.jpg

Tocock-An NHS library service working with our Trusts sustainability group-106_b.pdf

Tocock-An NHS library service working with our Trusts sustainability group-106_c.docx


ID: 127 / Online Posters: 9
Online Poster
Topics: Education

Public health literacy: a partnership between the Biomedical library of Alessandria and Wikipedia

Antonio Maconi1, Federica Viazzi1, Mariasilvia Como1, Mariateresa Dacquino1, Marco Chemello2

1Infrastruttura ricerca formazione innovazione, Azienda Ospedaliera SS. Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo, Italy; 2Wikimedia Italia - Associazione per la diffusione della conoscenza libera

Introduction

The SS. SS. Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo is a 16th century institution with historical heritage.The cultural heritage is studied and valued by the Biomedical Library staff and the Medical Humanities Study Centre. The Hospital has also 14 active research units that have published in 2021 164 scientific articles in "impacted" or indexed journals.

Aim

The aim of the collaboration project is to build activities that can be mutually beneficial for both parties involved. We want valorizing the images of historical heritage, as well as contributing to Wikipedia and the dissemination of updated, verified and reliable medical information, especially in this historical period dominated by infodemia.

Method

The project was developed in two phases: the first at the end of 2020 when the hospital presented the Wikimedia Italia Association with a letter of intent that was turned into an agreement in May 2021. The first phase involved uploading on Wikimedia Commons images of the historical heritage.

The second phase involved healthcare professionals in the development of a 'Health Literacy' project. The medical staff helped the librarian, an expert in Wikipedia editing, to revise and update Wikipedia articles in Italian. This project was embedded into the activities of Bibliopride 2021, an event organized by the Italian Library Association (AIB) for the 2030 Agenda.

Evaluation

42 files were uploaded, which gained 224,397 views and are used in 11 different language versions of Wikipedia. 24 images were uploaded for the 2019 Wikiscience Competition, and one of an Aspergillus fumigatus mushroom earned 2nd place as a national finalist. In December 2021, this image will be part of a collaborative exhibition with the public library developed for primary and secondary schools. The edits were 262 on 67 Wikipedia pages and the views of pages are an average of 60 per week.

Conclusion

The Wikipedia free encyclopedia is the most used online reference to retrieve informations by the general public and it is a powerful tool to give visibility to scientific production and value the historical heritage. The proposal to collaborate with the Free Encyclopedia has been welcomed by health professionals, however to contribute more effectively it will be necessary to set up an independent working group. To do so, the Biomedical Library is organizing an Editathon (a live marathon of contribution) in collaboration with the <our organization> .

The contribution of health professionals to update and enrich the articles could be a good way to improve the health literacy spreading verified and reliable medical information in the Italian community.

Bibliography

Omer Benjakob, Rona Aviram, e Jonathan Sobel, «Citation Needed? Wikipedia Bibliometrics during the First Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic», preprint (Scientific Communication and Education, 1 marzo 2021), https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.03.01.433379;

Lauren A Maggio et al., «Reader Engagement with Medical Content on Wikipedia», ELife 9 (6 marzo 2020): e52426, https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.52426;

Joshua M. Nicholson et al., «Measuring the Quality of Scientific References in Wikipedia: An Analysis of More than 115M Citations to over 800 000 Scientific Articles», The FEBS Journal 288, n. 14 (luglio 2021): 4242–48, https://doi.org/10.1111/febs.15608.


Maconi-Public health literacy-127_a.pdf
   


ID: 195 / Online Posters: 10
Online Poster
Topics: Resources and metrics

A bibliometric analysis of publications and citation trends of Chinese articles in mental health (1990-2019).

Francesca Severino1, Valeria Scotti2, Tianhong Zhang3, Yuchen Zheng3, Annalisa De Silvestri2

1ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy; 2Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; 3Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

Introduction

The recognition of the importance of mental health as a health-target to be pursued at a global level has received additional theoretical legitimacy through its inclusion in the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable development. The theoretical axiom - mental health as a development priority - is today expected to drive the focus of research efforts and orient the future policies and funds expenditures in all countries worldwide, at global and local level.

Aim

This research aims at quantifying the China footprint on global mental health by performing a bibliometric analysis on the Chinese mental-health related publications in English-language SCI-E and SSCI journals from 1990 to 2019, measuring the impact of this research at the global scientific community level.

Method

We performed a search on the Web of Science (WoS) using 7 mental and substance use disorders according to their global prevalence, as per estimates of the Global Burden of Disease 2019. A dataset including the overall number of publications for 7 diseases was created and exported in InCites. The dataset was analyzed on the basis of 11 research areas (WoS categories) to which mental health topic is associated in SCI-E and SSCI journals in WoS. We further extracted publications that originated in mainland China. The citational trends over time are calculated with nonparametric test for trends across ordered groups. The impact of the Chinese scientific production is provided by the number of citations received at the global scientific community level, both as average and percentile.

Results/ Evaluation

From 1990 to 2020 the overall Chinese scientific production in mental health has been generally increasing, reaching the highest growth in the last decade. A statistically significant increase (p<0.001) is reported in Chinese articles regarding ‘depression’, ‘bipolar disorders’ and ‘schizophrenia’. Published Chinese research is mostly included in SCI-E journals. There is a substantial overlap regarding the average number of citations of Chinese articles and the rest of the world. Despite the increasing trend, the percentage of Chinese articles in mental health on the overall scientific production worldwide is below 10%.

Conclusion

Chinese published research results to be more prolific in articles concerning neurobiological aspects of mental disorders, falling into SCI-E journals. Otherwise, articles deepening psycho-social aspects of mental research and social determinants of mental health are very limited. Although the publication of articles in internationally indexed journals in not exhaustive of China’s scientific activity in global mental health, it allows an assessment of the impact of this knowledge at the global scientific community level and could reflect the Chinese capacity to benefit from research conducted globally.

Human Touch

The work of the biomedical librarian is no longer just delegated to some more traditional, day-to-day functions (document delivery, bibliographic research). Bibliometrics, bibliometric indices, and the platforms that provide them have become tools for both research evaluation and researchers. The application of bibliometrics to the evaluation of more complex scenarios allows to increase the librarian's skills and knowledge in the use of these platforms

Biography and Bibliography
I have a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science. Since 2009 I have been working as a biomedical librarian at the Scientific Documentation Center of the Research and Healthcare Institution San Matteo Foundation General Hospital of Pavia. Throughout these years I have been organising conferences, orchestrating courses, giving lectures on bibliometric indicators and on the main bibliographic databases. About five years ago, I met the term ‘Altmetrics’ for the first time and found out it was an evaluation method for both subscription journals and for scientific production/scholarly output. And it sure was Love At First Sight. Thereafter I have been engaged in alternative metrics, social media, and all aspects of scientific research. I have been reelected Italian Representative of the Council dell’EAHIL 2019-2022, second term, and also, I am the cofounder of the Sig Evaluation And Metrics Group at Eahil. Get more on me at: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9240-2901

Severino F, Scotti V, Zhang T, Zheng Y, De Silvestri A. A bibliometric analysis of international publications and citation trends of articles in mental health produced by Chinese institutions in mainland China (1990-2019). Glob Ment Health (Camb). 2021 Sep 28;8:e37. doi: 10.1017/gmh.2021.35. PMID: 34631113; PMCID: PMC8482443.

Severino-A bibliometric analysis of publications and citation trends of Chinese articles-195_a.pdf

Severino-A bibliometric analysis of publications and citation trends of Chinese articles-195_b.ppt
 


ID: 212 / Online Posters: 11
Online Poster
Topics: Everything interesting

A survey on job burnout among hospital librarians

Saeideh Valizadeh-Haghi, Fatemeh Sohani, Hamed Nasibi-Sis

Department of Medical Library and Information Sciences, School of Allied Medical Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction

The library is one of the main pillars of information in society. To succeed in disseminating information, the libraries must have a dynamic space and a favorable environment. Librarians should also be provided with an environment that is stress-free.

Aim

The aim of this study was to survey the burnout of hospital librarians of <our institute>.

Method/ Program Description

This research is a cross-sectional survey. The study population was the hospital librarians of <our institute>. The "Maslach & Jackson" burnout questionnaire was used to collect data. The SPSS software and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the collected data.

Results/ Evaluation

The results showed that the mean score of burnouts is also below average. Moreover, the decrease in personal performance with a mean score of 3.71 is above the expected average. Additionally, two dimensions of emotional fatigue and depersonalization with a mean score of 1.95 and 1.35 are below the average score, respectively.

Conclusion

In general, the burnout of hospital librarians of <our institute> is in a good condition, however, maintaining and improving the existing situation in libraries is very important. Measures that help improve the organizational climate and burnout of librarians may include improving the payment system for librarians, establishing friendly relations between librarians and administrators, and managers' support for librarians.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Biography and Bibliography
Dr. Saeideh Valizadeh-Haghi works as an assistant professor at the Department of Medical Library and Information Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Her research interests include digital health, library performance evaluation, health information-seeking behavior, website quality assessment, mHealth, and eHealth literacy. She
has published several research papers in international journals.

Fatemeh Sohani has got her Master's Degree in Medical Library and Information Science from Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Her areas of interest are service quality assessment and human resource management in medical libraries.

Hamed Nasibi-Sis has got his Master’s Degree in Medical Library and Information Science from Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. His areas of interest are medical library evaluation, scientific social networks, Altmetrics, and scientometrics.

1. Valizadeh-Haghi S, Khazaal Y, Rahmatizadeh S. Health websites on COVID-19: are they readable and credible enough to help public self-care?. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA. 2021 Jan 1;109(1):75.

2. Nasibi-Sis H, Valizadeh-Haghi S, Shekofteh M. ResearchGate Altmetric scores and Scopus bibliometric indicators among lecturers. Performance Measurement and Metrics. 2020 Nov 13.

3. Valizadeh-Haghi S, Rahmatizadeh S, Soleimaninejad A, Shirazi SF, Mollaei P. Are health websites credible enough for elderly self-education in the most prevalent elderly diseases?. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making. 2021 Dec;21(1):1-9.

Valizadeh-Haghi-A survey on job burnout among hospital librarians-212_a.pdf

Valizadeh-Haghi-A survey on job burnout among hospital librarians-212_b.pdf

Valizadeh-Haghi-A survey on job burnout among hospital librarians-212_c.pdf
 
Date: Thursday, 09/June/2022
10:00am - 10:15amLive Opening Online Conference
Session Chair: Wichor Bramer
Session Chair: Hans Ket

The chairs of LOC and IPC and an a representative of the EAHIL board welcome you to the online days for EAHIL 2022. 

10:15am - 11:30amOW 1: Online Workshop
 
ID: 206 / OW 1: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Deduplication of search results in EndNote – effort and problems with different methods

Volker Braun

Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Germany

Biography and Bibliography
Medical librarian since 2006 (German diploma degree)
Literature searches since 2015 for employees and doctoral students

Braun-Deduplication of search results in EndNote – effort and problems with different methods-206_a.pptx

Braun-Deduplication of search results in EndNote – effort and problems with different methods-206_b.pdf
 
11:30am - 12:30pmSIG - Evidence-Based Information
2:00pm - 2:30pmO 1.1: Online Discussion Information Retrieval
Session Chair: Louise Farragher

The abstracts will not be presented live during this session. You can are advised to view the recorded presentations before this session. Presenters will briefly introduce themselves and then discuss their research, and answers questions.

 
ID: 156 / O 1.1: 1
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Exploring the impact of searching on priority screening in broad topic areas

Claire Stansfield, Alison O'Mara-Eves

EPPI-Centre, UCL Social Research Institute, University College London, United Kingdom

Aim: To compare the performance of priority screening in terms of the number of citations needed to screen at different levels of recall of relevant citations.

Method: A series of retrospective analyses were undertaken to compare the performance of priority screening between batches of references that differ by their sensitivity. We examined the effect of screening volume and topic breadth for four review topics where research terminology is diverse (digital interventions for reducing alcohol and drug use, lyme disease research, online content of eating disorders, and embedded researchers). Simulations of priority screening were undertaken in EPPI-Reviewer and results analysed in Excel.

Results: Measures: the average number of references to be screened at 90, 95, 99 and 100% recall of the included studies. We will present the results of the analysis, which is ongoing. Early indications from one case study indicates that to achieve above 95% recall, manual screening is considerably increased for lower precision searches.
Conclusions: In some cases, broader searches are more feasible than designing a narrower search, even if the latter can achieve potentially higher recall with fewer records screened, owing to the complexity of designing sensitive narrow searches. This analysis is informative of the opportunities and limitations of taking this approach.

Human touch

This research improves understanding between the implications of search strategies and the volume of results on utilising machine learning technology to reduce the human effort in manual screening.

Biography and Bibliography
Biographies

Claire Stansfield is an information specialist and Senior Research Fellow with research interests in information retrieval methods for systematic research reviews that inform public policy.
Alison O'Mara-Eves is an Associate Professor and specialises in methods for systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Her interests include evaluating the use of emerging text mining techniques for facilitating the production of systematic reviews.

Bibliography from related research:

Stansfield, C, Stokes, G, Thomas, J. Applying machine classifiers to update searches: Analysis from two case studies. Res Syn Meth. 2021; 1- 13. doi:10.1002/jrsm.1537

O'Mara-Eves A, Thomas J, McNaught J, Miwa M, Ananiadou S. Using text mining for study identification in systematic reviews: a systematic review of current approaches. Syst Rev. 2015 Jan 14;4:5. doi: 10.1186/2046-4053-4-5. Review. Erratum in: Syst Rev. 2015;4:59

Stansfield-Exploring the impact of searching on priority screening-156_a.mp4
   


ID: 1223 / O 1.1: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Developing searchRxiv: An international transdisciplinary repository for search strategies

Neal Haddaway2, Melissa L. Rethlefsen1, Cristina Ashby3

1University of New Mexico Health Sciences Library & Informatics Center, United States of America; 2Stockholm Environment Institute; 3CABI

Introduction
Documenting, saving, and sharing search strategies is an important component of transparent reporting for systematic reviews. It is also helpful for individual practice, enabling valuable search “blocks” on a myriad of topics to be shared, modified, and reused. Though documentation and sharing are critical, these activities have been scattered across dozens of resources, from individual journal supplemental files to, rarely, institutional repositories. Shared search block resources that have been developed previously have never been adopted broadly; successful platforms for documentation and sharing have been local.
Aim
We sought to develop a transdisciplinary platform to share search strategies and their documentation.
Method/ Program Description
We collaborated with CABI to develop searchRxiv, a new subject agnostic platform for documenting and sharing search strategies. Initial conversations led to the development of a proposal for a standardised file type for documenting systematic searches, which outlined the key background issues shaping the platform, including the current state of poor reporting quality of search strategies, the need for librarians to receive credit for their intellectual contributions, and a lack of accessibility to search strategies as a contributor to research waste. We proposed creating a platform which would: improve accuracy of search strategy documentation, create citable records for each search strategy, and be openly available to improve accessibility. We established an Advisory Group to provide feedback on the proposal, data elements, and standards required for maximum benefit and reproducibility. 27 data elements were proposed after review by the Advisory Group.
Results/ Evaluation
Using the initial proposal, plus the data elements and standards proposed by the core group and the Advisory Group, CABI developed searchRxiv (searcharxiv.org) in mid-2021, built on CABI's existing technology infrastructure. searchRxiv enables individuals to create a DOI-stamped record of a search strategy or a search block. Fields captured include title, the search strategy, the date of the search, update dates, the review question, a description, keywords, validation information, whether the search was peer reviewed, links to publications, and database details.
Conclusion

searchRxiv remains in active development as feedback from the user community is received. Long-term, the vision for searchRxiv is to connect it to major search platforms to enable automatic uploading to searchRxiv to improve documentation.
Human Touch (Recommended)


Haddaway-Developing searchRxiv-1223_a.pdf

Haddaway-Developing searchRxiv-1223_b.pptx
 


ID: 1120 / O 1.1: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Reducing systematic review burden using Deduklick: a novel, automated, reliable, and explainable deduplication algorithm

Nikolay Borissov1,2, Quentin Haas1,2, Beatrice Minder3, Doris Kopp-Heim3, Marc von Gernler4, Heidrun Janka4, Douglas Teodoro5,6, Poorya Amini1,2

1Risklick AG, Spin-off University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 2CTU Bern, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 3Public Health & Primary Care Library, University Library of Bern, University of Bern, Switzerland; 44 Medical Library, University Library of Bern, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 5University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland, Geneva, Switzerland; 6Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

ABSTRACT

Background

Identifying and removing reference duplicates when conducting systematic reviews (SRs) remains a major, time-consuming issue for authors who manually check for duplicates using built-in features in citation managers. To address issues related to manual deduplication, we developed an automated, efficient, and rapid artificial intelligence (AI)-based algorithm named Deduklick. Deduklick combines natural language processing (NLP) algorithms with a set of rules created by expert information specialists.

Methods

Deduklick’s deduplication uses a multistep algorithm of data normalization, calculated a similarity score, and identified unique and duplicate references based on metadata fields, such as title, authors, journal, DOI, year, issue, volume, and pages. We measured and compared Deduklick’s capacity to accurately detect duplicates with the information specialists’ standard, manual duplicate removal process using EndNote on eight heterogeneous datasets. Using a sensitivity analysis, the efficiency and noise of both methods were manually cross-compared.

Findings

Following deduplication and comparing performance measurements, Deduklick achieved an average recall of 99·51%, an average precision of 100·00%, and average F1 score of 99·75%. In contrast, the manual deduplication process achieved an average recall of 88·65%, an average precision of 99·95%, and an average F1 Score of 91·98%. Deduklick achieved equal to higher expert-level performance on duplicate removal. It also preserved a high metadata quality, and drastically diminished the time spent on analysis.

Interpretation

Deduklick represents an efficient, transparent, ergonomic, and time-saving solution for searching and removing duplicates in SRs. Deduklick could therefore simplify SRs production and represent important advantages for scientists, including saving time, increasing accuracy, reducing costs, and contributing to quality SRs.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Automated, Reliable and Explainable Deduplication of trials and publications metadata, part of systematic review process.


Borissov-Reducing systematic review burden using Deduklick-1120_a.pptx

Borissov-Reducing systematic review burden using Deduklick-1120_b.pdf

Borissov-Reducing systematic review burden using Deduklick-1120_c.mp4


ID: 1169 / O 1.1: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Use and benefit of citation tracking techniques in evidence synthesis: a scoping review

Christian Appenzeller-Herzog1, Julian Hirt2,3,4, Thomas Nordhausen3, Hannah Ewald1

1University Medical Library, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 2Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital Basel, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 3International Graduate Academy, Institute for Health and Nursing Science, Medical Faculty, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany; 4Institute of Applied Nursing Science, Department of Health, Eastern Switzerland University of Applied Sciences (formerly FHS St.Gallen), St.Gallen, Switzerland

Introduction
Citation tracking techniques can be used as supplementary search methods in systematic reviews. They aim at collecting cited and citing references from pertinent references that are already known. Evidence-based recommendations on how and when to optimally use citation tracking are needed to guide systematic review workflows.
Aim
This scoping review maps the benefit of citation tracking in systematic literature searching for health-related topics (1).
Method/ Program Description
Methodological studies on evidence retrieval by citation tracking in health-related systematic literature searching with no restrictions on study design, language, and publication date were eligible. We searched MEDLINE, Web of Science Core Collection, CINAHL, LLISFT, and LISTA. Additionally, we performed web searching via Google Scholar as well as backward and forward citation tracking of included studies using Google Scholar, Scopus, and Web of Science. Experts were contacted for additional eligible studies. Two reviewers independently assessed reference eligibility. Data extraction and analysis were performed by one reviewer and double-checked by another.
Results/ Evaluation
We identified 47 eligible studies that were published between 1985 and 2021. Studies came mostly from the UK (n=17, 37%) or the US (n=15, 33%). The aims of the studies were to assess (i) benefit or effectiveness of citation tracking (e.g., number and proportion of studies included in a systematic review uniquely via citation tracking), (ii) technical applications of citation tracking (e.g., using Web of Science vs. Google Scholar), and (iii) to compare different citation tracking methods (e.g., direct vs. indirect citation tracking), or a combination thereof. Full scoping review results will be available in early 2022.
Conclusion

The preliminary results show that almost 50 studies published in the last 36 years assessed citation tracking for health-related evidence retrieval. The full results of this scoping review will inform an international online Delphi study aiming at the development of recommendations for citation tracking in systematic literature searching (1). For example, we hope to derive guidance as to when which citation tracking technique is likely to be particularly effective and how it should be conducted.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Biography and Bibliography
1. Hirt J, Nordhausen T, Appenzeller-Herzog C, Ewald H. Using citation tracking for systematic literature searching - study protocol for a scoping review of methodological studies and a Delphi study [version 3; peer review: 2 approved]. F1000Res 2021; 9:1386.

Appenzeller-Herzog-Use and benefit of citation tracking techniques in evidence synthesis-1169_a.pptx
   


ID: 1175 / O 1.1: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Development and validation of a database filter for study size

Sabrina Gunput, Wichor Bramer

Erasmus MC, Netherlands, The

Introduction
Researchers performing systematic reviews often express the desire to limit the search results to a certain study size: "I want to include only studies of more than 100 patients". While we of course can discuss about the validity of such a request, limiting the search results to match the inclusion criteria can reduce the burden of screening for reviewers.

Aim
The aim of our study was to develop a filter in embase.com and Medline Ovid to retrieve references above a certain threshhold of sample size. We compared the effectivenss of our filter in development using existing systematic reviews that report using sample size as an inclusion criteria.

Method/ Program Description
Together with researchers who expressed the desire to limit search results to a certain number of patients we constructed preliminary filters which were tested on the spot by evaluating the patient numbers of relevant references that had not been retrieved. If the patient numbers matched the inclusion criteria, the filter was adapted to retrieve the missed articles. After several rounds of improvement of the filter the filter was then tested against existing systematic reviews that used sample size as inclusion criteria but did not limit their search to a sample size.

Results/ Evaluation

The filter that was developed consists mainly of truncated numbers in proximity with words such as patients, cases, adults, females etc and phrase like "n=". The filter can and should be adapted to the research topic by combining these truncated numbers with specific terms for diseases, interventions or body parts of interest such as melanomas, surgeries, eyes or knees. The sensitivity of the filter as evaluated on existing systematic reviews was at least 94%. The references that were not retrieved were older articles that did not include the study size in their abstract.

Conclusion

The study size filter is a good way to limit search results to a certain number of patients. It is not 100% sensitive, but few filters are. Current guidelines for abstract formats advice authors to include in their abstract the number of patients in their research. We therefore expect the sensitivity of the filters only to improve for newer studies. A limitation is that the filters are only available in the interfaces of embase.com and Ovid and cannot be translated into PubMed, as the filter uses proximity operators which are not available in PubMed.

Human Touch (Recommended)

With the study size filter the burden of screening for systematic reviews can be greatly reduced.


Gunput-Development and validation of a database filter for study size-1175_a.pptx

Gunput-Development and validation of a database filter for study size-1175_b.pdf
 


ID: 1174 / O 1.1: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Information specialists : guardians of scientific output of their institute

Wichor Bramer

Erasmus MC, Netherlands, The

Introduction
Researchers from many institutes, both academic and non-academix perform and publish systematic reviews. Many of these institutes have a medical library that offers SR services to their researchers. Sometimes researchers seek assistance but cannot find it, or they fail to seek assistance, yet they will still pursue their review. Thus, many systematic reviews are published without assistance of a medical librarian.
Aim
Our aim is to investigate barriers to using assistance from a medical library, and to develop ideas how we can improve the percentage of SRs that are assisted by medical libraries.
Method
We surveyed corresponding authors of systematic reviews from researchers from university hospitals. We asked them whether or not they had used assistance from a search specialist. If they had not used assistance we asked further for the reasons and barriers for not asking for assistance. We surveyed medical librarians from university hospitals about the percentage of SR projects in their institute that they serve. We will investigate the barriers to serving all requests.
Results/ Evaluation
The involvement of information specialists in Systematic review varies substantially. In some organizations 100% of all searches for systematic reviews are developed by information specialists, while in other organizations almost no review is assisted by the library. The most important limiting factor for information specialists is not having enough capacity to do all searches. In many cases researchers are not aware of the option to ask an information specialist for help, or the researchers think they have enough skills to do the searches themselves. The vast majority of information specialists think it is very important that information specialists are involved in systematic reviews prior to publication.

Almost half of the responding systematic review authors have never used a librarian for their systematic reviews. Many are unaware the information specialists can assist them with searches. Many organizations do not have a medical library, or the library does not offer assistence with searches. Systematic review authors are much less convinced of the need of involving an information specialist in systematic reviews that information specilists do.
Conclusion

At our institute we assist 90% of the systematic reviews, thus improving the scientific quality of the publications. However, when we are asked to do peer review of systematic reviews we see SRs from university employees based on inferieor searches that have been developed without the assistance of a librarian. The aim of our research is to inspire medical librarians to become guardians of their organization's systematic review output either by offering peer review of researchers developed searches, or by offering librarian-mediated searches. That way each SR project should be based on a high quality search from the start of the project.

Human Touch (Recommended)

We hope to inspire the audience to reach out to their researchers and offer those working on systematic reviews their help. This will increase the overall quality of published systematic reviews and thus of the treatments that are based on them.


Bramer-Information specialists-1174_a.pptx

Bramer-Information specialists-1174_b.pdf
 
 
2:30pm - 3:00pmO 1.2: Online Discussion Education
Session Chair: Tiina Marketta Heino

The abstracts will not be presented live during this session. You can are advised to view the recorded presentations before this session. Presenters will briefly introduce themselves and then discuss their research, and answers questions.

 
ID: 217 / O 1.2: 1
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Active Learning and Exploration in Online Learning: Incorporating Virtual Escape Rooms in One-Shot Sessions

Julia Martyniuk

University of Toronto, Canada

Active learning is an important aspect in ensuring students’ understanding and retention of instructional material. This presentation will review the successes and challenges of incorporating active learning opportunities in online one-shot instruction sessions, and focus on the role escape rooms play as an active learning technique. The case example of a specific one-shot library session, where medical graduate students searched for and accessed information and resources by way of a group escape room activity, will be highlighted. This presentation will underscore how escape rooms can be applied to orient students to academic libraries, thereby fostering engagement and interactivity when learning new content.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify how escape rooms can be applied in online learning environments
  • Implement active learning techniques that encourage exploration of instructional material, and reinforces learning
Biography and Bibliography
I am an academic liaison librarian focusing on teaching and learning, especially as it relates to information and digital literacy. My research focus since becoming an academic librarian has focused on the digital landscape, including digital privacy and security, and how to best prepare students in becoming full digital citizens once they graduate.

Martyniuk-Active Learning and Exploration in Online Learning-217_a.mp4
   


ID: 170 / O 1.2: 2
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Delivering the NHS Knowledge for Healthcare Learning Academy

Dominic Gilroy

Health Education England, United Kingdom

Introduction

In December 2021 Health Education England launched the NHS Knowledge for Healthcare Learning Academy providing quality assured learning opportunities tailored for the healthcare library and knowledge workforce in England.

Aim

The Academy has the following aims:

  • Enhanced visibility and accessibility for our learning offers
  • Strengthening of our existing offers through robust processes
  • Increased clarity over learning outcomes and course content
  • Added value through accreditation by our professional body
  • Increased esteem of employers and stakeholders

Program Description

A key element of the new Learning Academy is accreditation from our professional body CILIP: The Library and Information Association.

As part of the accreditation process Learning Academy short courses were mapped to CILIP’s Professional Knowledge and Skills Base (PKSB). The PKSB charts the skills and knowledge areas required for those working in the information, knowledge, library and data professions. It is a tool available to aid career development and to identify training needs.

HEE worked with CILIP during 2020-21 to refresh the PKSB. This ensured that the tool captured skills and knowledge associated with new and emerging digital and data technologies. A key driver and reference source for the work was CILIP’s Research Report: The impact of AI, machine learning, automation and robotics on the information profession. HEE can therefore be assured that its learning and development offers are being assessed against the latest and most up-to-date benchmark in terms of the skills and knowledge required by the profession particularly around digital and data skills.

The demand for digital and data skills is evidenced by the over 70 NHS knowledge and library professionals benefiting from the software and data skills provided through our Library Carpentry offers during 2021. HEE works with Manchester University to develop a Postgraduate Certificate in Clinical Data Science. An experienced knowledge and library specialist is working with the team to ensure the modules reflect the needs of our workforce, to identify gaps in provision, and to flap any associated learning opportunities.

Evaluation

Work has been undertaken with renowned expert in impact evaluation David Streatfield to develop and evaluation mechanism for the new Learning Academy. These measures will be finalized during the first twelve months of the work of the academy and used to determine success.

Conclusion

The Learning Academy provides a great opportunity to continue to develop a high-quality learning offer for our healthcare knowledge and library specialist workforce. The Learning Academy will continue to develop and expand its offers over the coming years ensuring that knowledge and library workforce are able to meet the evolving needs of the NHS.

Human Touch (Recommended)

An increasing element of our offer will be through e-learning. Nevertheless, we recognize the value of the human touch in learning and although face-to-face learning opportunities have been lacking recently due to the pandemic, we have tried to ensure that synchronous online learning has been offered in its place. Many of these offers include break-out and discussion sessions with the opportunity for networking, something which many of our delegates value greatly.

Biography and Bibliography
Dominic Gilroy leads the Workforce Planning and Development Workstream of Knowledge for Healthcare, Health Education England's strategic development plan for healthcare knowledge and library services in England.

He has over 20 years experience of working in healthcare libraries within the NHS. He also serves on CILIP's Professional Registration Panel reviewing applications for Certification, Chartership and Fellowship.

Gilroy-Delivering the NHS Knowledge for Healthcare Learning Academy-170_a.pptx
   


ID: 1213 / O 1.2: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Developing systematic review expertise: bridging between theory and practice

Marshall Dozier

University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Introduction
The development of methods knowledge, skills and expertise to carry out robust systematic reviews (SRs) requires both an understanding of the underlying research principles and practical experience in design and application of the methods. Information specialists often provide training and guidance in SR planning and methods to students and researchers. The work presented here will give insights into the lived experience of novice systematic reviewers as they become proficient reviewers, and will enable those of use providing support or training to guide other novice reviewers on what to expect and plan to incorporate on their own learning journeys.
Aim
The aim of this evaluation is to map the learning journeys that bridge introductory SR training and the development of proficiency in practice.
Method/ Program Description
We offer Master of Public Health students with a credit-bearing course introducing the principles of SR methods, and providing light-touch practice of each phase of the review process, from question and criteria definition through to summarising findings. The course can only provide introductory-level skills that prepare students to be able to plan their own SR projects, and that more in-depth learning needs to happen while the students carry out SRs of their own. Within our institute we also have an evidence synthesis research group that carries out various review types, from rapid reviews and standalone SRs, to living reviews. We give students who have completed the SR course opportunities to participate in review teams with the research group. Once the students have developed both technical and soft skills, they can take on more challenging roles to enhance their expertise, such as review lead roles.
Results/ Evaluation
We have begun gathering reflective reports from our student and alumni collaborators, and plan to enrich and expand on these early data with focus-group-like discussions. These qualitative data will be analysed thematically.
Conclusion

We have not completed our evaluation, but early indications of learning journey elements from the reflective reports point to:

  • Access to mentoring from more experienced reviewers is valuable
  • Access to peer support and shared learning is valuable
  • Need to develop problem-solving skills to address research design and implementation decisions
  • Need to develop proficiency in relevant software tools needed
  • Need to develop various communication skills for teamwork, collaboration, oral and written expression of findings to different target audiences

Human Touch (Recommended)

building research capacity, supporting early career researchers, creating a learning community

Biography and Bibliography
Marshall Dozier leads a team of Academic Support Librarians working to support the Library in delivering the University's strategies for learning, teaching and research within the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. Marshall offers specialist library support to Deaneries within the Edinburgh Medical School and NHS in Lothian.

Student co-authors will be added.

Dozier-Developing systematic review expertise-1213_a.pptx
   


ID: 177 / O 1.2: 4
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Integrating evidence-based medicine skills into a medical school curriculum: a quantitative outcomes assessment

Laura Marie Menard, Amy Blevins

Indiana University School of Medicine, United States of America

Introduction

Faculty are increasingly being called upon to teach medical students the skills necessary to have a strong foundation in evidence-based medicine (EBM) before they move on to the professional phase of their education. All too often, the expectation is that these skills can be imparted in a class or two when the curriculum allows. Prior to the inception of this study, our institution had been teaching EBM within a discrete 2-month time period during medical students’ first year. During a large-scale curricular overhaul, the approach to teaching EBM was changed to a more scaffolded, integrated approach with sessions being taught over the course of two years. In this study, we assess the differential impact of these two approaches to teaching EBM in the first two years of medical school.

Aim

This research project aims to determine the potential differential impact of two curricular approaches to teaching EBM on student performance on an EBM assignment administered during the first year of clerkship. A meaningful result would be any statistically significant difference in scores on the assignment given to measure student performance.

Method/ Program Description

In order to assess and compare student learning under the different curricula, the PI and a team of five faculty members used a modified version of the previously validated Fresno rubric to grade three years’ worth of EBM assignments given to students in clerkship rotations 1-3 (n = 481) during the Internal Medicine clerkship. EBM performance in three separate student cohorts were examined. Assignments were anonymized before being randomly assigned to graders. Prior to grading, all graders were required to attend two norming sessions in order to achieve consensus on interpreting and applying the rubric consistently to sample assignments.

Results/ Evaluation

Four hundred and eighty-one assignments were graded. Mean scores were compared for individual questions and cumulative scores using a one-way Welch ANOVA test. Overall, students performed .99 of a point better on the assignment from Year One (Y1), prior to EBM curriculum integration to Year Three (Y3), subsequent to EBM integration (p= <.001). Statistically significant improvement was seen on questions measuring students’ ability to formulate a clinical question and critically appraise medical evidence. Additionally, on USMLE Step 1, we found that student scores on the EBM portion of the exam improved from Y1 to Y3.

Conclusion

Results of this study suggest that taking a scaffolded, curriculum-integrated approach to EBM instruction during the pre-clinical years increases student retention of and ability to apply EBM concepts to patient care. Overall, this study provides a foundation for new research and practice seeking to improve EBM instruction.

Human Touch (Recommended)

The use of EBM skills by healthcare practitioners has been shown to improve patient care outcomes worldwide. Over the past few years, especiallt in light of the challenges posed by COVID-19, it has become increasingly apparent that it is imperative to impart these skills to our students. This study provides a best practices blueprint for the teaching of EBM in medical school.

Biography and Bibliography
Laura Menard is the Assistant Director for Medical Education and Access Services at the Indiana University School of Medicine's Ruth Lilly Medical Library, where she develops EBM content and trains faculty on instruction best practices. Her main professional interests are curriculum development and delivery. A Medical Library Association Research Training Institute fellow, Laura has published and presented extensively on EBM teaching. A citation to the article associated with this presentation is below.

Menard L, Blevins AE, Trujillo DJ, Lazarus KH. Integrating evidence-based medicine skills into a medical school curriculum: a quantitative outcomes assessment. BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine. 2021 Oct 1;26(5):249-50.

Menard-Integrating evidence-based medicine skills into a medical school curriculum-177_a.mp4

Menard-Integrating evidence-based medicine skills into a medical school curriculum-177_b.pptx

Menard-Integrating evidence-based medicine skills into a medical school curriculum-177_c.pdf


ID: 1226 / O 1.2: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Online-only postgraduate taught programmes at the University of Edinburgh – unexpected benefits to online only students of the development of online services and resources to support campus based students during Covid

Fiona Brown, Marshall Dozier

University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Introduction

The University of Edinburgh has provided online only postgraduate taught programmes since 2004, and the Library has supported these programmes and students, developing services and resources to do so. Over this time, the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine (CMVM) had a strategic aim to increase the number of postgraduate programmes delivered online only. In the 2020-2021 academic year 95% of CMVM’s 3000 postgraduate taught students were on online only programmes.
In March 2020, in common with universities and colleges worldwide, the University of Edinburgh responded to the Covid outbreak by looking at ways to move campus-based learning, teaching and support online. CMVM used the experience of delivering online-only programmes to feed into this. From a library services perspective, there were also knock-on benefits for students on online only programmes as further online resources and services moved online.

Aim

We will report on our activities in supporting the transition to online and the unexpected impacts on our online only students.
Program Description

In the Library, we used our experience of supporting online only programmes to help develop our support for the campus based students who were transitioning to online. We provide online resources, online teaching and online trouble shooting. Following the start of the pandemic, we made better use of some of the technology which we already had, delivering more of our services online.
We will be forecasting the impact should services return to pre-pandemic availability options.

Evaluation

We are in the process of gathering input from our library colleagues in our collections services teams and our academic support teams. We are evaluating whether, and how, we will adjust our teaching and support practices even if we have a return to campus.
We are also gathering input from academic colleagues, course teams and students on online-only programmes on how (if at all) our resource and service developments have impacted on the learning and teaching experience.

Conclusion

We are still gathering information on the impacts of these changes and developments. Indicative areas we are looking at include the changes to delivery, and recording of, our one-to-one and generic information skills provision; how the increase in our recorded information skills provision has impacted on how we deliver our teaching and support; and the growth of our etextbook provision and whether this is sustainable.

Human Touch (Recommended)

The authors would be interested in hearing if colleagues in other libraries have had similar experiences.
We feel this links with current dialogues in the UK networks on ebook costs.

Biography and Bibliography
Fiona Brown is Academic Support Librarian for Veterinary Medicine, Roslin Institute and Biological Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. She provides specialist support to staff and students, both campus based and online, in all matters relating to library services. Her role includes the design, delivery and evaluation of information skills training for staff and students. She liaises with colleagues to support the Library in delivering the University's strategies for learning, teaching and research. She is a co-author of EBVM Learning (ebvmlearning.org).

Marshall Dozier leads a team of Academic Support Librarians working to
support the Library in delivering the University's strategies for
learning, teaching and research within the College of Medicine and
Veterinary Medicine. Marshall offers specialist library support to
Deaneries within the Edinburgh Medical School and NHS in Lothian.

Brown-Online-only postgraduate taught programmes at the University-1226_a.pptx
   


ID: 1142 / O 1.2: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Assessing EBM Behaviors of Medical Students via an OSCE: The Librarian Perspective

Joey Nicholson1, Adina Kalet2, Anique de Bruin3, Cees van der Vleuten3

1NYU Health Sciences Library, NYU Langone Health, USA; 2Kern Institute, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA; 3Maastricht University, School of Health Professions Eduction, Netherlands

Introduction
The ability for medical students to form clinical questions and retrieve evidence to advance patient care is an integral set of skills necessary both to provide the best care, and also to meet lifelong learning goals. While it is common for librarians to teach these skills, it is much less common for librarians to contribute actively to robust formative assessment of them as part of their education practice.

When librarians assess these evidence-based medicine (EBM) skills in medical students, the assessments tend to run parallel to standard curricular assessments and are based solely on multiple choice or essay-style written exams. However, this does not allow an opportunity for formative feedback to be given on actual performed behaviors integrated with other key clinical activities.

Observed structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are a common method of assessing and providing feedback on how medical students actually perform behaviors that they are expected to practice. Ideally, assessment of EBM should be integrated into existing assessment systems and structures, like the OSCE, in order to be better aligned with medical student and faculty expectations. This type of assessment is necessary to reinforce learning and provide actionable feedback.

An EBM OSCE station was recently developed and implemented as part of an immersive OSCE assessing multiple clinical skills. This EBM OSCE is currently being used at a cohort of 6 medical schools.

However, librarians involved have not been familiar with or prepared to assess EBM behaviors via observation. The purpose of this study is to determine how feasible and useful it is for librarians to assess medical student EBM behaviors via a video-observed OSCE.
Aim
To understand and document the experiences and preferences of health sciences librarians regarding assessing EBM behaviors in medical students in order to inform EBM assessment tool development and validation and offer potential solutions to barriers in implementation.
Method/ Program Description
This study will employ a focus group design using an opportunistic sample of health sciences librarians who have already participated in this video-observed EBM OSCE. Focus groups will be followed up as necessary with individual semi-structured interviews.
Results/ Evaluation
Focus group transcripts will be analyzed and coded using a Constructivist Grounded Theory approach. Data will be primarily analyzed by the principal investigator beginning with a round of initial coding to surface main themes, and a second round of focused coding. Focus groups are planned for early 2022.

Conclusion

It is expected that librarians will find assessing EBM behaviors of medical students via a video-based OSCE useful in providing formative feedback to students and helping to reinforce key concepts in EBM. Additionally, by observing and understanding student behaviors, librarians can create a feedback loop to improve and better tailor their instruction. However, it is also expected that librarians may face many common barriers to feasibility, including: the time commitment, curricular support, and administrative support.

Human Touch

This research aims to help librarians connect better with both students and faculty and to further understanding of the role of the librarian in teaching and assessment of EBM.

Biography and Bibliography
Mr. Joey Nicholson is the Chair and Director of the NYU Health Sciences Library at NYU Langone Health. Over the past 10 years, he has been responsible for integrating evidence-based medicine teaching and assessment within the curriculum for students in the Grossman School of Medicine. As a part of this work, he worked with a team of clinicians and faculty to develop better ways of assessing and providing feedback to medical students on these important skills. This research is also a part of his dissertation work, focused on assessing EBM behaviors via observation. Below is a short list of recent publications relevant to and fundamental in developing and guiding this abstract proposal.

1. Kalet A, Zabar S, Szyld D, et al. A simulated "Night-onCall" to assess and address the readiness-for-internship of transitioning medical students. Adv Simul (Lond). 2017;2:13. Published 2017 Aug 14. doi:10.1186/s41077-017-0046-1

2. Nicholson J, Spak JM, Kovar-Gough I, Lorbeer ER, Adams NE. Entrustable professional activity 7: opportunities to collaborate on evidence-based medicine teaching and assessment of medical students. BMC Med Educ. 2019;19(1):330. Published 2019 Sep 3. doi:10.1186/s12909-019-1764-y

3. Nicholson J, Kalet A, van der Vleuten C, de Bruin A. Understanding medical student evidence-based medicine information seeking in an authentic clinical simulation. J Med Libr Assoc. 2020;108(2):219-228. doi:10.5195/jmla.2020.875

Nicholson-Assessing EBM Behaviors of Medical Students via an OSCE-1142_a.pptx
   


ID: 1164 / O 1.2: 7
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

The Library’s Project Thesis Clinic

Marte Ødegaard, Ivana Malovic, Skjalg Tønnesen Kalvik, Sara Clarke

Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway

Introduction
What do we do when library teaching does not fit into the academic schedule? In response to this challenge, we started a project to provide information literacy teaching “just in time”.

A common challenge faced by academic libraries is reduced time granted to course- integrated teaching of information literacy. This raises the concern that students will not obtain the necessary information literacy skills required for their studies. In this presentation we describe how we met these challenges through the creation of freestanding courses covering central aspects of information literacy, tailored to medical students. The catalyst for this course was the project thesis (20 ECTS) that the students complete as part of their professional education.

The project thesis requires that students complete an independent scientific work wherein they specialize in a chosen field or innovation project. The project thesis is completed over a two-year period where January in year one contains courses in evidence-based medicine (EBM) and how to do a research project, and year two includes two teaching-free periods dedicated to project thesis work. The long time lag between the course in EBM and the individual study-period makes it difficult for the students to apply what they have learned. This leads to periodically increased pressure on the library due to the large number of students requesting instruction during their periods of self-directed learning.

Aim
The aim of this project was to find a solution to the added pressure on library services during the project thesis period by creating a suite of freestanding courses tailored specifically to the needs of the students. We had the following questions in the development of the project:

  • At which time will the students find the courses most useful?
  • How do we ensure that students get timely information when the project thesis stretches over a two-year period, and when faculty leaves little room for practical training in information skills?
  • How do we ensure the teaching we provide is relevant and covers the necessary topics?

Program Description
We created a collection of freestanding courses named the Project thesis clinic. The Project Thesis Clinic (PTC) lasts for a month and includes courses on academic writing, literature searching, critical appraisal, citing scientific literature, and individual guidance.

Evaluation
High attendance and positive feedback from the first clinic in 2021 showed the PTC was successful, which prompted the library to plan it again for January 2022. We adjusted the program based on feedback from the students in 2021 and aim to collect feedback in January 2022 using evaluation forms after the clinic has taken place.

Conclusion

This project has allowed us to test new teaching approaches, as well as ensuring that students receive required information literacy training “just-in-time” for when it is required. The global pandemic and need for digital solutions have also affected how the project has been developed.

Human Touch

Medical students feel the library provides them with the tools needed for success in their project.

Biography and Bibliography
Marte Ødegaard holds a Master of Science in Evidence Based Practice in Health Care and works at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway. Her work interests are information literacy, systematic searches, and the librarians role in research.

Ivana Malovic holds a Ph.d. in Medical Biology and works at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway. Her work interests are critical appraisal, open science and research data management.

Skjalg Tønnessen Kalvik holds a Bachelor of Library and Information Sciences and works at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway.

Sara Clarke holds a Master in Information Services Management and is Head of Section for Literature Searching and EBM at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway.

Ødegaard-The Library’s Project Thesis Clinic-1164_a.pdf
   


ID: 1232 / O 1.2: 8
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Building searching skills early in the veterinary school curriculum to support evidence based practice

Heather K Moberly, Virginia R Fajt

Texas A&M University, United States of America

Introduction

Evidence based practice is based on a series of steps that include identification, critical appraisal, and application of information. Learning to create answerable questions to describe a clinical scenario and to construct literature searches are foundation steps for the appraisal and application. Librarians are well suited to teach and assess these first steps and to collaborate with veterinary faculty to create a complete and contextualized evidence based medicine, or evidence based veterinary medicine education experience for students.

Aim

A veterinary faculty member teaching evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) in a pharmacology course included librarian a led instruction session for a number of years. During a curriculum reorganization, EBVM was added to the first year curriculum as a component of the Critical Thinking module in the Professional and Clinical Skills (PCS) course. The aim of this move was to introduce EBVM earlier in the curriculum and provide additional opportunities for these skills to be scaffolded and reinforced throughout the four year curriculum.

Method/ Program Description

This presentation describes the collaborative EBVM sessions and assignments during the first two years of veterinary school during the PCS course in year one and the pharmacology course in year two. These classes were recently redesigned to provide the students with a contiguous three semester foundation of the Ask, Acquire, and Appraise steps of EBVM. During this sequence of sessions both the subject and library faculty provide lectures, hands-on laboratories, anonymous and non-anonymous in class "polling" interactions, and feedback for both ungraded and graded assignments.

Results/ Evaluation

The current series of EBVM sessions and assignments during the first two years of a veterinary curriculum expand upon their predecessors. The additional sessions and assignments are placed in a more contextualized environment to increase perceived relevance by the students.

Conclusion

Expanding time in the critical thinking module of the veterinary curriculum (spring semester, year one), increasing the number of graded assignments and the associated point values of the assignments, and strengthening instruction support for searching skills is expected to improve searching skills and increase retention of the skills for use the following semester (Fall semester, year two). Improving these first and second year skills is expected to improve comfort and adoption of the EBVM method in the later clinical years of the curriculum and in postgraduate practice.

Biography and Bibliography
Heather K. Moberly currently serves as the Coordinator of Veterinary Information and Research Services and holds the Dorothy G. Whitley Professorship in Library Science. Dr. Virginia R. Fajt is a clinical professor and clinical veterinary pharmacologist who teaches throughout the veterinary curriculum and currently serves as Chair of the Curriculum Committee. In 2013 they began collaborating with the explicit intention to improve and increase the inclusion of the evidence-based veterinary medicine methodology across the veterinary curriculum. Both recently completed terms in offices in the Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine Association; Fajt as Director followed by President, Moberly as Executive Secretary followed by Director. Moberly is a co-author of the "Acquire" module of the EBVM Learning online, open access tutorial. (https://EBVMLearning.org)

Moberly-Building searching skills early in the veterinary school curriculum-1232_a.pptx
   
 
3:00pm - 3:30pmO 1.3: Online Discussion Professionals Connected
Session Chair: Wichor Bramer

The abstracts will not be presented live during this session. You can are advised to view the recorded presentations before this session. Presenters will briefly introduce themselves and then discuss their research, and answers questions.

 
ID: 121 / O 1.3: 1
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Human touch in animal health: how to benefit the resources of scientific literature with professionals connected

Raisa Iivonen1, Rosa Venäläinen2, Gunilla Widén1

1Åbo Akademi University; 2University of Helsinki

Introduction

Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) is defined as “the use of best relevant evidence in conjunction with clinical expertise to make best possible decision about a veterinary patient. The circumstances of each patient, and the circumstances and values of the owner/ carer, must also be considered when making an evidence-based decision”. Successful decision making based on high quality evidence is required in contemporary clinical practice. The workload may be heavy, the customers are demanding but the clinician has to obey the law. Sometimes the situations demand immediate decision making – based on evidence – to avoid worse consequences.

The findability of the reliable information is crucial; therefore, it is important to support the information seeking process by refining the search tools.

Aim

Better findability needs better search tools – e.g., deep indexing, high quality-controlled vocabulary and usable interfaces. Comparing the index terms in two abstracting services aims to reveal the differences between indexers, the vocabularies they use and the depth of the understanding of the subject. Since there is no veterinary specialist involved, indexers have to rely on the vocabularies available.

Method

Testing the working of scientific terminology in everyday practice of veterinarians in our country is done by comparing the index terms used in 17 peer-revied articles in our national professional journal. These articles were published between 2016-2019 and are chosen from 50 articles to represent the majority of topics a small animal practitioner experiences during the daily practice. They were indexed in two databases, one national and the other international.

Results

The expected results show differences in the viewpoints of the database producers as well the resources the indexing services have. E.g., the size of the vocabularies – thesaurus, ontology – has differences due to the history of service producers. Another study object is to compare the time differences between publishing and indexing. As the peer reviewing process of an article may take some months, it is important to provide the access to it as soon as possible.

Conclusion

Solutions to the findability problems require well established co-operation among professionals as well tools and infrastructures available to the end-users.

From the ontologising point of view, the content description with exact terms in very special areas is crucial. Deep understanding of the discipline indexed, as well as solid semantical basis of the vocabulary served, guarantee a reliable search procedure.

A collaboration project is needed to connect the professionals in the fields of veterinary sciences and practices, terminologists, indexers, and end-users.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Human touch in animal health: how to benefit the resources of scientific literature with professionals connected

Biography and Bibliography
Raisa Iivonen is a Ph.D. student in the Åbo Akademy University. She is interested in semantic web and ontologies from the veterinary point of view.

Iivonen, R., Venäläinen, R. & Widén, G. Findability of Evidence - The Cornerstone of Successful Practice. Case Finnish Veterinary Medical Terminology Ontologized. In: EAHIL 2021 Virtual Workshop Proceedings Abstract Book, 5th - 8th of July 2021, İstanbul / edited by Güssün Güneş. İstanbul : Marmara University, 2021. (Marmara University Publications) p. 107-108.

Iivonen-Human touch in animal health-121_a.pdf

Iivonen-Human touch in animal health-121_b.pdf

Iivonen-Human touch in animal health-121_c.pdf


ID: 1155 / O 1.3: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Collaboration between the librarian and researchers

Eli Harriss1, Sabine Klein2

1University of Oxford, United Kingdom; 2University of Zurich, Switzerland

Introduction

We want to discuss the holistic, ‘total’ nature of what can happen when a librarian works with researchers to collaborate on a project such a systematic review. We use the ‘total’ model to consider the breadth of skills required by library staff: project management; people management; time management; communication; teaching; and information literacy. We describe the practical steps that we can take when conducting the reference interview and an algorithm that we can use, the mentoring aspect involved in these relationships, and the “invisible work” (with reference to Ross-White, 2021) and emotional labour put in by library staff (with reference to Constantin, 1840 and Emmelhainz et al, 2017) to ensure that projects are successful, methodologies are rigorous, robust, and transparent, and that all communication is positive to maintain future collaboration.
Aim

Two case studies are presented to compare the practical steps we take when a librarian approaches a research group, or when researchers approach the librarian to request their involvement in a project such as a systematic, scoping, or realist review; the pastoral care and mentoring aspects involved in managing the information science aspects of a review project; the emotional labour and the behavioural aspects of meetings with students and researchers for 1-1s to discuss research projects.
Method/ Program Description

Case studies from Medical Librarians based at the University of Oxford and the University of Zurich are used as the research method for this presentation.
Results/ Evaluation

We present an algorithm of steps to follow in the reference interview, and describe the mentoring skills and the emotional labour involved in two cases.

Conclusion

These case studies reveal that, in line with the literature, the practical steps involved in the reference interview, the mentoring and pastoral care of students and researchers, and the emotional labour are not unique to the work of Medical Librarians, setting our work in the broader context of librarianship, and raising awareness of these issues both for further training and for professional welfare. We also encourage our fellow librarians to discuss more about how to deal with demanding researchers and how to set boundaries in a professional way.

References

Constantin, L. A. Bibliothekonomie : oder Lehre von der Anordnung, Bewahrung und Verwaltung der Bibliotheken. Leipzig: N.p., 1840.

Emmelhainz, C., Pappas, E. & Seale, M. 2017. Behavioral expectations for the mommy librarian: the successful reference transaction as emotional labor, Sacramento, CA, Library Juice Press.

Ross-White, A. 2021. Search is a verb: systematic review searching as invisible labor. J Med Libr Assoc, 109, 505-506.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This paper is very much focussing on the human touch involved when Librarians collaborate with Researchers, discussing the emotional labour and the interpersonal skills required for this work.

Biography and Bibliography
Eli Harriss has worked as an Outreach Librarian and Library Manager for thirteen years and is now the Outreach and Enquiry Services Manager for the Bodleian Health Care Libraries at the University of Oxford (UK).

Sabine Klein is a former medical subject librarian and newly appointed product manager at the Zurich University Library. She strives to improve products and customer services.

Harriss-Collaboration between the librarian and researchers-1155_a.pptx
   


ID: 149 / O 1.3: 3
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Reflections on a successful collaboration between information specialists in a low contextual setting: an exploration of the roles of information specialists in systematic review

Jenni Washington1, Lydia Jones2

1Health Technology Wales, United Kingdom; 2Department of Medical Consultancy, Federal Joint Committee (G-BA), Germany

Introduction

Information specialists and review teams seem to have an unspoken understanding of the literature search process. In this presentation, two information specialists working in Health Technology Assessment reflect on their roles as information specialists in a successful project-based international collaboration on a systematic review. The low contextual setting in which the collaboration between two information specialists with heterogenous daily practice and no previous contact presents an opportunity to examine this understanding of the literature search process brought by each of the information specialists. How and why are they similar? How and why are they different? How can we make shared understanding more explicit or resolve discrepancies?

Aim

To gain a deeper understanding of how models of the literature search process might affect collaborations in a low contextual setting and to offer insights gleaned from experience.

Method

We undertook an observational exploratory case study by examining our correspondence, meeting notes and annotated drafts of project deliverables, as well as using our personal recollections. We analysed the data descriptively using models of the literature search process described in previous research as a framework.

Results

We describe the points at which our implicit understanding strongly agreed or deviated and the effects these had on our collaboration, as well as the larger project. We share potential strategies for making literature searching models more explicit, leveraging agreement to benefit the collaboration and the project, as well as to resolve discrepancies. Furthermore, we explore possible connections between project outcomes and the degree to which our implicit literature searching models, and those of the larger review team, were in agreement.

Conclusion

When conducting a collaborative project in a low contextual setting, it is important to think about the following:

  • Make literature searching models explicit – we did this by privately talking through the “what” and “who” of the whole project, then proposing the resulting process to the larger review group. We relied on our experience and consulted relevant guidelines, but using relevant guidelines as a starting point could also be a useful approach.
  • Communication – what will be the primary method of communication? We recommend email, as it serves as a record of the communication. Save telephone / video conversations for things which require discussion, but minute what is decided.
  • Technology – You need to get creative when faced with issues, especially technological challenges. Ensure that you establish which technology is essential to the progression of the project and make sure that everyone has the required software/version of software.

We recommend that information specialists in a similar situation take time for side-discussions to ensure successful collaboration.

Human Touch

The collaboration and relationship that was built between two information specialists from different countries was a happy by-product of the project. We are now in a position where we could contact the other person for advice on any information specialist topic and their opinion would be fully respected. In fact, working on this project has led to a number of other pieces of work where we have collaborated.

Biography and Bibliography
Jenni Washington has over 20 years’ experience as an Information Scientist. She currently works as an Information Specialist for Health Technology Wales and previously as an Information Officer for SIGN (Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network).

Lydia Jones currently works as an Information Specialist supporting evidence-based decision making at the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA). She previously did similar work in the fields of Scholarly Edition and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).

Washington-Reflections on a successful collaboration between information specialists-149_a.mp4

Washington-Reflections on a successful collaboration between information specialists-149_b.pdf
 


ID: 224 / O 1.3: 4
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Lifting the lamp from under the bushel: Showcasing the work of midwifery students

Sinéad Keogh, Liz Dore

University of Limerick, Ireland

Introduction
As part of the midwifery training run by the Midwifery Practice Development Unit (MPDU) in University of Limerick, students must spend time on placement in both maternity settings and specialist areas such as surgical and mental health settings. Following this residency, the students are asked to create a reflective piece about their experience. These ‘learning logs’ were collected from students through the years and revealed truly beautiful and thoughtful insights into the midwifery students themselves, and the patients they encountered. Wanting to expose these works to a wider audience, but not having the skills needed, the MPDU staff approached the library to ask for help in creating an online exhibition. Having some experience in this area already, the library was happy to support our colleagues with this innovative project.

Aim
To create an online exhibition of the midwifery students' reflective practice pieces.

Method
The staff of the MPDU who oversaw the student placements, selected, digitised and collated the learning logs for inclusion in an exhibition. They also gained permission from the students to use their work. The library staff worked with the MPDU to create an online exhibition using Wordpress, with regular meetings to offer advice and resolve issues, to ensure the overall vision was achieved. Some material was re-scanned and enhanced for display.

Results
The reflective pieces are presented in an attractive online exhibition format (https://ul.ie/midsight), allowing the MPDU staff to promote the midwifery degree course and the individual students can share their own learning logs. However, the logs are also reusable learning objects, and primary sources for further research on midwifery teaching. Already the learning logs have been used informally to identify areas for improvement and to pinpoint challenges in preparation for student placements. A doctoral student working on this project has found that the students find the logs help them both with their reflection and in providing female centred care.

Conclusion
We had previously curated online exhibitions showcasing material from our special and archival collections. Our experience allowed us to offer a new library service to our community and aid them in making an important collection, demonstrating the importance of reflection guided learning, available to a wider audience. We were also able to put in place some workflows and practices that our midwifery colleagues could use to ensure the continuation of the project. We have since worked with colleagues in the History Department on enhancing online engagement with teaching.

Human Touch (Recommended)
The MPDU had wanted to do something with the learning logs for a long time but did not know what or how. We in the library used our digital skills to bridge that knowledge gap to support and educate our colleagues so that they could achieve their goal, and maintain it into the future. As the content is quite poignant and deals with universal topics affecting us all, exploring the material together gave us a chance to reflect on the topics, and to bond over shared life experiences despite our different roles and training.

Biography and Bibliography
Sinéad Keogh is the Digital Services Librarian at the University of Limerick where she manages the Institutional Repository, the Digital Library and the digitisation unit.

Liz Dore is the Librarian supporting the teaching and research of the Faculty of Education & Health Sciences in the University of Limerick with particular interest in systematic reviews.

Keogh-Lifting the lamp from under the bushel-224_a.mp4
   


ID: 191 / O 1.3: 5
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Experience of a librarian involved in a European project for guidelines during the pandemic.

Valeria Scotti1, Gaia Mori2, Cannata Livia3, Prati Federica4, Support-e Consortium5

1Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo of Pavia, Italy; 2European Blood Alliance, EBA, Brussels, Belgium; 3Centro Nazionale Sangue and Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy.; 4Immunohematology and Transfusion Service, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy.; 5Support-e Consortium

Introduction

SUPPORT-E is a research project supported by the European Commission, which brings together the major European Blood Establishments. Its aim is to support high quality clinical trials and their scientific evaluation of Covid-19 Convalescent Plasma (CCP). The main goal of the project is to help EU countries in both assessing the efficacy of a new therapeutic solution to deal with the current Coronavirus crisis and developing new strategies to face potential future pandemics. The project is divided into 7 work packages. My hospital is the leader of the first one (WP1).
Aim

The main objective of WP1 was to assess the current state of the art relating to the collection, characterization, and efficacy of CCP in the treatment of patients with COVID-19 through an analysis of published and ongoing studies. The other objectives included producing preliminary clinical trial guidelines and evaluation criteria, producing preliminary guidelines for monitored access, and ongoing monitoring trials and publications.

Method

An electronic literature search was performed on PubMed, Embase, Cinhal, WHO COVID-19 Global Research Database, CDC COVID-19 Research Article database, ClinicalTrials.gov, Cochrane Covid-19 study Register, WHO ICTRP, Transfusion Evidence Library, and pre-prints databases. A combination of text words was used to maximize the specificity and sensitivity of the search. Refworks3 was used as a reference manager to collect and import all records retrieved from the literature search and eliminate duplicates. Rayyan4 was used to speed up the screening process. Once the results were exported from Refworks to Rayyan, two sections were created: one for articles only and one for trials. The selection of studies was carried out independently by two WP1 reviewers (including the librarian). The eligibility assessment was based on the title or abstract and the full text, if necessary. The whole team decided on the final inclusion or exclusion of the studies.

Results

Three bibliographic searches were launched at different times (from December 2019 through June 2021) for both articles and trials. A total of 9328 articles and 4751 trials were evaluated. Of these, 243 articles and 212 trials were included in the project. In order to collect and enter the data contained in the articles and trials, a special database was built using REdCap. The data from the clinical trials were passed to Wp2 in charge of the selection of the ones feasible for the grant.

Conclusion

In this context, the formulation of recommendations based on scientific and clinical insights from newly developed standardized assays and the evaluation of donor and recipient PCC data have been of paramount importance. Three important guidelines were developed, shared, and discussed with all research teams. Working on such a sensitive and important topic during the pandemic was a personal and professional challenge. Especially in the beginning, when bibliographic research involved structuring complex strings to retrieve every possible article. A further relaunch of the bibliographic research will be carried out in January 2021 for the constant monitoring of publications.

Human Touch

Connecting with doctors, field researchers, and colleagues across Europe has enriched my knowledge and skills.

Biography and Bibliography
I have a degree in Political Science. Since 2009 I have been working as a biomedical librarian at the Scientific Documentation Center of the Research and Health Institute Fondazione San Matteo Policlinico of Pavia. In all these years I have organized conferences, orchestrated courses, held lectures on bibliometric indicators and on the main bibliographic databases. I have participated, as biomedical librarian, to the drafting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. I was re-elected Italian Representative of the EAHIL Council 2019-2022, second term, and I am also the co-founder of the Sig Evaluation And Metrics Group of Eahil.

Scotti-Experience of a librarian involved in a European project-191_a.pptx
   
 
3:30pm - 4:00pmO 1.4: Online Discussion Data
Session Chair: Winnie Schats

The abstracts will not be presented live during this session. You can are advised to view the recorded presentations before this session. Presenters will briefly introduce themselves and then discuss their research, and answers questions.

 
ID: 211 / O 1.4: 1
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Data

ANALYSIS OF A DECADE OF RESEARCH GAP IN DATA MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN ACADEMIC LIBRARIES: A SOCIAL SCIENCE PERSPECTIVES

Dorcas Irewole Ibinaiye1, Glenrose Velile Jiyane2, Jennifer Wemimo Ibinaiye3, Rukayat A. Tijani4

1University of Zululand, South Africa; 2University of Zululand, South Africa; 3Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria; 4Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

Introduction

The changing needs of academic library users require services such as research data management, data sharing, data stewardship, linked data technology, big data, knowledge of data management and policies to be included in the library and information science curriculum, and professional training for effective service delivery in academic libraries in the developing countries specifically in Africa. Academic libraries in Africa recognise the importance of research data management practices to ensure that organised data is shared, accessible, usable, safe, and trusted for effective service delivery. The idea of RDM practices met researchers’ complex changing information needs and became more personalised and detailed. Despite the value and benefits of RDM services for researchers and patrons, RDM services were poorly implemented and underutilised among African scholars.

Aim

This study aimed to identify the research gap in studies investigating the research data management practices in academic libraries in Africa from the social science perspective to inform the best method of meeting clients’ information needs in the 21st century. The study sought to answer the questions such as: What is the role of data librarians as data management service providers in addressing the changing information needs of users of academic libraries? What are the current practices and training requirements to ensure efficient research data management provision in academic libraries within the last decade? What strategies were used to provide efficient research data management practices to inform the changing needs of users of academic libraries in the previous decade?

Method/ Program Description

Library and Information Science Source and Scopus databases were searched for articles focusing on research data management practices and services provision and addressing the changing information needs of users of academic libraries in Africa. Limits were set to include articles published in English between 2013 and 2022 in the literature analysis.

Results/ Evaluation

Most articles focusing on research data management practices and services in academic libraries in Africa from social science perspectives were published between 2017 and 2021. However, little literature addresses the changing needs of scholars using academic libraries.

Conclusion

Understanding the complexities involved in the use of data and the role of data librarians is crucial to effective data management services provided for users of academic and research libraries. Current practices involve acquiring data management skills, given that it is essential in helping data librarians address the changing needs of library clients. Strategies for best practices in research data management practices in academic libraries in Africa include awareness of the benefits of RDM, data literacy and skill acquisition, adoption of digital technologies, and practical communication skills to stay relevant in this increasingly digital world.

Human Touch (Recommended)

The literature search was limited to articles published between 2013 and 2022. Despite challenges faced by LIS professionals, research data management practices remain crucial to improving African academic and research libraries. Recommendations made include: increasing funding for library managers, adopting working policies, making information available for researchers, providing training for LIS professionals, grant opportunities for LIS researchers as well as improving services provision.

Biography and Bibliography
Ibinaiye Dircas Irewole is a doctoral student in the Department of Library and Information Studies, University of Zululand, South Africa.

Ibinaiye, Irewole Dorcas I. D.; SAMBO, Suleiman Dr.; YUSUF,, Ahmed; and ABDULFATAH, Abdulrahim, "A Scoping Review of Research Ethics and Practices in Library and Information Science in Scopus and Library and Information Science Source Databases" (2021). Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal). 6599.

Ibinaiye, Irewole Dorcas., "Applying Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking to Hepatitis B and C Patients’ Information Seeking in the South African Context: A Scoping Review" (2021). Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal). 4934. https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/4934

Ibinaiye, I. D., & Jiyane, G. V. (2021). Hepatitis B and C Patients' Information Seeking at a Selected Tertiary Health Institution in South Africa. Mousaion, 39(2).

Ibinaiye-ANALYSIS OF A DECADE OF RESEARCH GAP IN DATA MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN ACADEMIC LIBRARIES-211_a.pptx

Ibinaiye-ANALYSIS OF A DECADE OF RESEARCH GAP IN DATA MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN ACADEMIC LIBRARIES-211_b.docx

Ibinaiye-ANALYSIS OF A DECADE OF RESEARCH GAP IN DATA MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN ACADEMIC LIBRARIES-211_c.pptx


ID: 1117 / O 1.4: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Data

Archiving and publishing research data at University Medical Centre Utrecht

Nico Poppelier

University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands, Netherlands, The

Introduction

In 2019 University Medical Centre Utrecht embarked on a project aimed at implementing a platform for archiving and disclosing the results of scientific research. Two fundamental concepts underlying this project are Open Science and FAIR. In this presentation we will describe the results of the project.

Aim

The goal of the project was to implement a platform that would enable researchers to archive the results of their research projects and to disclose these results to colleagues within and outside the institute. Fundamental concepts here are Open Science and FAIR. Sharing data is an important step that a research institute should take to give substance to the concept of Open Science, a component of the research strategy of University Medical Centre Utrecht . In order to optimally share data, it is crucial to make this data findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR). For this, we need new IT platforms, but also clear policies and guidelines.

Method/ Program Description

Using a list of criteria developed by a working group of the Research Data Alliance, we evaluated several software packages, including Archivematica, Dataverse, DSpace, CKAN and YODA (a development of University Medical Centre Utrecht). Some of the important criteria were: GDPR compliance, metadata support, check-sums, and conversion to durable file formats.

We concluded that none of the specified software packages matched our requirements for both archiving and disclosing research data. However, a combination of two software packages, Archivematica and Dataverse, turned out to be the best solution for our institute. Therefore we decided to divide the project in three parts:

  1. implement an internal archive based on Archivematica
  2. implement DataverseNL as our preferred repository for sharing data
  3. develop an integration between Archivematica and Dataverse

Results/ Evaluation

In July 2021 we started using DataverseNL with our own guidelines and process description.

In December 2021 we will start using the Archivematica archive. The integration will be realized in the first quarter of 2022.

Conclusion

Developing and implementing the processes around these IT platforms proved to be very time-consuming. We also invested a lot of time in communication with researchers, writing documentation and developing training material. Data managers play an important role, since they provide support to the researchers. The principal investigators also play an important role, both in the process of publishing a dataset on DataverseNL, and in the process of assessing a request for access to a published dataset.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Introducing new IT platforms is only a small part of this project, since we require researchers to organize their work differently: structure your research folder, document all steps in your preparation and analysis, collect metadata for all data files, and document the conditions under which data can be shared. Open Science and FAIR are valuable concepts, but they do not come for free: researchers are required to spend extra time on meeting these requirements, supported by data managers. Most researchers are willing to do this, provided they are acknowledged and rewarded in some way.

Biography and Bibliography
1978-1984 MSc theoretical physics, University of Utrecht.
1984-1989 PhD theoretical nuclear physics, University of Utrecht.
1990-2000 Elsevier Science
Since 2002 I work at the University Medical Centre Utrecht, initially in the field of healthcare IT, but since early 2019 in the field of research IT.
My list of publications can be found through my ORCID identifier 0000-0002-1246-4342.

Poppelier-Archiving and publishing research data at University Medical Centre Utrecht-1117_a.pptx
   


ID: 1147 / O 1.4: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Data

Implementing new tool during the pandemic distance work - case REDCap

Katri Larmo, Tiina Heino, Iina Hepolehto

Helsinki University Library, Terkko Medical Campus Library, Finland

Introduction: REDCap is a tool for capturing research data, also sensitive and personal data. It was created in 2004 at Vanderbilt University (USA) and is now widely used all over the world. University of Helsinki got REDCap license in 2020 and the tool was launched for customer use in 2021.

Aim: We describe the process of learning REDCap and starting the user education, all this during the pandemic distance work. How to communicate effectively, learn both together and independently, keep up the good spirit and sense of community and work intensively, with still enough time to breath and rest? The focus is on the individual information specialist point of view.

Program Description:

The initial REDCap admin team included 5 persons; 3 from the library and 2 from the IT-center. The system is owned by the library. REDCap was licensed in 2020 and launched to customers in 2021. The user support started with information campaign, webinar sessions and establishing REDCap-support-email. The first webinars were given from the survey data point of view, with good feedback.

However, we soon discovered the need for webinars specializing to the clinical research data point of view. It was decided that Terkko information specialist gives these webinars, with the support of research data team members. This started intensive learning – both for the REDCap tool and for deeper understanding of the clinical research process. In October 2021 the first two webinars of “REDCap – clinical data” were given and since that we have collectively supported the customers with their REDCap projects. One of the Terkko information specialists is now on the admin team of REDCap.

Evaluation:

From the individual information specialist point of view, the key things to make this happen were 1) Great support from colleagues and learning together 2) Strong motivation: we were very happy to get REDCap available for our customers. 3) Deadlines: “test webinar” given to colleagues, right after the summer holidays, gave good structure for working 4) Very generous sharing of information also form other organizations; e.g. an experienced REDCap-user and biostatistician from the University of Turku giving us a “private” webinar session 5) Active utilization of excellent REDCap webinars from YouTube – thanks to the distance work there were lot of good webinars available 6) Change to make stupid questions 7) Aiming to “growth mindset” (see Dr. Carol Dweck) 8) Customers’ questions and real life cases 9) Problem solving together with good colleagues and customers.

Conclusion:

When implementing new services, especially in exceptional times such as the covid pandemic and total distance working, it is crucial to have the good and continuous communication with colleagues, a strong sense of community and motivation.

Human Touch:

With this presentation we would like to invite EAHIL colleagues to this discussion – both about the practicalities of REDCap and creating a good supportive atmosphere that carries us through to the “new normal”.

Biography and Bibliography
Dweck CS. Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. Updated Edition. New York: Ballantine Books; 2007. 320 s.

Larmo-Implementing new tool during the pandemic distance work-1147_a.pptx

Larmo-Implementing new tool during the pandemic distance work-1147_b.mp4
 


ID: 104 / O 1.4: 4
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Data

Evaluating the Data Literacy of Academic Librarians in Iran

Maryam Moghadami1, Mila Malekolkalami2, Hassan Mantegh3

1Tehran University, Iran, Islamic Republic of; 2Tarbiat moders university,iran, Islamic Republic of; 3Tarbiat moders university,iran, Islamic Republic of

Introduction
Today, data literacy is essential for people. Data literacy is even more critical for librarians as information science professionals who are exposed to a wealth of information and data daily. Data literacy is a new concept in the field of librarianship. Understanding how to work with large datasets, how to generate them, how to connect different datasets, and how to interpret them is valuable
Aim
This article studies and compares the situation of data literacy of students and graduates in the field of knowledge and information science who are working as librarians or specialists in libraries and information departments in Iran
Method/ Program Description
We review graduates' and students’ data literacy through a questionnaire consisting of 4 sections and 24 questions designed by Oguguo et al. (2020). This study shows that despite the importance of data literacy skills such as data collection, hypothesis statements, data visualization, and interpretation, Ph.D. students, and Masters and Ph.D. graduates do not seem to have sufficient data analysis skills
Results/ Evaluation
Findings show that librarians are highly skilled in the components of data collection, hypotheses and problem statements, data visualization, and interpretation. However, they are at a moderate level in data analysis
Conclusion

Therefore, it is recommended that data literacy workshops for graduate students and postgraduate and doctoral graduates be held regularly to help them acquire the necessary skills for data literacy. Teaching data literacy skills is one of the current challenges in the field of librarianship. The development of data literacy skills requires the policy-making of the Information Science and Science Planning Committee of Iran and the approval of related topics and curricula

Human Touch (Recommended)

Teaching data literacy skills is one of the current challenges in the field of librarianship. The development of data literacy skills requires the policy-making of the Information Science and Science Planning Committee of Iran and the approval of related topics and curricula


Moghadami-Evaluating the Data Literacy of Academic Librarians-104_a.pptx

Moghadami-Evaluating the Data Literacy of Academic Librarians-104_b.pdf
 


ID: 168 / O 1.4: 5
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Data

Knowledge and skills required of data librarians in universities: A qualitative research

Maryam Moghadami

Tehran University, Iran, Islamic Republic of

The purpose of this workshop is to examine the knowledge and skills required of people working in the data management space in universities.
Method: This research is applied in terms of qualitative method and purpose. To examine the research questions, 30 librarians and IT specialists in universities were interviewed.
Findings: The most common set of skills required for the job of data librarian for librarians and IT professionals was technical skills, data knowledge and information technology. From the librarians' point of view, having a broad understanding of data types, metadata and legal frameworks, appropriate information technology knowledge, and teaching and support skills is crucial to playing the role of data manager in academic libraries. Few current data professionals have specific data requirements, and none of the interviewees have received appropriate training in data management in their work.
Discussion and conclusion:
This workshop provides a new insight into the knowledge and skills required for librarians and data managers in Iranian university libraries. Holding training courses for data librarians, data management and metadata, and specialized IT skills courses are necessary to improve the professional skills of librarians and data managers

Biography and Bibliography
Ph.D. candidate of knowledge management
data librarian
researcher in data management

Moghadami-Knowledge and skills required of data librarians in universities-168_a.pptx

Moghadami-Knowledge and skills required of data librarians in universities-168_b.pdf
 


ID: 1112 / O 1.4: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Data

The Radboud University Data Repository: digital preservation throughout the research lifecycle

Didi Lamers, Inge Slouwerhof

Radboud University Library, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

Introduction

At Radboud University a new tool has recently been developed and put into service to archive, publish and share digital research data acquired, processed, and analysed by researchers of the University. This novel repository is named the Radboud University Data Repository.
Aim

To serve researchers throughout the research lifecycle, the mission of the repository is threefold:

  1. To offer long-term internal data preservation for internal re-use
  2. To offer long-term internal data preservation for reproducibility and scientific integrity
  3. To offer FAIR open access data sharing with the external scientific community

Method

The repository allows researchers to archive their data into three types of data collections, collectively corresponding to a single research project. Raw, unprocessed data of the project are preserved in Data Acquisition Collections (DACs). The research process is documented in Research Documentation Collections (RDCs). Data on which a scientific publication is based are stored and publicly shared in Data Sharing Collections (DSCs), which stimulate FAIR data preservation. The collection types serve the goals of long-term internal data preservation for re-use, reproducibility, and scientific integrity (DACs and RDCs) and of FAIR open access data sharing with the external scientific community (DSCs).

The <our organisation> Data Repository is suitable for daily data handling and researchers can collaborate on their data with colleagues from inside and outside of the university by extensive role-based access management. When a data collection is complete, it can be archived (DACs and RDCs) or published (DSCs). Access to published DSCs can be managed by the researcher based on a wide variety of Data Use Agreements. All data collections are made findable by metadata indexing in a searchable resource, the assignment of a persistent identifier (DOI), and the availability of rich metadata fields.
Results

The repository was launched in January 2021. By now (November 2021) it contains 64 data collections. A survey will be used to evaluate user satisfaction.
Conclusion

With the launch of the RDR, <our organisation> now has a tool available that promotes FAIR research data and enhances the impact of its research.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Without having to spend a lot of time on research data management, researchers of <our organisation> can now easily archive or publicly share their research data, enhancing the impact and reproducibility of their research.

Biography and Bibliography
After the successful defense of my PhD thesis in February 2021, I started working as a research data management specialist at Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands. I work as a data steward and product owner of the University’s institutional repository: the Radboud Data Repository. Our repository has been in use since January of this year. A large part of my daily activities consists of communicating with researchers, data stewards, research data management specialists, data architects, and developers to incorporate their feedback and insights in order to maximize the value of our repository. My background is in biology, with a master’s degree in the Molecular Mechanisms of Disease (research master at Radboud University) and a PhD in neuroscience/biophysics at the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, Italy. My research activities taught me about epilepsy, electrophysiology, in vivo imaging, and writing data analysis software, but also about the importance of re-usability and reproducibility of research data. I am happy that in my new position as Data Steward and product owner of the RDR I can help to make the research process more efficient.

Lamers-The Radboud University Data Repository-1112_a.pdf
   
 
Date: Friday, 10/June/2022
10:00am - 10:30amO 2.1: Online Discussion Information Retrieval
Session Chair: Thomas Vandendriessche

The abstracts will not be presented live during this session. You can are advised to view the recorded presentations before this session. Presenters will briefly introduce themselves and then discuss their research, and answers questions.

 
ID: 146 / O 2.1: 1
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

All is FAIR in health inequalities research: using machine learning to build a new database of health equity studies

Mark Clowes1, Claire Stansfield2, James Thomas2, Ian Shemilt2, Suzy Paisley3, Mark Stevenson4, Zhixue Zhao4, Iain Marshall5, Gregory Kell5

1ScHARR, University of Sheffield, UK; 2EPPI Centre, University College London, UK; 3BresMed Health Solutions Limited, UK; 4Department of Computer Science, University of Sheffield, UK; 5King's College London, UK

Introduction
Health inequalities is a rapidly expanding field of research which can make it difficult for researchers and policymakers to stay up to date. A multi-disciplinary team spanning three universities with expertise in computer science, public health and information science has created a new, freely-available database: Finding Accessible Inequalities Research in Public Health (the FAIR Database) to explore research specifically addressing this area.
Aim
To create a new, sustainable database of health inequalities research, indexed according to the PROGRESS-Plus criteria (O’Neill et al 2014). These categories represent the key dimensions of inequality including Place of residence, Race, Occupation, Gender/Sex, Religion, Education, Socioeconomic status and Social capital (PLUS personal characteristics, relationships and time factors).
Method/ Program Description

A systematic search of 14 resources identified 66 reviews to extract Progress Plus attributes for 2190 studies, which were used to train a machine learning application. This algorithm was subsequently used to automatically index new research outputs imported from by Open Alex by study type (e.g. systematic review, observational study) and ProgressPlus categories. Automatic indexing helps to secure the future sustainability of the database beyond the end of the project’s funding, ensuring it remains a useful and current resource for health equity researchers. To allow for browsing as well as searching, Wikipedia categories were used to organise records into a subject hierarchy.

Results/ Evaluation

By using a source repository of scholarly literature from across the internet, the content of the FAIR database is multidisciplinary and not constrained by the usual subject boundaries of other databases. Our own initial testing of the machine learning algorithm finds that it produces accurate indexing results, correctly identifying the study type and ProgressPlus category in the majority of cases but with some variation across the various study types and ProgressPlus categories included (F-measures for the study design classifier ranged between 0.62 and 0.99 and between 0.28 and 0.81 for the ProgressPlus classifier). User evaluation will be conducted in early 2022 and we expect to be able to report on this by the time of the conference.

Conclusion

The FAIR database enables easier discovery of research into health equities, whether through searching or browsing using the PROGRESS-Plus criteria. Automatic importation and indexing of new records from Open Alex (or similar repository) will enable the database to remain up-to-date. This is a work in progress but we will be able to demonstrate the tool and present initial user feedback.

Human Touch (Recommended)

The Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated existing health inequalities and put them to the top of the agenda for governments across Europe. By making research in this area easier to find, we hope to save researchers’ time and increase capacity, enabling policymakers to make better evidence-informed decisions. Moreover, this project has demonstrated the potential to develop projects across disciplines and between institutions, drawing on expertise across those networks. We hope this partnership will continue to deliver further successful projects in the future.

Biography and Bibliography
Mark Clowes is an informaton specialist at ScHARR (the School of Health and Related Research) at the University of Sheffield. From 2020-2021 he was joint chair of the InterTASC Information Specialists' Sub-Group (ISSG). His research interests focus on information retrieval and rapid evidence synthesis.

Claire Stansfield is based in the UCL Institute of Education's EPPI-Centre within the Department of Social Science. She also contributes to the Cochrane Public Health Review Group and Information Retrieval Methods Group, the Campbell Information Retrieval Methods Group, and the NICE Joint Information Group.

Booth, A., Sutton, A., Clowes, M. and Martyn-St James, M. (2021) Systematic approaches to a successful literature review. 3rd ed. Sage.

Stansfield, C., Clowes, M., Thomas, J. and Booth, A. (forthcoming) Searching and identifying studies. (chapter 4). Noyes, J. et al (2022) Cochrane Handbook Of Qualitative Evidence Synthesis. Wiley.

Stansfield, C., Stokes, G., & Thomas, J. (2021). Applying machine classifiers to update searches: analysis from two case studies. Research Synthesis Methods. doi:10.1002/jrsm.1537

Sutton A, Clowes M, Preston L & Booth A (2019) Meeting the review family : exploring review types and associated information retrieval requirements. Health Information and Libraries Journal, 36(3), 202-222

Clowes-All is FAIR in health inequalities research-146_a.mp4
   


ID: 1136 / O 2.1: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Evaluating search strategies used to identify systematic reviews and RCTs for an evidence gap map

Naomi Shaw, Alison Bethel

University of Exeter, United Kingdom

Introduction

Search methods for systematic reviews and other evidence syntheses should be transparent, reproducible and comprehensive. The PRISMA-S checklist requires full search strategies are reported for each bibliographic database, however, these do not provide any indication of the efficiency of the search strategy, or the usefulness of individual search lines for identifying studies for inclusion.

It is becoming increasingly important to evaluate search strategies for evidence syntheses, particularly for those that require regular updates or for ‘living’ reviews, to ensure search strategies are effective and efficient, and to minimise future screening load.

Aim

To identify a simple method for search strategy evaluation and consider how Information Specialists (ISs) can report and share search strategy evaluations.

Method

Searches were conducted to identify systematic reviews (SRs), randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and economic evaluations for an evidence gap map on peer support interventions. Search strategies included a combination of free-text and controlled vocabulary terms.

A search summary table was created to highlight where included studies were found. This indicated 27 of the 32 included SRs, and 50 of the 61 included RCTs were retrieved by the original Ovid MEDLINE searches.

Test sets were created for included references using PubMed identifiers in Ovid MEDLINE. These were used to evaluate each line of the SR and RCT topic search strategies, in order to identify the lines of the search strategy that retrieved included or unique references, and the simplest combination of search terms that would retrieve all included references.
Results

Initial findings indicate that a simple strategy (using only two search lines) would identify all included SRs, whereas a broader range of terminology (12 search lines) is needed to capture all included RCTs. 18 search lines in the peer support strategy for SRs retrieved at least one included SR. 26 search lines in the RCT search strategy picked up at least one included RCT.

We will present further findings from our evaluation of search strategies conducted for an evidence map.

Conclusion

The conduct and reporting of a search strategy evaluation, in addition to a search summary table, may improve search efficiency and minimise screening load for reviews that require frequent updates. These can be time-consuming tasks, however, search strategy evaluation provides opportunities for ISs to reflect on current practice and gather evidence about the value of different search approaches. Reporting details of search strategy evaluation ensures transparency and reproducibility of search methods, and may also guide ISs working on similar topics to make informed decisions about selection of search terms. The IS community could work together to develop simple and effective methods to evaluate search strategies and consider how this knowledge can best be shared.

The authors intend to conduct further research comparing the performance of ‘evaluated’ search strategies with our original search strategies. We will assess the efficiency and number needed to screen for both strategies to inform updates of the living evidence map of peer support interventions.


Shaw-Evaluating search strategies used to identify systematic reviews and RCTs-1136_a.pptx
   


ID: 1130 / O 2.1: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

The impact of using search filters for non-randomised studies on rapid reviews

Irma Klerings, Anna Glechner, Martin Fangmeyer

Danube University Krems, Austria

Introduction

Study selection is one of the major time-consuming tasks in the evidence synthesis process because of the necessity to screen large search results. Therefore, reducing the number or records retrieved is an important way to save time when conducting rapid reviews (RRs). The recently published MEDLINE search filters by Waffenschmidt et al.1 are a promising way to reduce search results when searching for non-randomised controlled studies (cNRS). While they are less sensitive than comparable filters for randomized controlled studies, it is unclear if missed studies would affect review conclusions.
Aim

Based on RR searches that used no study type filters and included cNRS, we retrospectively examined the impact of using the cNRS-filters for Ovid MEDLINE.

We analysed:

  1. The proportion of cNRS included in the reviews that would still be found by the MEDLINE search when the Waffenschmidt filters (sensitivity or specificity focused) are applied,
  2. The reduction in study selection workload due to a smaller search result,
  3. Whether missed studies would have been retrieved by non-Boolean searches,
  4. The impact of missing studies on the conclusions of the original review.

Method

We screened RRs completed at our institution between 2018 and 2021, identifying those that included cNRS and applied no study type filters. For each eligible RR, we identified which cNRS had been found by the original MEDLINE search, and if they would still be found when the search filters were applied. We then checked the reduction of the records retrieved and calculated the potential reduction in screening time. We also checked if missed references would have been found by reference list screening and PubMed similar articles searches used in the original RR. Finally, we are currently assessing if missed studies would have changed the conclusions of the RR.
Results

These are preliminary results; the final analysis will be completed in early 2022.

21 RRs fit our inclusion criteria and included 64 cNRS. The best sensitivity filter (Fsens) retrieved all included studies in 14 reviews, compared to 8 reviews with the best specificity filter (Fspec). Fsens lead to an average reduction of 43% (21%-75%) in retrieved records, Fspec to 56% (39-84%). This represents an average reduction in screening time of 3 hours per reviewer when using Fsens and 4 hours for Fspec. Of 8 studies missed by Fsens, 5 were found by the non-Boolean searches. Fspec missed 17 studies, 10 were found by non-Boolean searches. Using Fspec would have lead to no conclusion being possible in 2 RRs.

Conclusion

Based on preliminary results, using Fsens would reduce screening time without negatively impacting RR conclusions. Additionally, non-Boolean methods were able to retrieve more than half of the studies missed by each filter.

Human Touch

Our rapid review services provide hospital personnel with timely and concise evidence syntheses. By improving our workflows, we aim to provide better support for them.

Reference: 1 Waffenschmidt, et al. Development and validation of study filters for identifying controlled non-randomized studies in PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE. Res Syn Meth. 2020; 11: 617– 626.

Biography and Bibliography
Irma Klerings works as information specialist for the Department for Evidence-based Medicine and Evaluation and Cochrane Austria at Danube University Krems, Austria. She is also an information specialist for the Cochrane Public Health Group. Her main roles are developing search strategies for systematic and rapid reviews, assessing search strategies, and teaching systematic search methods. She also contributes to methods studies in the field of evidence synthesis.

Nussbaumer-Streit, B., Ellen, M., Klerings, I., Sfetcu, R., Riva, N., Mahmić-Kaknjo, M., ... & Gartlehner, G. (2021). Resource use during systematic review production varies widely: a scoping review. Journal of clinical epidemiology, 139, 287-296.
Nussbaumer-Streit, B., Klerings, I., Wagner, G., Heise, T. L., Dobrescu, A. I., Armijo-Olivo, S., ... & Gartlehner, G. (2018). Abbreviated literature searches were viable alternatives to comprehensive searches: a meta-epidemiological study. Journal of clinical epidemiology, 102, 1-11.

Klerings-The impact of using search filters for non-randomised studies-1130_a.pdf

Klerings-The impact of using search filters for non-randomised studies-1130_b.mp4
 


ID: 215 / O 2.1: 5
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Systematic & Scoping Reviews Community of Practice @ UBC

Vanessa Kitchin

UBC, Canada

Introduction
Academic and medical librarians are increasingly being invited to support or co-author knowledge syntheses at University of British Columbia. Arising out of a need to discuss best practices, librarians and interested individuals created a Systematic & Scoping Reviews Community of Practice (SR CoP) at UBC.
Aim

A community of practice is a group of people who "share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly". The concept was first proposed by cognitive anthropologist Jean Lave and educational theorist Etienne Wenger in their 1991 book Situated Learning. The aim of this session is to explore how the SR CoP was developed at UBC and how members adere to Lave and Wenger's definition.

Method/ Program Description
The evolution of the SR CoP will be described as well as the issues, concerns, successes and novel insights.
Results/ Evaluation

In order for a community of practice to be successful, it must be consistent in differentiating its dynamic from that of a working group or committee. The SR CoP at <our organization> has been successful in remaining a space where librarians from all disciplines supporting reviews can discuss issues. Participation is fluid, not mandatory and guests/topics vary month to month.
Conclusion

The SR Community of Practice at UBC has become an invaluable space to share insights and issues related to the support and authorshop of knowledge syntheses.

Human Touch (Recommended)

In talking to colleauges at research intensive universities, a common thread is the aspiration to develop a Knowledge Synthesis Community of Practice. This oral presentation will hopefully spark ideas and inspiration for others to do the same.


Kitchin-Systematic & Scoping Reviews Community of Practice @ UBC-215_a.mp4
   


ID: 1131 / O 2.1: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Going beyond the traditional roles: Importance of partnership working

Mala Mann1, Rhiannon Cordiner1, Annmarie Nelson2, Anthony Byrne2

1Specialist Unit for Review Evidence, Cardiff University, Wales; 2Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Centre (MCPCRC), School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Wales

Introduction

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) has expanded the role of the librarian beyond identification of the literature only, to be involved in other stages of the evidence review process.
Aim

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the role of the librarian in conducting evidence synthesis in partnership with clinicians, health care workers, researchers, and policy makers. We will examine a series of rapid reviews conducted during the last five years to support professionals and other decision-makers working in palliative care.
Method

The literature searches were conducted across a range of databases and supplementary sources. In addition to designing and running the literature searches, other tasks included carrying out screening and study selection, developing data extraction forms and carrying out quality assessment of the eligible studies. Final tasks included synthesising evidence and writing the review using reporting templates in collaboration with researchers.
Results

To date, twelve reviews have been conducted using a methodology developed in partnership with the research team. Findings will be presented from the start of the process at the point of partnership working, to development of the review and subsequent follow up to demonstrate impact. The evidence from these reviews impacts directly on palliative care clinicians and other decision makers, and indirectly on patients/carers in receipt of palliative care.

Conclusion

Broadening horizons provides opportunities for information professionals in health care to play an invaluable role. Librarians can be effective partners in supporting researchers to practice evidence-based medicine.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Being integrated into a research team is an invaluable experience and contributing to other aspects of the review process can be rewarding. It provides opportunities to develop our expertise and remain relevant in an ever-changing world.

Biography and Bibliography
I am an Information Specialist/Systematic Reviewer based at Cardiff University's Specialist Unit for Review Evidence (SURE), with expertise in systematic reviewing for over 20 years. My particular expertise is in advanced literature searching and the development of systematic review methodologies. I have worked on projects for a range of organisations including the National Institute for Health & Care Excellence (NICE), National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) the Welsh Government and Public Health Wales. I have co-authored over 100 publications including Cochrane reviews and methodology papers. Current projects include conducting reviews for Cardiff University Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Centre, Wales COVID-19 Evidence Centre and the Centre for Homelessness Impact.
In addition, I teach evidence-based methodologies on several internal and external programmes including Cardiff University Doctoral Academy and lead the Cardiff Systematic Review Course. I have jointly supervised intercalated degree and postgraduate students who are involved in carrying out a systematic review as a component within their degree programme.

Bibliography

•Edwards, Deborah, Anstey, Sally, Coffey, Michael, Gill, Paul, Mann, Mala, Meudell, Alan and Hannigan, Ben 2021. End of life care for people with severe mental illness: Mixed methods systematic review and thematic synthesis (the MENLOC study). Palliative Medicine 35(10), pp. 1747-1760. (10.1177/02692163211037480)
•Harrop, Emily, Mann, Mala, Semedo, Lenira, Chao, Davina, Selman, Lucy E. and Byrne, Anthony. 2020. What elements of a systems approach to bereavement are most effective in times of mass bereavement? A narrative systematic review with lessons for COVID-19. Palliative Medicine 34(9), pp. 1165-1181. (10.1177/0269216320946273)
•Oakley, Natalie Jayne, Kneale, Dylan, Mann, Mala, Hilliar, Mariann, Dayan, Colin, Gregory, John W and French, Robert 2020. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and educational attainment in childhood: a systematic review. BMJ Open 10(1), article number: e033215. (10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033215)
•Nurmatov, Ulugbek, Foster, Catherine, Bezeczky, Zoe, Owen, Jennifer, El-Banna, Asmaa, Mann, Mala, Petrou, Stavros, Kemp, Alison, Scourfield, Jonathan, Forrester, Donald and Turley, Ruth2020. Impact of shared decision-making family meetings on children's out-of-home care, family empowerment and satisfaction: a systematic review. Project Report. [Online]. London: What Works Centre for Children's Social Care. Available at: https://whatworks-csc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/WWCSC_Family_Group_Conferencing_Report.pdf
•Mann, Mala, Woodward, Amanda, Nelson, Annmarie and Byrne, Anthony 2019. Palliative Care Evidence Review Service (PaCERS): a knowledge transfer partnership. Health Research Policy and Systems 17(1), article number: 100. (10.1186/s12961-019-0504-4)

Mann-Going beyond the traditional roles-1131_a.pptx
   


ID: 1161 / O 2.1: 7
Oral Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Search Summary Table results for an evidence gap map

Alison Bethel, Naomi Shaw

University of Exeter, United Kingdom

Introduction

Search Summary Tables (SSTs) offer a simple way to provide an overview of the results of the searches in evidence syntheses. It combines the details from the PRISMA flow diagram with the search methods including sensitivity and precision calculations for each database, and overall. They can be used as evidence to inform future searching for the individual information professional and, if published with the systematic review/map, for the wider evidence syntheses community.

Previous SST have only been published for systematic reviews, this project will create a SST for an evidence gap map.

Aim

Create search summary tables (SSTs) for the different types of study: systematic review (SR), randomised controlled trial (RCT) and economic evaluation from an evidence gap map on peer support interventions. This is to help understand where the evidence was found for each study type and whether supplementary search techniques found any additional relevant studies.

Method/ Program Description

The searches for the Srs were run first followed by the searches for RCTs and finally the economic evaluations. The supplementary searching was all undertaken at the same time. Once the evidence gap map had been completed, the included references for each study type was input into the SST. The EndNote libraries with all of the search results (ie before duplicates were removed) were searched to find out which search in which database picked up the reference. This was carried out for all three study types.

Results/ Evaluation

The results presented will include: what database combinations would have found all of the included references, which database searches found unique references, which supplementary search methods found included references and which searches did not pick up included references which were in the database; and why.

Any results about the differences between searching for SRs, RCTs and EEs will also be presented.

Conclusion

Completing a SST can take time but it is a great learning tool for the information professional (IP) working on the project as it encourages reflection and learning, it also encourages transparency, not just of the search methods but of the search results, and provides evidence for the decisions we make as IPs. This is the first SST produced for an evidence gap map in the subject area of health and we are expecting that it will evolve into a living map and we will continue to complete SSTs to discover whether the search patterns stay the same over time.

Human Touch (Recommended)

We think SSTs are a great way for IPs to reflect on their work and share knowledge with others

Biography and Bibliography
I have over 10 years’ experience in developing and running searches for all types of evidence syntheses including systematic reviews and maps, rapid reviews and realist reviews as well as evidence briefings. Along with my colleagues, I provide advice and training to colleagues, students and clinicians on how to search.Prior to that I worked in both Government and research libraries.

Bethel-Search Summary Table results for an evidence gap map-1161_a.pptx
   
 
10:30am - 11:00amO 2.2: Online Discussion Resources and Metrics
Session Chair: Wichor Bramer

The abstracts will not be presented live during this session. You can are advised to view the recorded presentations before this session. Presenters will briefly introduce themselves and then discuss their research, and answers questions.

 
ID: 221 / O 2.2: 1
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Publishing pandemics, retractions and the role of medical librarians

Ivana Majer, Lea Škorić

University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Croatia

Introduction
The unprecedented increase in the publication of papers during the COVID-19 pandemic has altered established patterns of scientific communication. In order to publish the results of the research as soon as possible, oversights in the editorial and review process can occur. Due to misconduct or errors, some published papers get retracted. However, once the information is published and it’s publicly available, it can never be completely withdrawn. Retracted papers continue to be used and cited, or they continue their life through papers that cited them before the retraction. In the field of clinical medicine and public health, this can lead to dangerous consequences.
Aim
Based on a set of retracted COVID-19 journal papers, we aim to investigate the time between publication and retraction, citations of retracted papers, and most importantly - the reasons for retractions. In the light of the findings we will discuss the opportunities for medical librarians to engage in educating students, physicians, and scientists regarding advanced information literacy skills and scientific publishing in general.

Methods
Retractions of journal papers on SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 were identified using the running list of retracted papers available on the Retraction Watch webpage (1). The time span from manuscript submission till acceptance and the time span between publication and retraction date were investigated. Visibility of retraction notice was investigated on journals' web, in PubMed and in Web of Science Core Collection database. Type of retraction and the reasons for retractions were analyzed, as well as, citations in the WoS CC database.

Results
On January 2nd 2022 there were 164 published journal papers on COVID-19 listed in the Retraction Watch webpage. The reasons for retraction vary, and for many they are unclear or even unknown. A lack of data on date of retraction is also noticeable. Visibility of the retraction notice varies on publishers' websites and in bibliographic databases, and a significant number of papers remain unmarked and still available in original form. In addition, our findings show that many of the retracted papers continue to be cited.

Conclusion

Non-transparent retractions and subsequent use of retracted papers undermine trust in science, both among scientists and the public. Medical libraries play an important role in educating students, physicians and scientists in information literacy and critical thinking skills, and in responsible and ethical use of literature. Central Medical Library, affiliated with the University of Zagreb School of Medicine (UZSM), accomplishes this by participating in various courses at all levels of study programs, and through informal workshops and face-to-face informal consultations. Lessons learned from the analysis of retracted papers can be of great use for these activities.

Human Touch

All these activities empower medical librarians to connect with their users and patrons, create partnership networks, but also to initiate a dialogue on questionable topics and practices.

References:

1. Retractionwatch. Retracted coronavirus (COVID-19) papers. [cited 2022 Jan 2]. Available from: https://retractionwatch.com/retracted-coronavirus-covid-19-papers/

Biography and Bibliography
IVANA MAJER graduated from the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Zagreb, and got her degree in Croatian Language and Literature and Information Sciences (MLIS). She works as a librarian at the Central Medical Library at the University of Zagreb School of Medicine. Areas of her interest include subject cataloguing and indexing, scientific communication and publishing, digital repositories, and methodology of writing scientific and research papers with a special emphasis on language editing.

Bibliography:
- Markulin H, Majer I. [Academic librarian as the author of the exhibition: the example of the Central medical library exhibition celebrating the 100th anniversary of the University of Zagreb School of medicine]. Vjesnik bibliotekara Hrvatske. 2020;63(1-2):479-502.
- Majer I, Šember M. [Conferences as a form of users’ continuing education: the example of the Central medical library at the University of Zagreb School of medicine]. Vjesnik bibliotekara Hrvatske. 2018;61(2):325-42.

LEA ŠKORIĆ, Ph.D., works as a head of Central Medical Library at the University of Zagreb School of Medicine. In addition to planning, organization and management of the Library, she is involved in scientific research work, and regularly participates in teaching activities on undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate level. She publishes scientific and professional papers in scientific journals, actively participates in international and domestic professional conferences and reviews papers for Croatian scientific journals. She is a member of several expert committees at the School of Medicine, and works on projects at the University of Zagreb and at the national level.
Her interests include scientific publishing, methods of quantitative and qualitative evaluation of scientific papers, open access, open science, biomedical information systems organization, information literacy, theory and practice of subject cataloguing and library management.

Bibliography:
- Macan B, Škorić L, Petrak J. David among Goliaths: Open access publishing in scientific (semi-)periphery. Learned Publishing. 2020;33(4):410-17.
- Škorić L, Glasnović A, Petrak J. A publishing pandemic during the COVID-19 pandemic: How challenging can it become? Croat Med J. 2020;61(2):79-81.
- Vrkić D, Škorić L, Petrak J. Altmetrics of papers from scientific periphery reflect global trends: a case study of publications by Zagreb University School of Medicine. Journal of Academic Librarianship. 2017;43(6):479-86.
- Škorić L, Petrak J. Croatian medical journals and standards for good editing practice: an author instructions analysis. Lijec Vjesn. 2017;139(7-8):204-10.
- Šember M, Škoric L, Petrak J. Current impact of ceased journals: Are they still alive? Malaysian Journal of Library and Information Science. 2017;22(1):15-27.
- Škorić, L., Vrkić, D., Petrak, J. Current state of open access to journal publications from the University of Zagreb School of Medicine. Croat Med J. 2016;57(1):71-6.
- Škorić L, Šember M, Markulin H, Petrak J. Information literacy in the graduate study curriculum at the School of medicine, University of Zagreb. Vjesnik bibliotekara Hrvatske. 2012;55(3-4):17-28.

Majer-Publishing pandemics, retractions and the role of medical librarians-221_a.pdf

Majer-Publishing pandemics, retractions and the role of medical librarians-221_b.pptx
 


ID: 1145 / O 2.2: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Effective training to enhance author tracking citations to boost research evaluation

Elisabetta Poltronieri, Cristina Mancini, Giuse Ardita, Donatella Gentili, Maria Salvatorina Graziani, Paola Pecci, Filippo Santoro, Monica Zedda, Paola De Castro

Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy

Introduction
Author disambiguation (variants of author name) stands for a crucial point for information professionals committed to updating authors' profile in citation databases of multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed literature (Web of Science and Scopus).

By implementing the training of the internal research staff on how measuring impact of scientific papers, the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS, Italian National Institute of Health) is committed to fully comply with the internal policy on archiving procedures and promoting open access publications, recently signed by the ISS President.

Aim
ISS has recently set up an internal task force aiming at supporting internal research staff (about 1000 people) in the daily practice of checking paper lists under their profile, to avoid misidentification and to get effective metrics score (H index etc.). This is a central objective of research evaluation process and reporting of annual activities to obtain funding. The constant effort is that of providing current training and continuing educational tools to enable researchers managing their own profiles on the platforms devoted to host citations and metrics.
Method/ Program Description

A methodological approach has been developed to help researchers to become more familiar in building on their unique identifiers (ResearcherID, ScopusID and ORCID), thus mantaining accurate accounts.

Further efforts for improving quality of scientific communication and transparency of research results (publications and data) are being undertaken within a recently set ISS working group on Integrity of research.

In this perspective, the ISS institutional repository OAI – PMH compliant, PublISS (https://publ.iss.it), is planning to implement the ORCID API aimed at linking authors and all their name variants with their publications. Interconnecting PublISS with ORCID Registry can help populating author profiles, thus improving search and retrieval of biomedical literature to support networking and collaboration.

Results/ Evaluation

Critical issues linked to changing platforms interfaces, level of author’s autonomy in managing their accounts, number of researchers equipped with unique identifiers and testing of users' navigation skills will be analysed and evaluated.
Conclusion

Deeply inspiring activities for assessing research effectiveness were those carried on under the umbrella of DORA (Declaration of Research Assessment) and TARA (Advance Research Assessment) project. Both initiatives aim at re-affirming the importance of best practises for the evaluation of scholarly research based on a responsible use of metrics, thus avoiding inappropriate manipulation of quantitative research impact, in view of adopting criteria and standards to reform research assessment.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This work is intended to strenghten close collobaration and networking culture among colleagues dealing with different tasks within the same Instituion (IT expert, librarians, scientific information professionals, researchers) in order to improve the whole institutional performance.

All the above-described components of the scholarly communication system accelerate the process of a virtuous engagement of all stakeholders acting within the scientific research community.

Biography and Bibliography
Elisabetta Poltronieri, is working at the Scientific Communication Service of the Italian Institute of Health, the leading research body in Italy in the field of public health.
Her main responsibilities include bibliographic editing and the diffusion of scientific work published by the Institute research staff.

Poltronieri-Effective training to enhance author tracking citations to boost research evaluation-1145_a.pdf
   


ID: 1229 / O 2.2: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Innovations in preprint peer review - What new forms of peer review does preprinting facilitate?

Susana Oliveira Henriques1,2,3, Ludo Waltman1,2, Stephen Pinfield1,4, Naemin Rzayeva1,2

1Research on Research Institute; 2Centre for Science and Technology Studies, Leiden University; 3School of Medicine, University of Lisbon; 4University of Sheffield

Introduction

The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the importance of an effective scholarly communication system. Traditional scholarly communication channels, particularly peer-reviewed journals, have been put under pressure to deal with Covid-19-related research in a timely way. At the same time, there was an unprecedented rise in the use of preprints by the biomedical scientific community. Preprint servers make work available rapidly (albeit usually in a form before peer review) and openly, meaning they can be accessed in a timely way by scientists, policymakers, medical practitioners, journalists, and citizens in general. Although preprints have played an essential role in the dissemination of research about Covid-19, concerns remain about quality assurance and misinformation as potential risks to public health.

Aim

We provide an overview of recent innovative projects that enable evaluative peer interactions (e.g., comments, recommendations, reviews), addressing the need for more transparent and responsible use of preprints. Also, we identify future trends and provide recommendations. Finally, we aim to promote discussion about the role of preprint peer review in the scholarly communication system and the contributions that different actors in the system can make to these developments.

Method/ Program Description

Based on the ReimagineReview registry developed by ASAPbio, we collected information on 44 projects that provide innovation in peer review, particularly peer review of preprints. Detailed information on each project was collected through online research and organised into four main categories: i) general description; ii) peer review process; iii) sustainability; and iv) maturity.

Results/ Evaluation

Globally, data show us that different groups (e.g., individuals, publishers, and professional societies), from various disciplinary fields, with different aims and needs, are involved in the development of innovative projects to increase speed, quality, transparency, incentivisation, or fairness of peer review. Also, we observe the emergence of different types of quality assessment (e.g., free-form commenting, badges, and quantitative scores), new patterns of communication (e.g., interaction between authors, reviewers and the public in general) and innovative approaches to peer review (e.g., pre or post-publication peer review, public commenting, public recommendation, quantitative scores or summaries of the evidence). As this is an ongoing project, we can only present provisional results mainly from the first two categories listed above.

Conclusion

It is too early to assess the long-term sustainability and impact of the various projects and the way in which these projects fit the aims and needs of different stakeholders. Nevertheless, our work does show that several valuable services are being provided. It also shows how these services could potentially improve trust in research reporting, and it highlights future trends in scholarly communication and peer review.

Human Touch (Recommended)

The scientific peer review system is overburdened, and there appears to be a growing dissatisfaction among authors, reviewers and journal editors. Our work suggests improvements that could make the system more informal, collaborative, rapid, open, public and transparent, which will hopefully help to turn peer review into a more rewarding experience for all stakeholders involved.

Biography and Bibliography
Susana Oliveira Henriques is an External PhD candidate at the Centre for Science and Technology Studies, Leiden University. Susana’s research interests include innovation in scholarly communication and peer review, with a special focus on dissemination and quality control of biomedical research. She is also interested in research management, science policy and responsible use of metrics. Susana holds a degree in History and a Master in Library Sciences. She is head of the Central Library - Center for Information and Documentation of the University of Lisbon School of Medicine, where she is also a guest teacher of Evidence Based Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Public Health.
ORCID: 0000-0002-0947-5083

Recent publication:
Waltman, Ludo; Pinfield, Stephen; Rzayeva, Narmin; Oliveira Henriques, Susana; Fang, Zhichao; Brumberg, Johanna; et al. (2021): Scholarly communication in times of crisis: The response of the scholarly communication system to the COVID-19 pandemic. Research on Research Institute. Report.https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.17125394.v1

Henriques-Innovations in preprint peer review-1229_a.pdf
   


ID: 1128 / O 2.2: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Maximise the research impact of your institution: a use case of Ghent University Hospital

Greet Wieme1, Muguet Koobasi1, Ann De Meulemeester1, Anniek Toye2, Renaat R. Peleman1, Nele S. Pauwels1

1Knowledge Centre for Health Ghent, Ghent University, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 2Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

Aim: Healthcare professionals and hospital policy makers are providing the best possible care on a daily basis, ensuring sustainable hospital performance and effectively managing costs. Next to healthcare analytics, key performance indicators reflecting the scientific output and impact are crucial for academic hospitals. Research metrics - traditional and next-generation - drive policy decisions and allocation of funds.

Methods: A bibliometric analysis of the impact and output of Ghent University Hospital was performed using InCites and Altmetric Explorer. The analysis was performed for the hospital and for each of the approximately 60 medical departments. The results of these analyses were presented to various policy-making bodies of the hospital and Ghent University that is the hospitals’ parent organisation. To optimise our analysis, we formulated actions on the level of the analysis tool and actions towards researchers.

Results: Thanks to the recruitment of a new member on our team, an awareness campaign for our researchers was rolled out. As a result of information sessions, workshops, an infographic, an interactive Power BI presentation and personal assistance, we made our researchers aware of how to correctly affiliate to our hospital and to create, use and update their ORCID iDs. Additionally, medical departments were encouraged to standardise their affiliation to their department. We started to contact Ghent University Hospital employees with an ORCID iD to connect their ORCID iD to their Ghent University profile. Over a 7 week period, we had a success rate of 44% (38/86), but this is continuously evolving.

Furthermore, we analysed articles published by our researchers that were not automatically linked to our hospital in Web of Science. We identified synonyms and variants that were used for our institution. By adding these synonyms and variants in Web of Science, more than 2000 publications (>600 publications in 2016-2020) were additionally assigned to our institution. This resulted in an increase of 8% of publications correctly linked with Ghent University Hospital and in an important gain of analytical information in InCites.

Conclusion: Generally speaking for researchers, the availability of metrics depends on their research output being available online. Research that is openly available, will be accessible to more people and will, therefore, have a greater impact. Recently, xxxx initiated a project to increase the visibility of research being conducted at Ghent University Hospital, which is the cornerstone of research metrics. Thanks to our two-sided approach – on the level of the researcher and the analysis tool – analyses conducted for our institution are more accurate and will be increasingly more accurate in the future. Research performed at Ghent University (Hospital) will thus become more visible to the public and the government for policy decisions and financial support. During this session, experiences and lessons learnt will be shared to inspire others who perform bibliometric analyses

Human touch of your submission in your abstract: We note that despite all the information campaigns and sessions, personal support on bibliometrics is vital. We will, therefore, continue to work on this aspect.


Wieme-Maximise the research impact of your institution-1128_a.pdf

Wieme-Maximise the research impact of your institution-1128_b.mp4
 


ID: 1139 / O 2.2: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

The use of Handle System on institutional repositories and their connection with alternative metrics

Elena Pastor-ramon1, Lluís Codina2, Cristòfol Rovira2

1Virtual Health Sciences of the Balearic Islands, University Pompeu Fabra, Spain; 2University Pompeu Fabra, Spain

Introduction

There are about 164 institutional repositories (IR) from EAHIL countries registered in OpenDoar. Many of these repositories are not using the Handle System (HS) as a persistent identifier (PI).

Also, they are not showing the altmetrics offered by Altmetric and PlumX, and many have not installed the API that allows to measure the altmetrics of the documents in these IR.

PI with which the altmetrics work take into account the DOI, if the document does not have it, PMID or the ArxiV identifier are detected. The HS, although the instructions offered by the providers of these metrics tell us that it works as a PI, the reality is that the only way to see the impact in a document with just HS assigned is to put the badge of one of these tools or installing their APIs.

Aims

To show how many IR from EAHIL member countries are assigning handles to their records, as well as to know if these repositories are collecting information from Altmetric and PlumX.

Also, we want to provide a checklist with those characteristics that an IR should have to provide as much information as possible on these metrics to be efficient and give value to the documents deposited in it.

Method

A search was carried out in OpenDoar limiting to IR, which had journal articles and limiting to the subjects "Health and Medicine" and Psychology, then we searched limited to each country with EAHIL partners. An Excel document was created in which we added the fields of the institution, URL of the repository, if it had a handle, if it had other persistent identifiers, if it had information on alternative metrics and if it did not have this information if it could at least be tracked by these bibliometric tools.

Results

Many of the European repositories are not assigning a HS to their records, they give generic URLs that could mean that if that repository changed domains its records could no longer be found and all the information for that record would have to be provided again. By not providing a handle, the different social impact measurement tools may not be able to detect this information. Furthermore, although these repositories do assign the HS, by not having installed the API or not having notified Altmetric or PlumX so that they can be tracked by them, they do not allow these metrics to detect the information of the repository's records, which means that the impact they may be having is not known.

Conclusion

Although great advances have been made in the creation of IR, many of them are still in elementary stages. Our analysis provides an insight into the current situation of institutional repositories in health, medicine, and psychology from EAHIL partners in terms of the use of PI, especially the HS. We also show a picture of how altmetrics are being used by country, we want to show if they are being given the importance that Altmetric and PlumX seem to have in theory.

Biography and Bibliography
Elena Pastor-Ramon, a librarian from the Virtual Health Sciences Library (Bibliosalut) since 2003 and Ph.D. student from the University Pompeu Fabra since 2020.

Pastor-Ramon, Elena; Páez, Virgili (2021). «Mejora del impacto mediante difusión de la investigación en redes sociales: #PublicaSalutIB». Investigación Bibliotecológica: archivonomía, bibliotecología e información, v. 35, n. 88, p. 29.
https://doi.org/10.22201/iibi.24488321xe.2021.88.58355

Pastor-Ramon, Elena; Codina, Lluís; Rovira, Cristòfol (2021). «Value of Digital Object Identifier in Academic Journals and Its Influence on Social and Academic Impact: Nursing Journals Experience». En: Abstract Book Workshop Proceedings Abstract Book,

García-puente, María; Pastor-ramon, Elena; Agirre, Oskia; Morán, José-maría; García-puente, María; Pastor-ramon, Elena (2020). «Research note. Open letter to the users of the new PubMed: a critical appraisal», pp. 1-5.

Dr. Lluís Codina and Dr. Cristòfol Rovira, are professors from the University Pompeu Fabra.

Pastor-ramon-The use of Handle System on institutional repositories and their connection with alternative_a.pptx
   


ID: 1111 / O 2.2: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

How Health Education England and NHS Librarians collaborated to share and peer review COVID-19 literature searches during the pandemic

Helene Gorring1, Lindsay Snell2

1Health Education England, United Kingdom; 2University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom

Background

In response to the evident need to enable more sharing and reduce duplication during the COVID-19 pandemic, Health Education England (HEE) mobilised a group of expert searchers from across the NHS in England. With many NHS library staff redeployed in the first wave of the pandemic, HEE was keen to make a shared bank of literature searches relating to COVID-19 available to NHS staff who had limited access to library services and expert searchers.

The group worked at speed to develop a database and health librarians were invited to submit searches and strategies they had completed on Covid topics. The expert searchers conducted light touch peer review before making content available on the Knowledge for Healthcare website.

Objectives

The aim of our study was to document the origins of the Covid-19 search bank, evaluate attitudes of the NHS health library community towards it, and capture learning from the expert searchers about their experiences project.

Methods

Structured interviews with the peer reviewers were conducted, and a survey of the NHS library community using the search bank was undertaken.

Results

A total of 258 searches were submitted to the group between mid-March and beginning of December 2020, of which 209 were included in the search bank. 85 health librarians responded to the survey and interviews yielded valuable qualitative data.

Both the survey and interview responses demonstrated the strong ethos of collaboration in the NHS library community and a desire to contribute to the disaster response to the pandemic by sharing, saving others time and effort.

Discussion and Conclusion

Peer review is a sensitive topic, but important for quality assurance and valuable professional development. We found that a buddy system is particularly beneficial for peer reviewers, but that a clearer structure for a peer review process is needed.

The project identified that the quality of searches is variable, and that even competent searchers displayed a lack of confidence in their abilities. It was clear that in any future search bank initiatives feedback on searches and strategies submitted should be provided to critique work and provide suggestions.

Neither the survey or interviews validated the need or appetite for a non-topic-specific search bank. It was identified that any future search banks need a clear purpose as searches are otherwise too diverse. Search strategies were considered more useful as a resource than the searches themselves which quickly go out of date.

The main weakness of the project was found to be the lack of clearer guidance for contributors. Whilst this was due to the evolving nature of the initiative, the limited research available at the start of the pandemic, and that the group sought to take a pragmatic and responsive approach, clearer parameters would need to be in place for any future search bank.

All the peer reviewers involved in this initiative clearly felt it to have been a personally and professionally rewarding process with positive impacts on their practice and other benefits such as wider networking with health librarians.

Biography and Bibliography
Hélène Gorring

Helene has worked at Health Education England since 2018, working at a national and regional level (London & the South East) level to provide professional support to NHS librarians on resource discovery.
Prior to this she was Library Manager for a mental health NHS Trust in Birmingham for 12 years.
Helene was International Officer for CILIP’s Health Libraries Group for many years, working with Partnerships in Health Information (Phi) to run a bursary for health librarians from Low and Middle Income Countries and also managing the Core Collections series of books.

Lindsay Snell

Lindsay is a Clinical Librarian, providing knowledge and evidence support to a number of teams and groups within University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust. She previously worked in outreach roles supporting primary care and community based staff. She is an experienced searcher, with a particular interest in literature searches provided to clinical and managerial staff to support their day to day work.

Gorring-How Health Education England and NHS Librarians collaborated to share and peer review COVID-19 liter_a.pptx
   


ID: 1151 / O 2.2: 7
Oral Presentation
Topics: Resources and metrics

Computational assistance in the analysis of cited references in biomedical literature: a case study from two institutions

Teresa Lee1, Pablo Iriarte2, Floriane Sophie Muller2, Ramon Cierco Jimenez1

1International Agency for Research on Cancer, France; 2Library of the University of Geneva

Introduction
At Institution A, a building move in 2022 requires a 40% reduction of its physical collection and a weeding strategy for the library’s print journals. From this scenario a question emerges: how old, on average, is the literature cited by in-house scientists in their own publications? According to Kaplan et al.1 recent materials are accessed more frequently than older ones, with a significant drop for anything older than 15 years. In this project, we empirically test this assertion using computational assistance. Institution A’s librarian teamed up with a doctoral student in bioinformatics to parse citations retrieved from Web of Science based on an OG (enhanced organization) field search. University of B collaborators joined the experimental effort to test not only Kaplan et al.’s rule1, but to interrogate the dataset in ways that may shed light on historic citation trends, open-access and the electronic availability of research literature, the lasting prominence of super-cited references, and more.
Aim
1. To build a librarian-friendly utility for the parsing of Web of Science records that allows analysis of the cited items associated with the primary set of records.
2. To see whether the 15-year rule for cited literature holds true of the article outputs of Institution A and the University of B’s biomedical faculty.
3. To ascertain what other findings regarding historical citation trends, open-access and the electronic availability of literature arise from an experimental parsing and interrogation of the dataset resulting from Web of Science affiliation-based searches.
Methods
Sets of records based on OG (enhanced organization) field searches for the University of B and for Institution A will be retrieved and parsed using Python2 or R3. A methodology for cleaning up the parsed set of records will be determined, implemented, and reported. Parsed and cleaned data from this initial process will be correlated with data from other sources of information (for e.g., CrossRef) to find answers to questions that go beyond what analysing Web of Science records alone can provide
Results
TBA
Conclusion
TBA
References
1. Kaplan R, Steinberg M, Doucette J. Retention of retrospective print journals in the digital age: trends and analysis. J Med Libr Assoc. 2006;94(4):387-e200.
2. Van Rossum, G., & Drake Jr, F. L. (1995). Python reference manual. Centrum voor Wiskunde en Informatica Amsterdam.
3. R Core Team (2021). R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. URL https://www.R-project.org/.
Human Touch (Recommended)
Multidisciplinary collaboration; experimentation

Biography and Bibliography
Teresa Lee is the Knowledge Manager at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (UARC/WHO), where she leads the central publications programme, library and web services.

Pablo Iriarte is the IT coordinator of the University of Geneva Library since 2017. He studied physics and worked for several years at the Lausanne University Hospital as IT manager for the Medical Library and the Documentation and Data unit of the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine.

Floriane Muller works as a full-time scientific librarian for the medical and pharmaceutical unit of the University of Geneva Library since 2015. Initially responsible of the interlibrary loan and document delivery service, she is now in charge of Open Access, Publishing and Research Data Management support. She has a master’s degree in Information Science from the University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland.

Ramon Cierco Jimenez is a PhD student in bioinformatics from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) doing his project at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in Lyon (France). He has a master’s degree in Omics data analysis, and a univeristiy degree in Biotechnology, both from the Univeristat de Vic - Universitat Central de Catalunya (UVIC-UCC)

Lee-Computational assistance in the analysis of cited references in biomedical literature-1151_a.pptx
   
 
11:00am - 12:00pmO 2.3: Online Discussion Workshops
Session Chair: Hans Ket

The workshops will not be presented live during this session. Each workshop presenter wil have 3 minutes to present the outcomes of their workshop. After that, the floor is open to discuss the topics, and ask questions.

 
ID: 1116 / O 2.3: 1
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Professionals Connected

Exchange of experiences: How can medical research libraries support open science practices of their researchers?

Jasmin Schmitz

ZB MED - Information Centre for Life Sciences, Germany

Biography and Bibliography
Jasmin Schmitz received a PhD in information science. She worked as a freelance trainer for a commercial provider for scientific information and as scientific project coordinator in the field of bibliometrics. At ZB MED she is responsible for the Open Access Advisory Services.
For publication, talks etc.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1427-1808

Schmitz-Exchange of experiences-1116_a.pptx
 


ID: 1115 / O 2.3: 2
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Explore tools and automation for supporting systematic review and guideline processes

Muguet Koobasi, Ann De Meulemeester, Renaat Peleman, Nele Pauwels

Knowledge Centre for Health Ghent, Ghent University, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium

Biography and Bibliography
Muguet Koobasi is an information specialist at the Knowledge Centre for Health Ghent (University of Ghent and University Hospital Ghent) where she provides courses, aims to improve information literacy for health sciences and supports and advises stakeholders on searching, processing and publishing literature. She also works independently with organisations involved in writing systematic reviews or guidelines. She has a background in guideline development in the area of kidney disease and is skilled in collecting, organising and disseminating information. She has a specific interest in implementing specialised technology and tools aiming to improve the processes relevant to systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines.

Bibliography:
- Oniscu G.C., Abramowicz D., Bolignano D., Gandolfini I., Hellemans R., Maggiore U., Nistor I., O'Neill S., Sever M.S., Koobasi M., Nagler E.V. (2021). Management of obesity in kidney transplant candidates and recipients: A clinical practice guideline by the Descartes working group of ERA. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfab310 (Online ahead of print)
- Van Acker P., Van Biesen W., Nagler E.V., Koobasi M., Veys N., Vanmassenhove J. (2021). Risk prediction models for acute kidney injury in adults: An overview of systematic reviews. PLoS One. 2021 16(4): e0248899. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0248899
- Gallieni M., Hollenbeck M., Inston N., Kumwenda M., Powell S., Tordoir J., Al Shakarchi J., Berger P., Bolignano D., Cassidy D., Chan T.Y., Dhondt A., Drechsler C.,
Ecder T., Finocchiaro P., Haller M., Hanko J., Heye S., Ibeas J., Jemcov T., Kershaw S., Khawaja A., Labriola L., Lomonte C., Malovrh M., Marti I Monros A., Matthew S., McGrogan D., Meyer T., Mikros S., Nistor I., Planken N., Roca-Tey R., Ross R., Troxler M., van der Veer S., Vanholder R., Vermassen F., Welander G., Wilmink T., Koobasi M., Fox J., Van Biesen W., Nagler E. (2019). Clinical practice guideline on peri- and postoperative care of arteriovenous fistulas and grafts for haemodialysis in adults. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation ;34(Suppl 2):ii1-ii42. doi: 10.1093/ndt/gfz072.

Dr. Nele Pauwels works currently (since 2015) as Information Specialist at the Knowledge Center for Health Ghent. After she obtained her PhD in Medical Sciences, Nele worked as staff member at Center for Evidence-Based Practice of the Belgian Red Cross-Flanders. She developed evidence-based guidelines and systematic reviews, according to international gold standards. Currently, she supports researchers during all stages of performing and writing a systematic review by give workshops and by giving individual guidance. Topics of her workshops are ‘advanced searching in several (bio)medical databases’, and ‘tools for systematic reviews (e.g. Rayyan and DistillerSR)’, and ‘conducting and publishing a systematic review and meta-analysis’.

Bibliography:
- Rammant, E., Van Wilder, L., Van Hemelrijck, M., Pauwels, N. S., Decaestecker, K., Van Praet, C., Bultijnck, R., Ost, P., Van Vaerenbergh, T., Verhaeghe, S., Van Hecke, A., & Fonteyne, V. (2020). Health-related quality of life overview after different curative treatment options in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: an umbrella review. Quality of life research : an international journal of quality of life aspects of treatment, care and rehabilitation, 29(11), 2887–2910. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-020-02544-z
- Van Acker, J., Pauwels, N. S., Cauwels, R., & Rajasekharan, S. (2020). Outcomes of different radioprotective precautions in children undergoing dental radiography: a systematic review. European archives of paediatric dentistry : official journal of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry, 21(4), 463–508. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40368-020-00544-8
- De Tobel, J., Bauwens, J., Parmentier, G., Franco, A., Pauwels, N. S., Verstraete, K. L., & Thevissen, P. W. (2020). Magnetic resonance imaging for forensic age estimation in living children and young adults: a systematic review. Pediatric radiology, 50(12), 1691–1708. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00247-020-04709-x
- Van der Looven, R., Le Roy, L., Tanghe, E., Samijn, B., Roets, E., Pauwels, N., Deschepper, E., De Muynck, M., Vingerhoets, G., & Van den Broeck, C. (2020). Risk factors for neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Developmental medicine and child neurology, 62(6), 673–683. https://doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.14381
- Van der Looven, R., Le Roy, L., Pauwels, N., & Vingerhoets, G. (2020). Critical appraisal tools and rater training in systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Developmental medicine and child neurology, 62(6), 764. https://doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.14538

Koobasi-Explore tools and automation for supporting systematic review and guideline processes-1115_a.pdf

Koobasi-Explore tools and automation for supporting systematic review and guideline processes-1115_b.pdf


ID: 1190 / O 2.3: 3
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Have a go at completing a search summary table

Alison Bethel, Naomi Shaw

University of Exeter, United Kingdom

 


ID: 1173 / O 2.3: 4
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Live searching with Wichor Bramer

Wichor Bramer, Elise Krabbendam, Sabrina Gunput, Maarten Engel

Erasmus MC, Netherlands, The

Biography and Bibliography
Wichor Bramer is medical information specialist at Erasmus MC in Rotterdam. He has developed a method that helps him create searches for systematic reviews much faster than other information specialists. He successfully defended his PhD thesis on this topic in October 2019.

Bramer-Live searching with Wichor Bramer-1173_a.pdf
 


ID: 1166 / O 2.3: 5
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Education

Open Educational Resources in the spotlight

Irma van Houts1, Sietske Vergeer2

1HAN, Netherlands, The; 2HAN, Netherlands, The


van Houts-Open Educational Resources in the spotlight-1166_a.pdf
 


ID: 1167 / O 2.3: 6
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Education

Shopping in PubMed

Irma van Houts1, Sietske Vergeer2

1HAN, Netherlands, The; 2HAN, Netherlands, The

Biography and Bibliography
1. https://www.bmi-online.nl/bmi-bijscholing-irma-van-houts-ip-2018-09/
2. PubMed vernieuwd. In: IP vakblad voor informatieprofessionals, 2020/03
 


ID: 1234 / O 2.3: 9
Interactive Workshop
Topics: Resources and metrics

The benefits of a well-managed Current Research Information System (CRIS) and the role the library can play within an academic hospital

Robin F. Ottjes, Peter G. Braun

Central Medical Library, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands

Biography and Bibliography
Robin and Peter are both Medical Information Specialists at the Central Medical Library of the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG). Next to education support and systematic reviews, they both support research in the UMCG by providing support for a wide selection of topics, such as: Open Access, repository help, research impact & assessment, profiles and identifiers and reference management.

Ottjes-The benefits of a well-managed Current Research Information System-1234_a.pptx

Ottjes-The benefits of a well-managed Current Research Information System-1234_b.docx
 
2:00pm - 2:30pmO 3.1: Online Discussion Everything Interesting
Session Chair: Gussun Gunes

The abstracts will not be presented live during this session. You can are advised to view the recorded presentations before this session. Presenters will briefly introduce themselves and then discuss their research, and answers questions.

 
ID: 219 / O 3.1: 1
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

Strengthening NHS knowledge and library services in England: fashioning levers for change

Sue Lacey Bryant

Health Education England, United Kingdom

Introduction

A ‘lever of change’ can be understood as a device or action that leaders can use to drive change, for instance to engage with and motivate organisations and individuals to do things differently.

When Health Education England (HEE) approved Knowledge for Healthcare, a framework for the development of National Health Service library and knowledge services in England 2015-2020, the national team recognised that two significant levers for change were already in place. Nationally the Health and Social care Act 2012 laid a duty upon the NHS to use evidence from research. Locally an individual Learning Agreement between HEE and each trust providing placements for trainees, set out responsibilities in relation to provision of library services.

Knowledge for Healthcare sets out an ambitious vision, calling for a wide-ranging change programme. In progressing the implementation of the strategy, we began to think consciously about ways in which we might influence change. This paper summarises the levers now in place as we implement the next phase of Knowledge for Healthcare 2021-2026. It reflects on some of the human factors of change as well as how we have capitalised on system drivers.

Aim

With the goal of extending, optimising and sustaining health knowledge and library service provision, the team has worked to ‘install’ a series of different types of lever. Working with colleagues in HEE and in partner organisations to build trust and ensure alignment with respective priorities has been crucial.

Program Description

There are important system drivers, including legislation and national NHS strategy and plans, on which health librarians in England can draw. To complement these the team has also put in place several different types of lever on which health library managers, stakeholders and the national team can pull to advance improvements in NHS knowledge and library services:

  • Strategy
  • Contract requirements
  • Standards
  • Policies
  • Health economics analysis
  • Workforce development
  • Funding
  • Incentives, funded innovations

Application of these levers is supported by advocacy, recruiting influential champions and telling the story of the positive impact of health knowledge services.

Evaluation

These levers were not developed to be operated as single ‘silver bullets’ to vanquish the different types of challenges that library services may face in times of austerity. Nevertheless, vignettes are helpful as a means to illustrate how levers, such as HEE’s policies and research outputs, have been impactful

The team has developed an explicit Evaluation Framework by which to assess the impact of the Knowledge for Healthcare strategy over time.

Conclusion

A strategic approach to driving change, fashioning new levers, has led to the development of a 'toolkit' that leaders can use to strengthen the positioning and sustainability of health library services. Levers for change work well in combination, together generating a climate conducive to positive change.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Referencing the NHS Change Model, this paper highlights that while system drivers, and monitoring compliance with requirements and standards are critically important, the human touch expressed through leadership, engagement and narrative is vital to attract the commitment needed to deliver and sustain change.

Biography and Bibliography
Biography
Sue Lacey Bryant BA Hons. Dip Lib. MSc. FCLIP.
National Lead for NHS Knowledge and Library Services, Health Education England.

Sue is passionate about bringing knowledge to bear on decision-making, and extending the reach and impact of high-quality health knowledge and library services. Sue leads the development and implementation of HEE’s Knowledge for Healthcare strategy, heading up a top national team that provides professional leadership, advice and expertise working with NHS organisations, and with health knowledge and library teams across England.

Sue has extensive experience of shaping innovative roles in Knowledge Management, predominantly in primary care, becoming Chief Knowledge Officer for a Primary Care Trust; and later Director of a Clinical Commissioning Group.
Sue received the CILIP Knowledge and Information Management Walford Award in 2018 for making an outstanding contribution to knowledge management.


Recent publications
Lacey Bryant, S. and Poole, N. Delivering innovation and supporting healthcare through a crisis. Information Professional, June 2021. 20-23
https://www.cilip.org.uk/news/news.asp?id=572731

Lacey Bryant, S. NHS knowledge specialists have never been more vital. Health Service Journal, 18 June 2021
https://www.hsj.co.uk/service-design/nhs-knowledge-specialists-have-never-been-more-vital/7030334.article?utm

Lacey Bryant, S. “Two years on from Topol: Preparing ourselves for the Digital future”.
Knowledge for Healthcare blog, May 10 2021.
https://kfh.libraryservices.nhs.uk/two-years-on-from-topol-preparing-ourselves-for-the-digital-future/

Lacey Bryant, S. Six Hot Picks. Library Life, April 2021, 26-27.
https://www.librariesaotearoa.org.nz/uploads/2/4/6/4/24640423/library_life_464_april_2021.pdf

Stewart, D., et al.. Introduction: Good practice in NHS-funded library and knowledge services. Library and Information Research. 2020; 43(127): 1-5. Available from: https://doi.org/10.29173/lirg822

Lacey Bryant S. and Stewart. D. “Knowledge for Healthcare: reviewing progress on workforce development”. Information Professional. August – September 2020, 38-41

Lacey Bryant S. and Stewart. D. “Knowledge for Healthcare: developing an appropriately skilled library and knowledge services workforce”. Information Professional. June – July 2020. 38-41 https://content.yudu.com/libraryHtml/A44084/InformationProfessio/reader.html?refid=1037274&refUrl=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.cilip.org.uk%252Fpage%252FIP_Archive_2020&page=4

Stewart, D and Lacey Bryant, S. “Knowledge for Healthcare: taking an integrated approach to workforce planning and development”. Information Professional. April-May 2020. 34-37
https://content.yudu.com/libraryHtml/A43xfb/InformationProfessio/reader.html?refid=1037274&refUrl=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.cilip.org.uk%252Fpage%252FIP_Archive_2020

Lacey Bryant-Strengthening NHS knowledge and library services in England-219_a.pptx

Lacey Bryant-Strengthening NHS knowledge and library services in England-219_b.pptx
 


ID: 159 / O 3.1: 2
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

A study of the information needs and lived experiences of Covid-19 recovered patients

Alireza Yavar1, Fatemeh Sheikhshoaei1, Zahra Batooli2, Sara Ahmadizadeh1

1Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, Islamic Republic of; 2Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, Islamic Republic of

Introduction

The Covid19 pandemic has infected millions of people since its outbreak in December 2019, killing more than five million people worldwide. Both infected and healthy people feel the need to have essential and practical information about this pandemic. The experiences of people who have been infected and recovered from the disease can be a suitable and reliable source of information.

Aim

This study aimed to explain the information needs and lived experiences of improved Covid-19 patients.

Method/ Program Description
This study was conducted with a qualitative approach and phenomenological method. The study population included recovered patients from Covid19 who had a history of admission in medical centers. Sampling consisted of 24 people (16 males and 8 females) which were performed purposefully until saturation. Data were collected through a semi-structured interview and data analysis was performed using Dickelmann's seven-step method. Then the data were categorized into themes by analyzing and coding.
Results/ Evaluation
Based on coding the interviews, 14 main themes and 41 sub-themes were identified for the study aims (the information needs of improved patients and the lived experiences of recovered patients). The main topics of the first aim included knowledge about the symptoms, types of disease tests, lockdown, treatment, nutrition, progression of the disease during infection, communication, psychological health, following the protocols after recovery, valid information media, and access to information. The main themes of the second aim included the patient's physical symptoms during the illness, psychological pressures, prevention measures, symptoms of the disease after recovery.
Conclusion

According to the study's findings, the prevalence of COVID-19 affects the individual, family, social relationships, and lived experiences of recovered Covid-19 people. Since this research is based on fact, it can be concluded that the prevalence of Covid-19 disease can change people's experiences and the need to produce information content related to diseases for similar patients and people in the community. Therefore, the necessary measures must be taken in this regard.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Keywords: COVID 19, Information needs, Lived experience, Phenomenology, recovered patients

Biography and Bibliography
Fatemeh Sheikhshoaei is an assistant professor in the medical library and information science department at the Tehran University of Medical Sciences. She received her Ph.D. in information science and knowledge studies from the Faculty of Management at the University of Tehran. Her research focuses on clinical librarian, digital libraries, information technology applications in libraries, and traditional and online peer review processes in scientific journals. Her research has been published in journals including Library and Information Science Research, Journal of the Medical Library Association, Electronic Library, Webology, Library Philosophy and Practice, Journal of Scholarly Publishing, Iranian Journal of Information Processing Management.

Yavar-A study of the information needs and lived experiences of Covid-19 recovered patients-159_a.pptx
   


ID: 180 / O 3.1: 3
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

How to Find the Evidence During a Public Health Emergency: An Expert-Developed Best Practices Statement on Finding the Most Relevant Evidence During a Public Health Emergency

Mark Henirch Mueller1, Stacy Brody2, Nicole Askin3

1Saskatchewan Health Authority; 2George Washington University; 3University of Manitoba

Introduction

Informationists conducting searches and supporting evidence synthesists during the COVID-19 pandemic faced many challenges, including an overabundance of information of varying quality; the rapid evolution of evidence; the proliferation of new databases and literature collections. These and many other issues prompted leaders of a volunteer-based professional organization to convene an international expert panel to develop best practices for searching in public health emergencies.

Aim

To develop a broad, living document of best practices for evidence searching during public health emergencies. The statement will offer fluidity and flexibility to accommodate the rapid changes of emergency information landscapes and will lay the foundation needed to address challenges encountered in future public health emergencies.

Methods

Project leads identified 12 informationists and 18 medical, health and public health experts by affiliation with evidence synthesis groups; COVID-19 search experience; and nomination. Project leads developed six core elements of the statement from the professional literature and professional experiences. An online survey of the panel established consensus on the core elements. Panel members responded to guiding questions on the agreed-upon elements and attended a series of virtual focus groups to address outstanding questions and areas of disagreement for each element.

Results

Twelve information professionals contributed to best practice recommendations on six core elements: (1) Core Resources; (2) Search Strategies; (3) Publication Types; (4) Transparency and Reproducibility; (5) Collaboration; and (6) Conducting Research. The underlying principles for these recommendations include timeliness, openness, balance, preparedness, and responsiveness.

Conclusions

The authors and experts anticipate that the recommendations outlined in this statement will aid informationists, librarians, researchers and decision-makers in their responses to the current and future public health emergencies. These recommendations complement existing guidance, including the Methodological Expectations of Cochrane Intervention Reviews (MECIR) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA-S) guidelines; and address concerns faced by professionals in the current context. This statement is a living document and will be reviewed at the end of the pandemic and following the next global health emergency. Future iterations should solicit input from a broader community and reflect conclusions drawn from meta-research on the pandemic and other health emergencies. Future iterations will take into consideration evolving technologies, professional norms and other opportunities; however, the underlying principles should remain constant.

Human Touch

On a human level, the authors and expert panel felt at a loss as to how to effectively search for evidence in this chaotic information landscape. As a group, we needed to share our experiences with other professionals responding to the pandemic and to create some sense and meaning out of the work that we were doing. This best practice statement is professionals responding to the pandemic seeking ways to find order in this chaotic information landscape.

Biography and Bibliography
Mark Mueller, MLIS, is a Clinical services librarian at the Saskatchewan Health Authority.

Stacy Brody, MI, is a reference and instruction librarian at the Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, in Washington, DC. She is also one of the co-founders of the Librarian Reserve Corps.

Nicole Askin, MLIS, is a Liaison Librarian with the Outreach Services unit at the University of Manitoba Libraries.

Mueller-How to Find the Evidence During a Public Health Emergency-180_a.mp4

Mueller-How to Find the Evidence During a Public Health Emergency-180_b.pptx
 


ID: 1132 / O 3.1: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

Position Descriptions for Leaders in Health Sciences Libraries, Medicine, Nursing, and Health Administration: Exploring Leadership Competencies as Reflected in Practice

Nicole Capdarest-Arest1, Jamie M. Gray2

1University of California, Davis, United States of America; 2Weill Cornell Medicine - Qatar

Introduction
Building effective interprofessional relationships is now a requirement of the modern health sciences library leader. Demonstrating leadership competencies recognized in health sciences librarianship as well as in adjacent professions positions library leaders to better connect the role of the library and forge future-looking partnerships. A position description (“PD”) defines employee areas of responsibility and requirements and, ideally, should reflect current standards of practice. As such, PDs are often a means through which professional standards are linked to operational practice. As standards of leadership are increasingly being integrated into competencies for health sciences professions (including health sciences librarianship), evaluating which competencies are being reflected in PDs should provide insight into how such requirements are being put into practice in the real world.
Aim
This presentation describes how PDs for health sciences library leaders and those in medicine, nursing, and healthcare administration align in relationship to identified standards, as reflected in the multidisciplinary Healthcare Leadership Alliance (HLA) competency framework.
Method/ Program Description
Twenty PDs (5 each in the areas of leadership/management in health sciences librarianship, healthcare administration, medicine, and nursing) were obtained by searching The Chronicle of Higher Education Jobs and HigherEdJobs web portals in October - November 2021. An additional review of the MLA career page was conducted to complete the set of library postings. Five PDs mentioning leadership or management were selected randomly in each profession, and then each PD was analyzed for keyword congruence with the HLA competency framework using all 43 predefined keywords.
Results/ Evaluation
Preliminary results show that across all PDs evaluated, the top 5 most commonly addressed HLA keywords were: leadership, nursing, staff, management, and community. HLA keywords that were not mentioned at all across all four professions were: reimbursement, self awareness, and theory. In health sciences librarianship PDs evaluated, the most frequently used HLA keywords were: diversity, staff, information systems, and technology. Results indicate that PDs reflect alignment with many competencies for leadership in health-related professions, including health sciences librarianship, with an average of 32.25 of 43 HLA leadership competencies. Hospital administration position descriptions on average addressed the most HLA keywords (n=36), followed by medicine (n=34), nursing (n=31) and health sciences librarianship (n=28). More results will be evaluated and discussed at the EAHIL 2022 conference.
Conclusion

This lesser congruence with HLA keyword representation in the set of PDs for health sciences librarianship might present an opportunity to consider and include leadership competencies that resonate more with health professions colleagues that we intersect with daily in PDs for librarian roles. For health sciences librarians in leadership positions, or for any health sciences librarians working with interprofessional leaders, emphasizing and practicing cross-disciplinary leadership skills could demonstrate alignment and shared values across the professions. Many of the HLA keywords reflect skills that can be readily acquired by health sciences librarians via continuing education and participation in conferences (such as EAHIL) that provide learning opportunities around these skills.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Incorporating language and skills from adjacent health-oriented professions can be beneficial to librarians to better connect with colleagues in these fields.

Biography and Bibliography
Nicole Capdarest-Arest, MA(LIS), AHIP, as Head of the Blaisdell Medical Library at UC Davis, spearheads biomedical library initiatives and partners on research, education and clinical care with faculty, staff and students in the UC Davis School of Medicine, Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, Clinical and Translational Science Center, UC Davis Health, and the affiliated research centers and institutes. Her special areas of focus include leadership, design thinking, program development, instructional design, and optimizing quality information retrieval processes.

Jamie M. Gray, MLS, MS, AHIP is the Director of the Distributed eLibrary at Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar. Previously, she served as part of the library leadership team at both Stanford School of Medicine’s Lane Medical Library and the University of Washington Health Sciences Library. Her professional interests are varied and include inter-professional leadership, evidence-based practice, and the library’s role in helping to address the social determinants of health.

Jamie and Nicole have presented previously to EAHIL and other conferences on leadership in health sciences librarianship. They have also published on this topic: Capdarest-Arest, N., & Gray, J. M. (2020). Health sciences library leadership skills in an interprofessional landscape: a review and textual analysis. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA, 108(4), 547.

Capdarest-Arest-Position Descriptions for Leaders in Health Sciences Libraries, Medicine, Nursing, and Health_a.pdf
   


ID: 107 / O 3.1: 5
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

The London, Kent, Surrey, Sussex Regional Searching Guidance

Adam Tocock

Barts Health, United Kingdom

Introduction
With significant variation in practice reported across NHS Knowledge and Library Services when performing mediated evidence searches for healthcare staff, Health Education England (HEE) sought to address disparities and ensure uniformity and quality of service, by creating guidance for healthcare library staff to follow when performing mediated evidence searches on end-users' (healthcare staff's) behalf.
Aim

To report how a working group of NHS and non-NHS librarians from London, Kent, Surrey, and Sussex created guidance for librarians performing mediated evidence searches. This will include a history of the guide's composition and explanation for the decisions made behind its organisation.
Method/ Program Description
The 2nd edition of the guidance available at will be showcased after notes on its creation with a slideshow focusing on the structure of the guidance, and some key entries that demonstrate how a user would follow it when first approaching it for help with a search.
Results/ Evaluation
The impact and usage of the guidance will be reported, with feedback from users highlighted, and plans for the 3rd edition will be announced. Alot has changed in the healthcare information searching area since the 2nd edition's publication and here we will explain how the guidence's next edition will reflect these changes and help users in the new landscape.
Conclusion

Delegates will be encouraged to try using the guidance, to share their experience, and share ther ideas for how it could be improved.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Users of the guidance have been the focus of this project, and every facet of its construction was designed to encourage and reassure users as they search. A truly collaborative piece of work that has reached far beyond its regional bounds, it is hoped that by showcasing the 2nd edition of the guidance and building further relationships, we can continue to improve it and help our colleagues.

Biography and Bibliography
The guidance is freely available at:
https://sites.google.com/site/healthliteraturesearchers/Home/search-guidance

Tocock-The London, Kent, Surrey, Sussex Regional Searching Guidance-107_a.mp4

Tocock-The London, Kent, Surrey, Sussex Regional Searching Guidance-107_b.docx
 


ID: 1124 / O 3.1: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Everything interesting

Unexpected readings: looking for beauty in books at the Hospice of Padua (Italy).

Giuliana Prevedello, Marianna Gnoato, Valentina Bozzato

Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padua, Italy

Introduction

Books can contribute to the well-being of a person: they have a therapeutic potential and a positive effect, limiting the sense of isolation that patients and the healthcare staff may feel during hospitalization, and nurturing a sense of connection, empathy and being in the present. The Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV-IRCCS) is the first and only Institute in the Veneto region (Italy) specifically dedicated to cancer research and the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The Institute has offices, laboratories and hospitals located in three different cities in the region; in the latter, the new Hospice was inaugurated in 2020: a structure with six bedrooms that welcomes patients in an advanced stage of oncological disease.

Aim

With the purpose of improving the quality of life and making the Hospice a more reassuring and less impersonal place, the IOV scientific library has designed a pilot project called “Letture inattese” (Unexpected readings) that brings novels, short stories, poetry, graphic novels and illustrated books to guests, carers and the health workforce of the Hospice.

Method

People that wish to participate do not choose a book, but a topic of interest between the themes that we have developed, and receive a closed fabric bag with 5 unexpected books. The themes that people can choose from are: The stars, the universe and everything else; Chlorophyll and oxygen: animals and plants; Coloured and black and white images; Intertwining: stories and adventurous encounters; Back and forth: wandering the world.

By delivering the books in closed bags, we act in compliance with the anti Covid-19 regulations (once returned and before being loaned to patients, all books will be isolated and subjected to the quarantine procedure, according to official guidelines) and we offer a moment of surprise that breaks with the Hospice everyday routine.

Results
The books that conform this first patients’ library (about 50 titles for each theme) were selected by the IOV librarians in collaboration with Hospice staff, local booksellers and friends, based on these criteria: long readings and heavy books were excluded as well as all material regarding oncology or health related issues; we chose easy to hold and leaf through books and adventurous stories to read. A small collection of illustrated books for children that visit their loved ones was also included.
Conclusion

This project lays the foundations for the creation of a network that connects the hospital and the cultural veneto community: through this project we have launched a collaboration with two independent bookstores in the region and we envision new connections growing from the seeds of this first patients’ library at IOV.

Human Touch

With the people in mind, rather than their illness, our way of approaching the project aimed at the creation of a moment of wonderment, relief and leise through the beauty that can be found in books. This new library creates opportunities for deepening the quality of human relationships between the patients, their families and healthcare professionals via a humanistic perspective on palliative care.

Biography and Bibliography
The scientific library at IOV is dedicated to the management of scientific documentation, access to databases and promotion of publications in specialized journals, as well as supporting the researchers in their studies and the pubblication process of their scientific results. We are a multidisciplinary team with different backgrounds, in science, communication and art history. Our personal approach to the scientific library encompasses the humanistic side of healthcare.
Recent pubblication:
https://doi.org/10.4081/itjm.2021.1473

Prevedello-Unexpected readings-1124_a.mp4
   
 
2:30pm - 3:30pmO 3.2: Online Discussion Plenary Speakers and Panelists
Session Chair: Hans Ket

The live plenary speakers sessions will have been recorded during EAHIL 2022. You are advised to view the recorded presentations before this session. Each plenary speaker will introduce themselves and their research for 10 minutes, after which the floor is open for discussion and questions.

 
ID: 2245 / O 3.2: 1
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

NLM update

Dianne Babski

National Library of Medicine, United States of America

Since its founding in 1836, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has played a pivotal role in translating biomedical research into practice and been a leader in information innovation. As one of the 27 institutes and centers at the National Institutes of Health, NLM advances research in biomedical informatics and data science and is the world’s largest medical library.
Millions of scientists, health and information professionals, and the public use NLM services every day. Dianne Babski, Associate Director for Library Operations, will present an update that highlights available resources from the NLM.


Babski-NLM update-2245_a.pptx

Babski-NLM update-2245_b.pdf
 


ID: 2241 / O 3.2: 2
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

Into the User Environment 2022!

Guus van den Brekel

University Medical Center Groningen, Netherlands, The

« Into the User Environment Now!» was the title of my first plenary presentation at an EAHIL conference.

It pictured how -back in 2006- how users and the information landscape changed rapidly, and what we needed to do about it as medical libraries, to keep up the pace, to not loose the connection with the user.

Technologies to embrace, actions to take…

This update pictures where things went right, wrong or very different! And it discusses where we are now in 2022, with a peek into possible futures, from the perspective of a medical library in a Dutch academic hospital, facilitating patient care, education ánd research support.

Biography and Bibliography
Guus van den Brekel is medical information specialist at the Central Medical Library of the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG), in north of the Netherlands. His work includes developing, maintaining of library services and tools for staff and students, as well as innovation. As such he is also the ‘go-between’ for the IT-departments regarding library systems and services. Research Impact and Support is his major focus currently. He is coordinator for the UMCG’s current research information system (PURE). In general, he is always on the lookout for tools & services that make the workflow of hospital staff, researchers, teachers and students easier and more efficient.

van den Brekel-Into the User Environment 2022!-2241_a.pptx

van den Brekel-Into the User Environment 2022!-2241_b.mp4
 


ID: 2242 / O 3.2: 3
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Researching Ourselves: A Critical Role for Librarians

Melissa L. Rethlefsen

University of New Mexico Health Sciences Library & Informatics Center, United States of America

Conducting research is a critical aspect of our work as librarians, so that we can understand what works, what doesn't, and why. It can also help us demonstrate our value to others outside our profession by providing evidence of how what we do improves health, education, and research outcomes. Starting in research can be a challenge, but it starts with identifying questions that should be answered. Using the story of how I got involved in (and continue to do) research, we'll talk about the process of research and the benefits it can offer to one's career, library, and the profession.

Biography and Bibliography
Melissa Rethlefsen is the Executive Director of the Health Sciences Library & Informatics Center at the University of New Mexico, a position she began in January 2021. Prior to her current position, she was the Associate Dean, George A. Smathers Libraries, and Fackler Director, Health Science Center Libraries, at the University of Florida. She has also worked at the University of Utah, Mayo Clinic, Minnesota Department of Health, and the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on the role of librarians in improving research integrity, particularly in the reproducibility of systematic review searches.

Rethlefsen-Researching Ourselves-2242_a.pptx

Rethlefsen-Researching Ourselves-2242_b.pdf
 


ID: 2243 / O 3.2: 4
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Data

Scientific misconduct in the medical and health sciences and means to avoid it (at least partially)

Jasmin Schmitz

ZB MED - Information Centre for Life Sciences, Germany

Scientific misconduct and good scientific practices/research integrity are two sides of the same coin. Especially in the medical and health sciences misconduct can cause severe damage. Therefore, if errors are spotted publications should be corrected or retracted.

Scientific misconduct can either be performed deliberately or by mistake or rather lack of knowledge.

Besides a general introduction to the topic, the talk will also give an overview on practices and tools that can help to reduce at least such forms of misconduct that happened unintentionally.

Biography and Bibliography
Jasmin Schmitz received a PhD in information science. She worked as a freelance trainer for a commercial provider for scientific information and as scientific project coordinator in the field of bibliometrics. At ZB MED she is responsible for the publication advisory services.

Schmitz-Scientific misconduct in the medical and health sciences and means-2243_a.pptx

Schmitz-Scientific misconduct in the medical and health sciences and means-2243_b.pptx

Schmitz-Scientific misconduct in the medical and health sciences and means-2243_c.pdf


ID: 2246 / O 3.2: 5
Plenary Presentation
Topics: Information retrieval and evidence syntheses

The Future of Systematic Reviews - Paneldiscussion

Louise Farragher1, Wichor Bramer2, Maria-Inti Metzendorf3, Melissa Rethlefsen4, Jos Kleijnen5

1Health Research Board, Ireland; 2Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 3University Düsseldorf, Germany; 4University of New Mexico, United States of America; 5Kleijnen Systematic Reviews, York, United Kingdom

Panel discussion on the future of systematic reviews.

Topics include:

  1. Quality and searching standards
  2. Current and future workforce capacity and training
  3. AI and systematic reviews
  4. Sharing data from SRs – how can we facilitate this?
  5. Where are we going with SRs?
    Rapid reviews, living systematic reviews, Reviews of Reviews
  6. Staying current

Farragher-The Future of Systematic Reviews-2246_a.pptx
   
 
3:30pm - 4:00pmLive Closure Online Conference
Session Chair: Wichor Bramer
Session Chair: Hans Ket

The chairs will close the session and you are invited to EAHIL 2023 in Trondheim.


 
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