Conference Agenda

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Session Overview
Session
O 1.3: Online Discussion Professionals Connected
Time:
Thursday, 09/June/2022:
3:00pm - 3:30pm

Session Chair: Wichor Bramer

The abstracts will not be presented live during this session. You can are advised to view the recorded presentations before this session. Presenters will briefly introduce themselves and then discuss their research, and answers questions.


Session Abstract

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Presentations
ID: 121 / O 1.3: 1
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Human touch in animal health: how to benefit the resources of scientific literature with professionals connected

Raisa Iivonen1, Rosa Venäläinen2, Gunilla Widén1

1Åbo Akademi University; 2University of Helsinki

Introduction

Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) is defined as “the use of best relevant evidence in conjunction with clinical expertise to make best possible decision about a veterinary patient. The circumstances of each patient, and the circumstances and values of the owner/ carer, must also be considered when making an evidence-based decision”. Successful decision making based on high quality evidence is required in contemporary clinical practice. The workload may be heavy, the customers are demanding but the clinician has to obey the law. Sometimes the situations demand immediate decision making – based on evidence – to avoid worse consequences.

The findability of the reliable information is crucial; therefore, it is important to support the information seeking process by refining the search tools.

Aim

Better findability needs better search tools – e.g., deep indexing, high quality-controlled vocabulary and usable interfaces. Comparing the index terms in two abstracting services aims to reveal the differences between indexers, the vocabularies they use and the depth of the understanding of the subject. Since there is no veterinary specialist involved, indexers have to rely on the vocabularies available.

Method

Testing the working of scientific terminology in everyday practice of veterinarians in our country is done by comparing the index terms used in 17 peer-revied articles in our national professional journal. These articles were published between 2016-2019 and are chosen from 50 articles to represent the majority of topics a small animal practitioner experiences during the daily practice. They were indexed in two databases, one national and the other international.

Results

The expected results show differences in the viewpoints of the database producers as well the resources the indexing services have. E.g., the size of the vocabularies – thesaurus, ontology – has differences due to the history of service producers. Another study object is to compare the time differences between publishing and indexing. As the peer reviewing process of an article may take some months, it is important to provide the access to it as soon as possible.

Conclusion

Solutions to the findability problems require well established co-operation among professionals as well tools and infrastructures available to the end-users.

From the ontologising point of view, the content description with exact terms in very special areas is crucial. Deep understanding of the discipline indexed, as well as solid semantical basis of the vocabulary served, guarantee a reliable search procedure.

A collaboration project is needed to connect the professionals in the fields of veterinary sciences and practices, terminologists, indexers, and end-users.

Human Touch (Recommended)

Human touch in animal health: how to benefit the resources of scientific literature with professionals connected

Biography and Bibliography
Raisa Iivonen is a Ph.D. student in the Åbo Akademy University. She is interested in semantic web and ontologies from the veterinary point of view.

Iivonen, R., Venäläinen, R. & Widén, G. Findability of Evidence - The Cornerstone of Successful Practice. Case Finnish Veterinary Medical Terminology Ontologized. In: EAHIL 2021 Virtual Workshop Proceedings Abstract Book, 5th - 8th of July 2021, İstanbul / edited by Güssün Güneş. İstanbul : Marmara University, 2021. (Marmara University Publications) p. 107-108.

Iivonen-Human touch in animal health-121_a.pdf

Iivonen-Human touch in animal health-121_b.pdf

Iivonen-Human touch in animal health-121_c.pdf


ID: 1155 / O 1.3: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Collaboration between the librarian and researchers

Eli Harriss1, Sabine Klein2

1University of Oxford, United Kingdom; 2University of Zurich, Switzerland

Introduction

We want to discuss the holistic, ‘total’ nature of what can happen when a librarian works with researchers to collaborate on a project such a systematic review. We use the ‘total’ model to consider the breadth of skills required by library staff: project management; people management; time management; communication; teaching; and information literacy. We describe the practical steps that we can take when conducting the reference interview and an algorithm that we can use, the mentoring aspect involved in these relationships, and the “invisible work” (with reference to Ross-White, 2021) and emotional labour put in by library staff (with reference to Constantin, 1840 and Emmelhainz et al, 2017) to ensure that projects are successful, methodologies are rigorous, robust, and transparent, and that all communication is positive to maintain future collaboration.
Aim

Two case studies are presented to compare the practical steps we take when a librarian approaches a research group, or when researchers approach the librarian to request their involvement in a project such as a systematic, scoping, or realist review; the pastoral care and mentoring aspects involved in managing the information science aspects of a review project; the emotional labour and the behavioural aspects of meetings with students and researchers for 1-1s to discuss research projects.
Method/ Program Description

Case studies from Medical Librarians based at the University of Oxford and the University of Zurich are used as the research method for this presentation.
Results/ Evaluation

We present an algorithm of steps to follow in the reference interview, and describe the mentoring skills and the emotional labour involved in two cases.

Conclusion

These case studies reveal that, in line with the literature, the practical steps involved in the reference interview, the mentoring and pastoral care of students and researchers, and the emotional labour are not unique to the work of Medical Librarians, setting our work in the broader context of librarianship, and raising awareness of these issues both for further training and for professional welfare. We also encourage our fellow librarians to discuss more about how to deal with demanding researchers and how to set boundaries in a professional way.

References

Constantin, L. A. Bibliothekonomie : oder Lehre von der Anordnung, Bewahrung und Verwaltung der Bibliotheken. Leipzig: N.p., 1840.

Emmelhainz, C., Pappas, E. & Seale, M. 2017. Behavioral expectations for the mommy librarian: the successful reference transaction as emotional labor, Sacramento, CA, Library Juice Press.

Ross-White, A. 2021. Search is a verb: systematic review searching as invisible labor. J Med Libr Assoc, 109, 505-506.

Human Touch (Recommended)

This paper is very much focussing on the human touch involved when Librarians collaborate with Researchers, discussing the emotional labour and the interpersonal skills required for this work.

Biography and Bibliography
Eli Harriss has worked as an Outreach Librarian and Library Manager for thirteen years and is now the Outreach and Enquiry Services Manager for the Bodleian Health Care Libraries at the University of Oxford (UK).

Sabine Klein is a former medical subject librarian and newly appointed product manager at the Zurich University Library. She strives to improve products and customer services.

Harriss-Collaboration between the librarian and researchers-1155_a.pptx
   


ID: 149 / O 1.3: 3
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Reflections on a successful collaboration between information specialists in a low contextual setting: an exploration of the roles of information specialists in systematic review

Jenni Washington1, Lydia Jones2

1Health Technology Wales, United Kingdom; 2Department of Medical Consultancy, Federal Joint Committee (G-BA), Germany

Introduction

Information specialists and review teams seem to have an unspoken understanding of the literature search process. In this presentation, two information specialists working in Health Technology Assessment reflect on their roles as information specialists in a successful project-based international collaboration on a systematic review. The low contextual setting in which the collaboration between two information specialists with heterogenous daily practice and no previous contact presents an opportunity to examine this understanding of the literature search process brought by each of the information specialists. How and why are they similar? How and why are they different? How can we make shared understanding more explicit or resolve discrepancies?

Aim

To gain a deeper understanding of how models of the literature search process might affect collaborations in a low contextual setting and to offer insights gleaned from experience.

Method

We undertook an observational exploratory case study by examining our correspondence, meeting notes and annotated drafts of project deliverables, as well as using our personal recollections. We analysed the data descriptively using models of the literature search process described in previous research as a framework.

Results

We describe the points at which our implicit understanding strongly agreed or deviated and the effects these had on our collaboration, as well as the larger project. We share potential strategies for making literature searching models more explicit, leveraging agreement to benefit the collaboration and the project, as well as to resolve discrepancies. Furthermore, we explore possible connections between project outcomes and the degree to which our implicit literature searching models, and those of the larger review team, were in agreement.

Conclusion

When conducting a collaborative project in a low contextual setting, it is important to think about the following:

  • Make literature searching models explicit – we did this by privately talking through the “what” and “who” of the whole project, then proposing the resulting process to the larger review group. We relied on our experience and consulted relevant guidelines, but using relevant guidelines as a starting point could also be a useful approach.
  • Communication – what will be the primary method of communication? We recommend email, as it serves as a record of the communication. Save telephone / video conversations for things which require discussion, but minute what is decided.
  • Technology – You need to get creative when faced with issues, especially technological challenges. Ensure that you establish which technology is essential to the progression of the project and make sure that everyone has the required software/version of software.

We recommend that information specialists in a similar situation take time for side-discussions to ensure successful collaboration.

Human Touch

The collaboration and relationship that was built between two information specialists from different countries was a happy by-product of the project. We are now in a position where we could contact the other person for advice on any information specialist topic and their opinion would be fully respected. In fact, working on this project has led to a number of other pieces of work where we have collaborated.

Biography and Bibliography
Jenni Washington has over 20 years’ experience as an Information Scientist. She currently works as an Information Specialist for Health Technology Wales and previously as an Information Officer for SIGN (Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network).

Lydia Jones currently works as an Information Specialist supporting evidence-based decision making at the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA). She previously did similar work in the fields of Scholarly Edition and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).

Washington-Reflections on a successful collaboration between information specialists-149_a.mp4

Washington-Reflections on a successful collaboration between information specialists-149_b.pdf
 


ID: 224 / O 1.3: 4
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Lifting the lamp from under the bushel: Showcasing the work of midwifery students

Sinéad Keogh, Liz Dore

University of Limerick, Ireland

Introduction
As part of the midwifery training run by the Midwifery Practice Development Unit (MPDU) in University of Limerick, students must spend time on placement in both maternity settings and specialist areas such as surgical and mental health settings. Following this residency, the students are asked to create a reflective piece about their experience. These ‘learning logs’ were collected from students through the years and revealed truly beautiful and thoughtful insights into the midwifery students themselves, and the patients they encountered. Wanting to expose these works to a wider audience, but not having the skills needed, the MPDU staff approached the library to ask for help in creating an online exhibition. Having some experience in this area already, the library was happy to support our colleagues with this innovative project.

Aim
To create an online exhibition of the midwifery students' reflective practice pieces.

Method
The staff of the MPDU who oversaw the student placements, selected, digitised and collated the learning logs for inclusion in an exhibition. They also gained permission from the students to use their work. The library staff worked with the MPDU to create an online exhibition using Wordpress, with regular meetings to offer advice and resolve issues, to ensure the overall vision was achieved. Some material was re-scanned and enhanced for display.

Results
The reflective pieces are presented in an attractive online exhibition format (https://ul.ie/midsight), allowing the MPDU staff to promote the midwifery degree course and the individual students can share their own learning logs. However, the logs are also reusable learning objects, and primary sources for further research on midwifery teaching. Already the learning logs have been used informally to identify areas for improvement and to pinpoint challenges in preparation for student placements. A doctoral student working on this project has found that the students find the logs help them both with their reflection and in providing female centred care.

Conclusion
We had previously curated online exhibitions showcasing material from our special and archival collections. Our experience allowed us to offer a new library service to our community and aid them in making an important collection, demonstrating the importance of reflection guided learning, available to a wider audience. We were also able to put in place some workflows and practices that our midwifery colleagues could use to ensure the continuation of the project. We have since worked with colleagues in the History Department on enhancing online engagement with teaching.

Human Touch (Recommended)
The MPDU had wanted to do something with the learning logs for a long time but did not know what or how. We in the library used our digital skills to bridge that knowledge gap to support and educate our colleagues so that they could achieve their goal, and maintain it into the future. As the content is quite poignant and deals with universal topics affecting us all, exploring the material together gave us a chance to reflect on the topics, and to bond over shared life experiences despite our different roles and training.

Biography and Bibliography
Sinéad Keogh is the Digital Services Librarian at the University of Limerick where she manages the Institutional Repository, the Digital Library and the digitisation unit.

Liz Dore is the Librarian supporting the teaching and research of the Faculty of Education & Health Sciences in the University of Limerick with particular interest in systematic reviews.

Keogh-Lifting the lamp from under the bushel-224_a.mp4
   


ID: 191 / O 1.3: 5
Online Oral Presentation
Topics: Professionals Connected

Experience of a librarian involved in a European project for guidelines during the pandemic.

Valeria Scotti1, Gaia Mori2, Cannata Livia3, Prati Federica4, Support-e Consortium5

1Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo of Pavia, Italy; 2European Blood Alliance, EBA, Brussels, Belgium; 3Centro Nazionale Sangue and Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy.; 4Immunohematology and Transfusion Service, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy.; 5Support-e Consortium

Introduction

SUPPORT-E is a research project supported by the European Commission, which brings together the major European Blood Establishments. Its aim is to support high quality clinical trials and their scientific evaluation of Covid-19 Convalescent Plasma (CCP). The main goal of the project is to help EU countries in both assessing the efficacy of a new therapeutic solution to deal with the current Coronavirus crisis and developing new strategies to face potential future pandemics. The project is divided into 7 work packages. My hospital is the leader of the first one (WP1).
Aim

The main objective of WP1 was to assess the current state of the art relating to the collection, characterization, and efficacy of CCP in the treatment of patients with COVID-19 through an analysis of published and ongoing studies. The other objectives included producing preliminary clinical trial guidelines and evaluation criteria, producing preliminary guidelines for monitored access, and ongoing monitoring trials and publications.

Method

An electronic literature search was performed on PubMed, Embase, Cinhal, WHO COVID-19 Global Research Database, CDC COVID-19 Research Article database, ClinicalTrials.gov, Cochrane Covid-19 study Register, WHO ICTRP, Transfusion Evidence Library, and pre-prints databases. A combination of text words was used to maximize the specificity and sensitivity of the search. Refworks3 was used as a reference manager to collect and import all records retrieved from the literature search and eliminate duplicates. Rayyan4 was used to speed up the screening process. Once the results were exported from Refworks to Rayyan, two sections were created: one for articles only and one for trials. The selection of studies was carried out independently by two WP1 reviewers (including the librarian). The eligibility assessment was based on the title or abstract and the full text, if necessary. The whole team decided on the final inclusion or exclusion of the studies.

Results

Three bibliographic searches were launched at different times (from December 2019 through June 2021) for both articles and trials. A total of 9328 articles and 4751 trials were evaluated. Of these, 243 articles and 212 trials were included in the project. In order to collect and enter the data contained in the articles and trials, a special database was built using REdCap. The data from the clinical trials were passed to Wp2 in charge of the selection of the ones feasible for the grant.

Conclusion

In this context, the formulation of recommendations based on scientific and clinical insights from newly developed standardized assays and the evaluation of donor and recipient PCC data have been of paramount importance. Three important guidelines were developed, shared, and discussed with all research teams. Working on such a sensitive and important topic during the pandemic was a personal and professional challenge. Especially in the beginning, when bibliographic research involved structuring complex strings to retrieve every possible article. A further relaunch of the bibliographic research will be carried out in January 2021 for the constant monitoring of publications.

Human Touch

Connecting with doctors, field researchers, and colleagues across Europe has enriched my knowledge and skills.

Biography and Bibliography
I have a degree in Political Science. Since 2009 I have been working as a biomedical librarian at the Scientific Documentation Center of the Research and Health Institute Fondazione San Matteo Policlinico of Pavia. In all these years I have organized conferences, orchestrated courses, held lectures on bibliometric indicators and on the main bibliographic databases. I have participated, as biomedical librarian, to the drafting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. I was re-elected Italian Representative of the EAHIL Council 2019-2022, second term, and I am also the co-founder of the Sig Evaluation And Metrics Group of Eahil.

Scotti-Experience of a librarian involved in a European project-191_a.pptx
   


 
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