Conference Agenda

To read the abstracts of submissions, click on the title of the session at the top of the cell, not on the title of the submission.  

 
 
Session Overview
Session
5.1: Oral Presentations - Education (2)
Time:
Friday, 03/June/2022:
10:30am - 12:00pm

Session Chair: Tiina Marketta Heino
Location: Willem Burgerzaal


Show help for 'Increase or decrease the abstract text size'
Presentations
10:30am - 10:45am
ID: 213 / 5.1: 1
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Developing systematic review expertise: bridging between theory and practice

Marshall Dozier

University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Introduction
The development of methods knowledge, skills and expertise to carry out robust systematic reviews (SRs) requires both an understanding of the underlying research principles and practical experience in design and application of the methods. Information specialists often provide training and guidance in SR planning and methods to students and researchers. The work presented here will give insights into the lived experience of novice systematic reviewers as they become proficient reviewers, and will enable those of use providing support or training to guide other novice reviewers on what to expect and plan to incorporate on their own learning journeys.
Aim
The aim of this evaluation is to map the learning journeys that bridge introductory SR training and the development of proficiency in practice.
Method/ Program Description
We offer Master of Public Health students with a credit-bearing course introducing the principles of SR methods, and providing light-touch practice of each phase of the review process, from question and criteria definition through to summarising findings. The course can only provide introductory-level skills that prepare students to be able to plan their own SR projects, and that more in-depth learning needs to happen while the students carry out SRs of their own. Within our institute we also have an evidence synthesis research group that carries out various review types, from rapid reviews and standalone SRs, to living reviews. We give students who have completed the SR course opportunities to participate in review teams with the research group. Once the students have developed both technical and soft skills, they can take on more challenging roles to enhance their expertise, such as review lead roles.
Results/ Evaluation
We have begun gathering reflective reports from our student and alumni collaborators, and plan to enrich and expand on these early data with focus-group-like discussions. These qualitative data will be analysed thematically.
Conclusion

We have not completed our evaluation, but early indications of learning journey elements from the reflective reports point to:

  • Access to mentoring from more experienced reviewers is valuable
  • Access to peer support and shared learning is valuable
  • Need to develop problem-solving skills to address research design and implementation decisions
  • Need to develop proficiency in relevant software tools needed
  • Need to develop various communication skills for teamwork, collaboration, oral and written expression of findings to different target audiences

Human Touch (Recommended)

building research capacity, supporting early career researchers, creating a learning community

Biography and Bibliography
Marshall Dozier leads a team of Academic Support Librarians working to support the Library in delivering the University's strategies for learning, teaching and research within the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. Marshall offers specialist library support to Deaneries within the Edinburgh Medical School and NHS in Lothian.

Student co-authors will be added.


10:45am - 11:00am
ID: 141 / 5.1: 2
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Re-imagining the Classroom: The Long Term Effects of Coronavirus on Lesson Design

Kristina Caitlin Palmer

Universität Bern Bibliothek Medizin, Switzerland

Introduction

In Europe, few research support programs ensure students will attain a minimum level of competence in systematic searching. The Research Support (RS) department of the University of Bern Medical Library thus devised a curriculum to ensure students receive consistent instruction in research competencies. This program worked well until the onset of the Coronavirus closed classrooms and forced learning into a digital space. The RS team is now using the skills learned during lockdown to create hybrid classes and e-learning modules to support and reach students outside of the classroom.
Aim

This presentation will discuss how RS developed classes before the virus, the changes made during, and the lessons learned during the period of enforced virtual classes that will be applied to future classes both in-person and virtual. This presentation will also introduce participants to tools used to develop courses and course materials.
Method/ Program Description
.

The RS staff developed 12 courses about searching the literature, one of which was integrated in the mandatory curriculum and 10 were integrated as formal electives. These courses were initially presented as in-person courses with no virtual or e-learning materials. In early 2020 the program had to rapidly shift to online only courses which involved creating e-learning materials in the form of videos. Now that courses are slowly being offered in person again RS is developing interactive online tools to help make courses and learning objectives more accessible to students.

Results/ Evaluation

While in person every student was asked to fill out evaluation forms after each class. Classes were also given pre- and post-tests on the major topics of each class to track understanding. The same evaluations were given wile the classes were virtual. These evaluations were generally positive and useful in refining and developing the classes further. Evaluations will be given after the new in-person classes as well. E-learning modules will have a link to a similar evaluation. While high numbers of evaluations aren’t expected from the e-modules the number of people who have accessed the modules can be tracked and the information broken down by section which should allow tracking of which parts of the module are unpopular. Using these evaluation methods will allow for continuous improvement in the courses.

Conclusion

The changes to class design that were forced by the coronavirus will have long lasting effects on classes developed by RS. New classes will have access to online resources and self lead searching modules will be developed to help students who need help with searching and are unable to attend classes. These changes should make classes more accusable and useful to all University patrons.

Human Touch (Recommended)

My hope is that this presentation can help attendees see how e-learning tools, and searching courses can help their students. While these courses do have a high level of involvement in the beginning, they can also reduce the burden of searching help on library staff since students can be directed to classes instead of needing one-on-one meetings.

Biography and Bibliography
Kristina Palmer is a librarian at the University of Bern Medical Library. She has worked there since 2019 designing, developing and updating the searching curriculum. She graduated in 2019 from Texas Women's University with a Masters of Library Science and a Masters of Health Studies.

Previous presentations include:

A Bibliographic Analysis of Librarian Assistance on Systematic Reviews at CU Anschutz Medical Campus Hannah Craven, Kristina Palmer, Christi Piper. 2018 Midcontinental Chapter of the Medical Library Association, Lightning Talk Presentation, Virtual Conference

Bibliographic Management: Acquiring a Site License, Ramping Up Instruction, and The Campus Response. John Jones, Lisa Traditi, Kristina Palmer. 2017 Midcontinental Chapter of the Medical Library Association, Paper Presentation, Columbia, MO


11:00am - 11:15am
ID: 164 / 5.1: 3
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

The Library’s Project Thesis Clinic

Marte Ødegaard, Ivana Malovic, Skjalg Tønnesen Kalvik, Sara Clarke

Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway

Introduction
What do we do when library teaching does not fit into the academic schedule? In response to this challenge, we started a project to provide information literacy teaching “just in time”.

A common challenge faced by academic libraries is reduced time granted to course- integrated teaching of information literacy. This raises the concern that students will not obtain the necessary information literacy skills required for their studies. In this presentation we describe how we met these challenges through the creation of freestanding courses covering central aspects of information literacy, tailored to medical students. The catalyst for this course was the project thesis (20 ECTS) that the students complete as part of their professional education.

The project thesis requires that students complete an independent scientific work wherein they specialize in a chosen field or innovation project. The project thesis is completed over a two-year period where January in year one contains courses in evidence-based medicine (EBM) and how to do a research project, and year two includes two teaching-free periods dedicated to project thesis work. The long time lag between the course in EBM and the individual study-period makes it difficult for the students to apply what they have learned. This leads to periodically increased pressure on the library due to the large number of students requesting instruction during their periods of self-directed learning.

Aim
The aim of this project was to find a solution to the added pressure on library services during the project thesis period by creating a suite of freestanding courses tailored specifically to the needs of the students. We had the following questions in the development of the project:

  • At which time will the students find the courses most useful?
  • How do we ensure that students get timely information when the project thesis stretches over a two-year period, and when faculty leaves little room for practical training in information skills?
  • How do we ensure the teaching we provide is relevant and covers the necessary topics?

Program Description
We created a collection of freestanding courses named the Project thesis clinic. The Project Thesis Clinic (PTC) lasts for a month and includes courses on academic writing, literature searching, critical appraisal, citing scientific literature, and individual guidance.

Evaluation
High attendance and positive feedback from the first clinic in 2021 showed the PTC was successful, which prompted the library to plan it again for January 2022. We adjusted the program based on feedback from the students in 2021 and aim to collect feedback in January 2022 using evaluation forms after the clinic has taken place.

Conclusion

This project has allowed us to test new teaching approaches, as well as ensuring that students receive required information literacy training “just-in-time” for when it is required. The global pandemic and need for digital solutions have also affected how the project has been developed.

Human Touch

Medical students feel the library provides them with the tools needed for success in their project.

Biography and Bibliography
Marte Ødegaard holds a Master of Science in Evidence Based Practice in Health Care and works at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway. Her work interests are information literacy, systematic searches, and the librarians role in research.

Ivana Malovic holds a Ph.d. in Medical Biology and works at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway. Her work interests are critical appraisal, open science and research data management.

Skjalg Tønnessen Kalvik holds a Bachelor of Library and Information Sciences and works at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway.

Sara Clarke holds a Master in Information Services Management and is Head of Section for Literature Searching and EBM at the Library of Medicine and Science, University of Oslo, Norway.


11:15am - 11:30am
ID: 142 / 5.1: 4
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Assessing EBM Behaviors of Medical Students via an OSCE: The Librarian Perspective

Joey Nicholson1, Adina Kalet2, Anique de Bruin3, Cees van der Vleuten3

1NYU Health Sciences Library, NYU Langone Health, USA; 2Kern Institute, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA; 3Maastricht University, School of Health Professions Eduction, Netherlands

Introduction
The ability for medical students to form clinical questions and retrieve evidence to advance patient care is an integral set of skills necessary both to provide the best care, and also to meet lifelong learning goals. While it is common for librarians to teach these skills, it is much less common for librarians to contribute actively to robust formative assessment of them as part of their education practice.

When librarians assess these evidence-based medicine (EBM) skills in medical students, the assessments tend to run parallel to standard curricular assessments and are based solely on multiple choice or essay-style written exams. However, this does not allow an opportunity for formative feedback to be given on actual performed behaviors integrated with other key clinical activities.

Observed structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are a common method of assessing and providing feedback on how medical students actually perform behaviors that they are expected to practice. Ideally, assessment of EBM should be integrated into existing assessment systems and structures, like the OSCE, in order to be better aligned with medical student and faculty expectations. This type of assessment is necessary to reinforce learning and provide actionable feedback.

An EBM OSCE station was recently developed and implemented as part of an immersive OSCE assessing multiple clinical skills. This EBM OSCE is currently being used at a cohort of 6 medical schools.

However, librarians involved have not been familiar with or prepared to assess EBM behaviors via observation. The purpose of this study is to determine how feasible and useful it is for librarians to assess medical student EBM behaviors via a video-observed OSCE.
Aim
To understand and document the experiences and preferences of health sciences librarians regarding assessing EBM behaviors in medical students in order to inform EBM assessment tool development and validation and offer potential solutions to barriers in implementation.
Method/ Program Description
This study will employ a focus group design using an opportunistic sample of health sciences librarians who have already participated in this video-observed EBM OSCE. Focus groups will be followed up as necessary with individual semi-structured interviews.
Results/ Evaluation
Focus group transcripts will be analyzed and coded using a Constructivist Grounded Theory approach. Data will be primarily analyzed by the principal investigator beginning with a round of initial coding to surface main themes, and a second round of focused coding. Focus groups are planned for early 2022.

Conclusion

It is expected that librarians will find assessing EBM behaviors of medical students via a video-based OSCE useful in providing formative feedback to students and helping to reinforce key concepts in EBM. Additionally, by observing and understanding student behaviors, librarians can create a feedback loop to improve and better tailor their instruction. However, it is also expected that librarians may face many common barriers to feasibility, including: the time commitment, curricular support, and administrative support.

Human Touch

This research aims to help librarians connect better with both students and faculty and to further understanding of the role of the librarian in teaching and assessment of EBM.

Biography and Bibliography
Mr. Joey Nicholson is the Chair and Director of the NYU Health Sciences Library at NYU Langone Health. Over the past 10 years, he has been responsible for integrating evidence-based medicine teaching and assessment within the curriculum for students in the Grossman School of Medicine. As a part of this work, he worked with a team of clinicians and faculty to develop better ways of assessing and providing feedback to medical students on these important skills. This research is also a part of his dissertation work, focused on assessing EBM behaviors via observation. Below is a short list of recent publications relevant to and fundamental in developing and guiding this abstract proposal.

1. Kalet A, Zabar S, Szyld D, et al. A simulated "Night-onCall" to assess and address the readiness-for-internship of transitioning medical students. Adv Simul (Lond). 2017;2:13. Published 2017 Aug 14. doi:10.1186/s41077-017-0046-1

2. Nicholson J, Spak JM, Kovar-Gough I, Lorbeer ER, Adams NE. Entrustable professional activity 7: opportunities to collaborate on evidence-based medicine teaching and assessment of medical students. BMC Med Educ. 2019;19(1):330. Published 2019 Sep 3. doi:10.1186/s12909-019-1764-y

3. Nicholson J, Kalet A, van der Vleuten C, de Bruin A. Understanding medical student evidence-based medicine information seeking in an authentic clinical simulation. J Med Libr Assoc. 2020;108(2):219-228. doi:10.5195/jmla.2020.875


11:30am - 11:45am
ID: 232 / 5.1: 5
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Building searching skills early in the veterinary school curriculum to support evidence based practice

Heather K Moberly, Virginia R Fajt

Texas A&M University, United States of America

Introduction

Evidence based practice is based on a series of steps that include identification, critical appraisal, and application of information. Learning to create answerable questions to describe a clinical scenario and to construct literature searches are foundation steps for the appraisal and application. Librarians are well suited to teach and assess these first steps and to collaborate with veterinary faculty to create a complete and contextualized evidence based medicine, or evidence based veterinary medicine education experience for students.

Aim

A veterinary faculty member teaching evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) in a pharmacology course included librarian a led instruction session for a number of years. During a curriculum reorganization, EBVM was added to the first year curriculum as a component of the Critical Thinking module in the Professional and Clinical Skills (PCS) course. The aim of this move was to introduce EBVM earlier in the curriculum and provide additional opportunities for these skills to be scaffolded and reinforced throughout the four year curriculum.

Method/ Program Description

This presentation describes the collaborative EBVM sessions and assignments during the first two years of veterinary school during the PCS course in year one and the pharmacology course in year two. These classes were recently redesigned to provide the students with a contiguous three semester foundation of the Ask, Acquire, and Appraise steps of EBVM. During this sequence of sessions both the subject and library faculty provide lectures, hands-on laboratories, anonymous and non-anonymous in class "polling" interactions, and feedback for both ungraded and graded assignments.

Results/ Evaluation

The current series of EBVM sessions and assignments during the first two years of a veterinary curriculum expand upon their predecessors. The additional sessions and assignments are placed in a more contextualized environment to increase perceived relevance by the students.

Conclusion

Expanding time in the critical thinking module of the veterinary curriculum (spring semester, year one), increasing the number of graded assignments and the associated point values of the assignments, and strengthening instruction support for searching skills is expected to improve searching skills and increase retention of the skills for use the following semester (Fall semester, year two). Improving these first and second year skills is expected to improve comfort and adoption of the EBVM method in the later clinical years of the curriculum and in postgraduate practice.

Biography and Bibliography
Heather K. Moberly currently serves as the Coordinator of Veterinary Information and Research Services and holds the Dorothy G. Whitley Professorship in Library Science. Dr. Virginia R. Fajt is a clinical professor and clinical veterinary pharmacologist who teaches throughout the veterinary curriculum and currently serves as Chair of the Curriculum Committee. In 2013 they began collaborating with the explicit intention to improve and increase the inclusion of the evidence-based veterinary medicine methodology across the veterinary curriculum. Both recently completed terms in offices in the Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine Association; Fajt as Director followed by President, Moberly as Executive Secretary followed by Director. Moberly is a co-author of the "Acquire" module of the EBVM Learning online, open access tutorial. (https://EBVMLearning.org)


11:45am - 12:00pm
ID: 226 / 5.1: 6
Oral Presentation
Topics: Education

Online-only postgraduate taught programmes at the University of Edinburgh – unexpected benefits to online only students of the development of online services and resources to support campus based students during Covid

Fiona Brown, Marshall Dozier

University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Introduction

The University of Edinburgh has provided online only postgraduate taught programmes since 2004, and the Library has supported these programmes and students, developing services and resources to do so. Over this time, the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine (CMVM) had a strategic aim to increase the number of postgraduate programmes delivered online only. In the 2020-2021 academic year 95% of CMVM’s 3000 postgraduate taught students were on online only programmes.
In March 2020, in common with universities and colleges worldwide, the University of Edinburgh responded to the Covid outbreak by looking at ways to move campus-based learning, teaching and support online. CMVM used the experience of delivering online-only programmes to feed into this. From a library services perspective, there were also knock-on benefits for students on online only programmes as further online resources and services moved online.

Aim

We will report on our activities in supporting the transition to online and the unexpected impacts on our online only students.
Program Description

In the Library, we used our experience of supporting online only programmes to help develop our support for the campus based students who were transitioning to online. We provide online resources, online teaching and online trouble shooting. Following the start of the pandemic, we made better use of some of the technology which we already had, delivering more of our services online.
We will be forecasting the impact should services return to pre-pandemic availability options.

Evaluation

We are in the process of gathering input from our library colleagues in our collections services teams and our academic support teams. We are evaluating whether, and how, we will adjust our teaching and support practices even if we have a return to campus.
We are also gathering input from academic colleagues, course teams and students on online-only programmes on how (if at all) our resource and service developments have impacted on the learning and teaching experience.

Conclusion

We are still gathering information on the impacts of these changes and developments. Indicative areas we are looking at include the changes to delivery, and recording of, our one-to-one and generic information skills provision; how the increase in our recorded information skills provision has impacted on how we deliver our teaching and support; and the growth of our etextbook provision and whether this is sustainable.

Human Touch (Recommended)

The authors would be interested in hearing if colleagues in other libraries have had similar experiences.
We feel this links with current dialogues in the UK networks on ebook costs.

Biography and Bibliography
Fiona Brown is Academic Support Librarian for Veterinary Medicine, Roslin Institute and Biological Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. She provides specialist support to staff and students, both campus based and online, in all matters relating to library services. Her role includes the design, delivery and evaluation of information skills training for staff and students. She liaises with colleagues to support the Library in delivering the University's strategies for learning, teaching and research. She is a co-author of EBVM Learning (ebvmlearning.org).

Marshall Dozier leads a team of Academic Support Librarians working to
support the Library in delivering the University's strategies for
learning, teaching and research within the College of Medicine and
Veterinary Medicine. Marshall offers specialist library support to
Deaneries within the Edinburgh Medical School and NHS in Lothian.


 
Contact and Legal Notice · Contact Address:
Privacy Statement · Conference: EAHIL 2022
Conference Software - ConfTool Pro 2.6.144
© 2001–2022 by Dr. H. Weinreich, Hamburg, Germany