Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
Session Overview
Date: Saturday, 26/May/2018
9:00am
-
10:30am
1a: Emulation is the Sincerest Form of Flattery
Location: CL 312
Chair: Marley Grace Liepert
 

Emulation is the Sincerest Form of Flattery

Marley Grace Liepert, Stanley Isaac Ruecker, Jon Saklofske

1b: Networks in Text and Space
Location: CL 417
Chair: Harvey Quamen
 

Corpora and Text Mining the Eighteenth Century

Catherine Nygren


"Or, The Whale": Stylistic Analysis of Melville’s Cetology Narratives

Chelsea Miya


Scriblerian Mappings: Experiments in Visualizing 18th-century London's texts as Networks

Allison Muri

 
10:30am
-
11:00am
B1: Break
Location: CL 312
11:00am
-
12:30pm
2a: Historical Geographies
Location: CL 312
Chair: Allison Muri
 

Historical Geographical Information Systems and Environmental History in Canada

Mica Jorgenson, Laura Larsen


Recreating Historical Geographies: Projects and Methods, Challenges and Successes

Robert Ryan Imes


Espaces et anti-lieux: la production de l’imaginaire géographique dans les récits de voyage, 1744-1808

François Dominic Laramée

2b: Digital Material/Materializing the Digital
Location: CL 417
Chair: Constance Crompton
 

The materialization of disability in the fanfiction archive

Catherine Duchastel de Montrouge


Developing Local Digital Collections: A collaborative approach to the preservation and access of artist-run centre archives

Shannon Lucky, Bernice Leyeza


Bill Reid’s Black Eagle Canoe: Reproduction, Circulation and Digital Repatriation

Bryan Wayne Myles

2c: Workflows and Architectures
Location: CL 313
Chair: Geoffrey Rockwell
 

Code Notebooks: New Tools for Digital Humanists

Kynan Tran Ly, Kaitlyn Grant, Robert Budac, Jinman Zhang, Greg Whistance-Smith, Geoffrey Rockwell, Anthony Owino, Jason Bradshaw, Stéfan Sinclair


The Role of Digital Humanists in the Implementation of Computerized Workflows

Maryse Kiese


Textual Communities -- what and why

Peter Robinson

12:30pm
-
2:00pm
L1: Lunch
2:00pm
-
3:30pm
3a: Mapping Layered Histories
Location: CL 312
Chair: Emily Christina Murphy
 

Mapping Mortality: Using HGIS to Identify Regional Variation in Infant Mortality Rates in County Durham, England (1900-1914)

Danika Bonham


Digital Mapping for Eighteenth-Century Literature: James Boswell’s "London Journal 1762-1763" and Street Prostitution.

Rodrigo Pablo Yanez

3b: Conversation, Collaboration, and Cycles
Location: CL 417
Chair: Matthew Bouchard
 

Conversations in scholarly journals: experimenting scientific communication with a dynamic and continuous editorial format

Nicolas Sauret, Marcello Vitali-Rosati, Servanne Monjour, Timothee Guicherd, Joana Casenave, Karine Bissonnette, Enrico Agostini


Online Collaborations as Transparency

Hilda Smith


Further Down the Spiral: Exploring the Abandonment of Online Digital Humanities Projects

Luis Meneses, Jonathan Martin, Richard Furuta, Ray Siemens

3c: Format and Translations
Location: CL 313
Chair: Kim Martin
 

Methodological Translation: _Lexicons of Early Modern English_ and TEI

Tim Alberdingk Thijm, Ian Lancashire


New Format, Old Tricks? Texts’ Graphic Travels

Constance Crompton, Ruth Truong, Michelle Schwartz


Patterning Chaos: Periodical Publications and the Small Worlds of Literary Translators

Raluca Tanasescu, Chris Tanasescu

3:30pm
-
4:00pm
B2: Break, Sponsored by University of Toronto Press
Location: CL 128
4:00pm
-
5:30pm
4a: Locating the Holocaust (A. K. Knowles)
Location: CL 128
Chair: Susan Brown
Locating the Holocaust: Issues in Connecting Traumatic Experience to Perpetrator Places
A. K. Knowles (U. Maine)
For decades, research in Holocaust Studies has been split in two, with most scholars studying either the victims of the Holocaust or those who perpetrated the genocide of Jews, Roma and Sinti, and other targeted groups. This lecture will explain how the Holocaust Geographies Collaborative is seeking to bridge the divide by locating testimony by survivors in the places where the Holocaust happened, at every geographical scale. Conventional mapping has been important in this effort, but the uncertainty of many places and times in testimony have required new approaches to spatial narrative, including inductive visualization and topological mapping.
Date: Sunday, 27/May/2018
9:00am
-
10:30am
5a: Accessing Conceptual Domains
Location: CL 136
Chair: Geoffrey Rockwell
 

Adjoined Conceptual Domains in the Bilingual Poetry of Pablo Picasso

Luis Meneses, Enrique Mallen


The Palatine Anthology project: an API allowing new interactions with the Greek epigrams

Joana Casenave, Marcello Vitali-Rosati, Elsa Bouchard, Monjour Servanne, Sauret Nicolas, Agostini Enrico, Juchereau Arthur


Absorbing DiRT: Tool Discovery in the Digital Age

Kaitlyn Grant, Geoffrey Rockwell, Quinn Dombrowski

5b: Ontologies and Networks
Location: CL 232
Chair: Harvey Quamen
 

History-as-data: The Philosophy of History and Event Ontologies

Matthew Milner


The shift to three-dimensional thinking of the family: Advancing historical multigenerational mobility research through the use of ‘whole-family network analysis’

Megan Elizabeth MacCormac


CWRC-y Tactics: Anti-Foundationalism and Ontology-Building for the Humanities

Susan Brown, Joel Cummings, Abi Lemak, Kim Martin, Alliyya Mohammed, Deborah Stacey

5c: Digital Methods Across National Contexts
Location: CL 316
Chair: Randa El Khatib
 

Digital Humanities and the Study of British Newspaper and Periodical History in China

Kang Ye


Reimagining Digital Identities: Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code

Narayanamoorthy Nanditha


Digital Health Humanities: Projects and Possibilities in the Canadian Context

Andrea Charise

10:30am
-
11:00am
B3: Break
Location: CL 232
11:00am
-
12:30pm
6a: Abstraction and Big Data
Location: CL 136
Chair: Luis Meneses
 

Reading Canada Reads: Big Data, Mass Reading Events, and Narratives of Nation

Jeremy Haynes, Paul Barrett, Sarah Roger


Splendid Isolation: Big Data, Correspondence Analysis and Visualization in France

Geoffrey Rockwell, Stéfan Sinclair


Measuring Abstraction Using Word Embedding: Unsupervised Learning of Generic Categories

Ryder A Wishart

6b: Data and Diversity: Feminist Linked Open Data Practices in Victorian and Modernist Studies
Location: CL 232
Chair: Alison Fay Hedley
 

Data and Diversity: Feminist Linked Open Data Practices in Victorian and Modernist Studies

Alison Hedley, Emily Christina Murphy, Jana Smith Elford

6c: Making Pedagogy Work
Location: CL 316
Chair: Chelsea Miya
 

Shallow DH: accessible text analysis for students

Matthew Bouchard


The Pedagogy of a Project: Just because we can do it, are we doing it well? Considerations of access and community engagement in DH pedagogy and projects

Samantha Cutrara


Making, Community: Investigating Diversity in DH Centers and Makerspaces

Kim Martin

12:30pm
-
2:00pm
L2: Lunch
1:30pm
-
3:00pm
7b: Podcasting and the Transformation of Scholarly Communication - Joint Panel with ACCUTE
Location: LC 208
Chair: Hannah McGregor
With the rise of Open Access publishing and calls for scholars to increase the impact of our work beyond the university, scholarly communication is in the midst of a major transformation.The scholarly publishing community simultaneously faces sizeable challenges as it attempts to meet the various needs of scholars while coping with rising costs, diminishing sales, and limited (or no) financial support from publishers' home institutions. We will also use this opportunity to share information about the collaborative work Wilfrid Laurier University Press and the Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing are currently undertaking in developing methods for peer-reviewing podcasts.
2:00pm
-
3:30pm
7a: Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellow Plenary Panel
Location: CL 136
Chair: Constance Crompton
Join us for a discussion of the pressing issues identified by early career researchers.
 

Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellow Plenary Panel

Catherine Nygren, Chelsea Miya, Kim Martin, Matthew Bouchard

3:30pm
-
4:00pm
B4: Break
Location: CL 232
4:00pm
-
5:30pm
8a Posters and Demos
Location: CL 232
 

“Big Brother is Watching You”: Space and Self-Surveillance

Ilgin Kizilgunesler


GameSound - A Ludomusicological Database Prototype

Melissa Mony, Michael Iantorno


Go Queer

Maureen Engel, Bamdad Aghilidehkordi, Kathleen Oliver, Kris Joseph


Humanizing Deportation Digital Storytelling Project

Lizbeth De La Cruz Santana, Sarah Hart


Identifying Narrative Events in Screenplays: A Fabricator’s Computational Approach

Joseph Rafla


Network Dynamics of Mirza Ghalib’s Thematic Expressions

Abdul Wahid Khan, Syed Affan Aslam


Political Advocacy for Childhood Arrivals. DACAmented: DREAMs Without Borders Digital Storytelling Project

Lizbeth De La Cruz Santana


TATR: Using Content Analysis to Study Twitter Data

Kynan Tran Ly, Robert Budac, Geoffrey Rockwell, Jason Bradshaw, Anthony Owino, Greg Whistance-Smith, Jinman Zhang, Kaitlyn Grant, Stéfan Sinclair


Textual Communities: the system

Peter Robinson


Use and digital preservation of the databases of the Center for Research in Social History of Culture of the Institute of Philosophy and Human Sciences of Unicamp

Willian de Carvalho Silva


The mixed-race experience: Factors influencing mixed-race individuals' attitudes towards identity and belonging

Aurora Marjorie Tsai, Tevis Arthur Tsai

6:00pm R: President's Reception
Date: Monday, 28/May/2018
8:30am
-
10:00am
9c: Diversifying Narratives: Intersections of Public and Digital History in the 21st Century -- Joint Panel with CHA and CCDH
Location: ED 315
Chair: Jo-Anne McCutcheon
This roundtable brings together leading Canadian scholars from inside and outside academia who are engaged in public and digital history projects. They will discuss how the intersections of digital and public history hold tremendous potential for increased public engagement, research dissemination, and community-building, while also providing new avenues for historical scholarship. While some individuals advocate a return to larger-scale national narratives that answer the "big questions," this roundtable will explore how digital and public histories can be used to create histories that are at once more accessible to the public as well as more reflective of the increasing diversity of our nation. Andrea Eidinger (University of British Columbia/Unwritten Histories) Jessica DeWitt (University of Saskatchewan) Jessica Knapp (Canada's History Society) Krista McCracken (Arthur A. Wishart Library and Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre, Algoma University)
 

Diversifying Narratives: Intersections of Public and Digital History in the 21st Century -- Joint Panel with CHA and CCDH

Andrea Eidinger, Krista McCracken, Jessica Knapp, Jessica DeWitt

9:00am
-
10:30am
9b: Visualizing and Digitizing Early Modern Texts - Joint Panel with CSRS
Location: CL 232
Chair: Brent L. Nelson
 

Remapping the Literary Cartography of Paradise Lost

Randa El Khatib


Literary Influence and Data Visualization: The Case of Milton, Bunyan, and the Bible

Harvey Quamen


GEMMS (Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons): An Introduction

Anne James, Jeanne Shami

9d: Affective and Effective Cultures
Location: CL 316
Chair: Maureen Engel
 

Conversation, Discourse and Play: Interaction and Moderation in Twitch.tv Video Game Live Streaming

Mark Richard Johnson, Jamie Woodcock


_Bioshock Infinite_ and Feminist Theory: A Technical Approach

Jason Richard Bradshaw


Figuring Affective Phenomena: The Architectures of Machine Emotion

Rebecca Anderson

10:00am
-
12:30pm
9a: ***MOVED ROOM and TIME** Climate Change and Academia - Joint Panel with ESAC. First Nations Room 2000, 10:30-1:00
Location: ED 185
Chair: Constance Crompton
This interdisciplinary roundtable brings together four distinct and leading voices in the discussion of how to reduce academia's carbon footprint at scholarly conferences. The session will address how universities and scholarly organizations can adopt new low carbon technologies and policies, and highlight criteria and other ways to help scholars flourish in their careers while using only their fair share of carbon. Ryan Katz-Rosene (University of Ottawa), Simon Donner (University of British Columbia, Geoffrey Rockwell (University of Alberta), Peter Shepherd (Climate Activist and Communications Coordinator of ESAC).
 

Climate Change and Academia - Joint Panel with ESAC

Simon Donner, Ryan Katz-Rosene, Geoffrey Rockwell, Peter Shepherd

10:30am
-
11:00am
B5: Break
Location: ED 315
11:00am
-
12:30pm
10a: Tools for our Times
Location: CL 232
Chair: John Edward Simpson
 

Usability, Accessibility, and Performance: Striking the right Balance with the Archives Unleashed Toolkit

Ryan Deschamps, Jimmy Lin, Nick Ruest, Samantha Fritz, Ian Milligan


Social Media Engine: Changing User Engagement in Open Access Repositories

Luis Meneses, Alyssa Arbuckle, Hector Lopez, Belaid Moa, Ray Siemens


Tagging my Tears and Fears: Text-Mining the Autoethnography

Sonja Christina Sapach

10c: Digitization and Revitalization Across Domains
Location: CL 316
Chair: Catherine Nygren
 

"The Digital Bride" or "Digitization Takes Command": Unified Evaluations of Diverse Cultural Practices

Dan Costa Baciu


Epistemic Illegibility and Knowledge Production in Computational Humanistic Inquiry

Sayan Bhattacharyya


Dravidian Languages: Analyzing Digital Solutions for Revitalization

Narayanamoorthy Nanditha

12:30pm
-
2:00pm
L3: Lunch (optional grad and postdoc mentorship lunch in CL232)
2:00pm
-
3:30pm
11a AGM
Location: CL 128
3:30pm
-
4:00pm
B6: Break, Sponsored by University of Toronto Press
Location: CL 128
4:00pm
-
5:30pm
12a: Figuring Out a Path (Bertrand Gervais, Outstanding Achievement Award winner)
Location: CL 128
Chair: Constance Crompton
Figuring Out a Path: Building a Knowledge and Research Environment in Digital Culture
Bertrand Gervais (UQAM)
This talk will deal with the experience leading the Montreal based NT2 Lab, as well as the Figura Research Center. The Figura Research Center used the NT2 CFI infrastructure to offer the Figura community new ways of publishing its research. The team's argument is that the web was not just a substitute to paper and the paper-based modes of publishing research, but offered a platform to think anew of ways to mobilise and publish research. The team did not just theorize these possibilities, but rather set out to do it. They set out to build a digital ecosystem, a series of linked Knowledge and Research Environments, all focusing on the contemporary, what in French is defined as l’imaginaire contemporain, not just contemporary imagination, but the contemporary as an interface, a set of filters, parameters and conventions that underlie our understanding of the world.

 
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